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July 8, 1988 | TODD J. GILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
The city has grown up around San Francisco's last sliver of agriculture. Passenger trains running through a half-mile tunnel built beneath the farm in 1907 rattle the herbs a bit. Exhaust from cars traveling the street--once a little-used dirt road--that runs by the farm has scarred the lettuce in the past. But until recently, it seemed that the three-acre Demattei family farm was resistant to the factors that closed down hundreds of other farms that once colored the city's landscape.
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BUSINESS
July 8, 1988 | TODD J. GILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
The city has grown up around San Francisco's last sliver of agriculture. Passenger trains running through a half-mile tunnel built beneath the farm in 1907 rattle the herbs a bit. Exhaust from cars traveling the street--once a little-used dirt road--that runs by the farm has scarred the lettuce in the past. But until recently, it seemed that the three-acre Demattei family farm was resistant to the factors that closed down hundreds of other farms that once colored the city's landscape.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO - Sandwiched between rows of homes in the fog-kissed Mission Terrace neighborhood, Little City Gardens provides salad greens and fresh-cut flowers to local restaurants from what was once a weedy vacant lot. Like many of California's urban agriculture practitioners, however, Caitlyn Galloway is plagued by a key uncertainty: She is on a month-to-month lease with a landlord who must recoup the lot's steep property taxes and may soon...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2011 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
In a dense pocket of the Mission Terrace neighborhood, a quiet grid of streets near the city's southern edge, the afternoon fog rolls in over a rare sight: nearly an acre of land sandwiched between homes and planted with kale, exotic salad greens, bursts of flowers and fragrant herbs. The women who work this plot are pioneers. Their Little City Gardens recently became the first legal commercial farm within city borders. Thanks to them, San Francisco leaders revised zoning laws to allow the cultivation and sale of produce in all neighborhoods.
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