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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
It's not clear how the dog wound up in the middle of San Francisco Bay, but when windsurfers and a boating commuter stumbled upon the Labrador mix on Monday, she was cold and in need of help. "She was shivering and wet and very shy," said 52-year-old Lisa Grodin, whose husband, Adam Cohen, found the dog as he was commuting across the bay to their home in Berkeley about 6:45 p.m.  Grodin said Tuesday that her husband saw a group of windsurfers with "their sails down around this little black dot that turned out to be a dog....
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Two small planes collided Sunday afternoon over a northern area of the San Francisco Bay, sending one crashing into the water, according to the Coast Guard. The collision involved a Cessna 210 and a Hawker Sea Fury TMK 20, which collided over San Pablo Bay about 4:05 p.m., said Ian Gregor, public affairs manager for the Federal Aviation Administration. The Hawker landed safely at a Northern California airport and its pilot was reportedly not injured, Gregor said. The Cessna fell into the water, spurring the Coast Guard to launch four rescue boats and a helicopter to search the waters, said Coast Guard spokeswoman Loumania Stewart.
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BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- The San Francisco Bay is getting even friendlier to tech companies. As fleets of luxury shuttle buses that transport San Francisco employees to and from work in the Silicon Valley continue to make waves, technology companies have been searching for alternatives. Facebook is the latest company to offer its staffers in San Francisco a free ride to work on a catamaran. The giant social network began testing the private ferry service, which it is calling a "water taxi," on Feb. 4. The catamaran holds 30 people and is outfitted with Wi-Fi, coffee and snacks.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- A group of lawmakers is hoping the recent string of Southern California temblors will jolt Congress into funding an earthquake warning system. The lawmakers are seeking some of the $38.3 million needed to build the system on the West Coast and the $16.1 million a year needed to operate and maintain it. "Even a few seconds of warning before the next Big One will allow people to seek cover, automatically slow or stop trains, pause surgeries and more -- and the benefits of this small investment now will be paid back many times over after the first damaging quake,'" said Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Burbank)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Two small planes collided Sunday afternoon over a northern area of the San Francisco Bay, sending one crashing into the water, according to the Coast Guard. The collision involved a Cessna 210 and a Hawker Sea Fury TMK 20, which collided over San Pablo Bay about 4:05 p.m., said Ian Gregor, public affairs manager for the Federal Aviation Administration. The Hawker landed safely at a Northern California airport and its pilot was reportedly not injured, Gregor said. The Cessna fell into the water, spurring the Coast Guard to launch four rescue boats and a helicopter to search the waters, said Coast Guard spokeswoman Loumania Stewart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2009 | Associated Press
A lack of communication between crew members played a critical role in the crash of a container ship that led to a massive oil spill in San Francisco Bay nearly 15 months ago, federal safety officials said Wednesday. The 901-foot-long Cosco Busan sideswiped the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in November 2007. Two fuel tanks ruptured and more than 53,000 gallons of fuel oil spilled.
TRAVEL
March 13, 2005
Richard Smith of Fremont captured this sunset at the Don Edwards Refuge Center in south San Francisco Bay. He took the shot about 5:30 p.m. from the highest point overlooking the park, which spans 30,000 acres of bay, salt marsh and other habitats. Situated along the Pacific Flyway, the migratory rest stop hosts more than 280 species of birds each year. "It is the first urban area to become a national wildlife refuge," Smith says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
A Chinese crab regarded as a delicacy in its native land has spread to California where scientists fear it could harm crops, levees and possibly the health of people who eat them. Researchers at the Marine Science Institute netted five Chinese mitten crabs in south San Francisco Bay--enough to conclude the crabs are living and breeding and won't disappear, biologists said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
In the choppy waters of San Francisco Bay, scientists have discovered the first known foreign marine microbe to immigrate into U.S. coastal waters. Researchers from UC Berkeley and the U.S. Geological Survey reported today at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Denver that a single-celled organism is now living in the bay. Called Trochammina hadai, the amoeba-like creatures normally live in the shallow estuaries and bays of Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Plants and animals not native to the area have made San Francisco Bay the "most invaded aquatic ecosystem in North America," a government report says. The report, prepared for the Fish and Wildlife Commission, is to be released Friday at a forum in Washington, D.C., sponsored by Sen. John Glenn (D-Ohio) the same day he plans to introduce legislation barring the discharge of organism-laced ballast water in estuaries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
HAMILTON CITY, Calif. - A shallow inland sea spreads across more than 160 square miles, speckled with egrets poking for crayfish among jewel-green rice shoots. The flooded fields could be mistaken for the rice paddies of Vietnam or southern China, but this is Northern California at the onset of severe drought. The scene is a testament to the inequities of California's system of water rights, a hierarchy of haves as old as the state. PHOTOS: The water diversion debate Thanks to seniority, powerful Central Valley irrigation districts that most Californians have never heard of are at the head of the line for vast amounts of water, even at the expense of the environment and the rest of the state.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- The San Francisco Bay is getting even friendlier to tech companies. As fleets of luxury shuttle buses that transport San Francisco employees to and from work in the Silicon Valley continue to make waves, technology companies have been searching for alternatives. Facebook is the latest company to offer its staffers in San Francisco a free ride to work on a catamaran. The giant social network began testing the private ferry service, which it is calling a "water taxi," on Feb. 4. The catamaran holds 30 people and is outfitted with Wi-Fi, coffee and snacks.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
Following a series of complaints lodged against Google's "mystery barge," a state agency has ordered the tech titan to relocate the project.  San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission Executive Director Larry Goldzband told the Associated Press on Monday that the company did not obtain the proper permits for the project. PHOTOS: Google unveils new Glass frames Because the project was unauthorized, the Treasure Island Development Authority, which leased the warehouse where the barge was constructed, could also face fines and penalties, Goldzband said.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Richard Simon, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
WASHINGTON -- Rep. George Miller, a San Francisco Bay area liberal and dean of the California congressional delegation, announced Monday that he will retire when his term ends, closing a 40-year career on Capitol Hill.  The veteran Democrat's departure will leave just one lawmaker, Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Los Angeles), in the House who was elected in the Watergate class of 1974 to serve continuously in the chamber since then. Also, Miller's retirement will further shake up the state's 53-member delegation that underwent a large turnover in 2012 due to a spate of retirements and defeats.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN QUENTIN - North of Silicon Valley on a rocky promontory overlooking San Francisco Bay stands California's oldest prison. Inmates here are cut off from the innovation the nearby high-tech industry produces. They are not permitted on the Internet, and most have never touched a smartphone or a tablet. But two technology veterans - Chris Redlitz and Beverly Parenti - are bringing the promise of Silicon Valley to San Quentin State Prison by creating a high-tech incubator here called the Last Mile.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Exactly what Google wants to do with the barges being built on both coasts are becoming a bit clearer. According to a new report, there will actually be three barges and they will be used as floating retail stores for Google's new Glass eyewear. They will cost a total of $35 million, according to the San Francisco Chronicle , which attributed the information to a budget report by Turner Construction Co., which is building the barges. The barges will be stationed in San Francisco, Los Angeles and New York, the Chronicle says.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | Associated Press
There are clams all over the bay, but not a one to eat. Scientists say that a year ago, a species of tiny clams believed to come from the Asian coast were discovered in San Francisco Bay. Now there are millions in the muck along the bottom. It's too early to determine if the clam might displace other species in the bay, said Jim Carlton of the University of Oregon, an authority on marine transplants.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Documents submitted to the Port of San Francisco have revealed new information and fantastic images of what the mystery Google barge will be. The barge in San Francisco Bay will be an "unprecedented artistic structure" that will be surrounded by gigantic sails, according to the San Francisco Chronicle, which was the first to obtain the port's documents for the floating edifice. The documents come from By And Large, the company associated with Google that is handling the construction of the barge.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
On Monday I wrote about my amateur sleuthing attempts to uncover the truth behind the Google Mystery Barge . (Spoiler alert: I failed. But did find some interesting clues.) But one of the fun things about this story is pondering just what the heck Google is doing. Because with Google, there's the feeling that it could be anything. WATCH: Unboxing the Google Nexus 5 smartphone [Video chat] Before I get to guesses that readers made, there's one aspect that came up in the reporting, but that I didn't discuss in the story.
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