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San Fernando Valley Schools

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2001 | MASSIE RITSCH
For about 180 middle school students who casually eat lunch and share books with classmates of all colors, religions and backgrounds, Terrence Roberts' experience at Central High School was hard to believe. He was an A student who received Bs on his report card because he was the only black student in class, a white classmate nearly beat him with a baseball bat and National Guardsmen tried to block the skinny 15-year-old from entering his school.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2001 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Department of Education has postponed until September a public hearing on whether the San Fernando Valley's public schools should secede from the Los Angeles Unified School District, officials said Monday. The hearing was delayed at the request of the union that represents the district's 43,000 teachers, counselors, psychologists and nurses. The hearing will be held during the state board's Sept. 5 meeting in Sacramento instead of June 7.
NEWS
May 10, 1993 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly half of all San Fernando Valley residents believe their public schools are delivering an inadequate education, and a clear majority support a Valley breakaway from the mammoth Los Angeles Unified School District as a means of achieving more local control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2000 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
Nearly 600 computers--donated by businesses and government agencies and refurbished by inmates--will be placed in San Fernando Valley public schools, it was announced this week at a ceremony at Tulsa Street Elementary School. The Pentium 300-megahertz computers, with Windows 95 software, will be delivered next month to 50 schools in the central and northeast San Fernando Valley. Each school will get three to 15 computers, except for six that will receive 30 computers each.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1994 | SUSAN BYRNES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fifty-nine percent of the fourth-grade students at Van Nuys Elementary School demonstrated little or no mathematical thinking. Forty-five percent of the eighth-graders at San Fernando Middle School wrote answers to questions in a disorganized, undeveloped and vague manner. Fifty percent of the 10th-graders at Canoga Park High School read with only superficial connection between different parts of a text. But do these numbers really tell the story?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to improve student achievement in an area where two-thirds of the elementary students do not read at grade level, the Los Angeles Unified School District is teaming with private foundations and businesses to launch a curriculum reform measure in some eastern San Fernando Valley schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1995 | JEAN MERL and BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After several years on the sidelines, Mayor Richard Riordan announced Thursday that he plans to take a new leadership role in the campaign to break up the Los Angeles school district, and offered to create a city advisory panel to coordinate the growing demand for smaller districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1993 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fractious funding feud between the Los Angeles school district and its two San Fernando Valley charter schools came before the Board of Education for the first time Monday, with school and district officials holding fast to their opposing views on how the nearly independent campuses should be supported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1994 | CHIP JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lt. Walter Nelson of the School Police of the Los Angeles Unified School District talked about his agency's work in the San Fernando Valley schools, from monitoring the recent anti-Proposition 187 protests to daily duties. The investigator, a 22-year veteran school officer, discussed the similarities and differences in youth over his career and the crimes against people and property that continue to plague the school district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1991 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Unified School District board on Monday authorized four San Fernando Valley high schools to take the first step toward changing from three-year programs to four years as part of a districtwide movement reshaping secondary education. The unanimous decision authorized administrators at Chatsworth, Granada Hills, James Monroe and John F. Kennedy high schools to begin studying possible enrollment of ninth-graders beginning next fall.
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