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OPINION
November 7, 1999
Re "Reviving the San Joaquin River," editorial, Oct. 29: The collaboration between the Friant Water Users Authority and environmental groups is indeed a precedent-setting activity and a welcome prospect for the San Joaquin River and the San Francisco Bay Delta. However, at the same time that this collaboration is taking place, the San Joaquin Valley-based Westlands Water District wants to revive the defunct San Luis Drain proposal--the same one that caused the tragedy at Kesterson Wildlife Refuge.
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OPINION
August 29, 2005
Re "The fluid state of liquid politics," Opinion, Aug. 23 With a glass of home-filtered water, I toast Bruce Babbitt and Douglas Wheeler for pushing CalFed water projects. Putting politics aside, more can be achieved to equitably distribute water for California's environment, farming and cities. The issue of drinking water also needs to be addressed. Consumers, hesitant to drink water delivered to homes because of impurities and chemical additives, rely on producers of bottled water and home water-filtering systems to satisfy a basic human need.
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NEWS
June 7, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Environmentalists on Tuesday hammered a state plan to revamp the process by which it will reallocate water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, roughly two-thirds of the state's fresh water. The new process would govern the San Francisco Bay-Delta hearings, a years-long analysis that resulted last fall in a recommendation to cap water exports from Northern California to Southern California. Several powerful water agencies opposed that idea, which might have limited urban growth and agriculture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2002 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
The joint state and federal effort to restore the San Francisco Bay Delta -- the source of water for two-thirds of California's population -- suffered a setback last week when the 107th Congress adjourned without authorizing the so-called CalFed program.
OPINION
August 29, 2005
Re "The fluid state of liquid politics," Opinion, Aug. 23 With a glass of home-filtered water, I toast Bruce Babbitt and Douglas Wheeler for pushing CalFed water projects. Putting politics aside, more can be achieved to equitably distribute water for California's environment, farming and cities. The issue of drinking water also needs to be addressed. Consumers, hesitant to drink water delivered to homes because of impurities and chemical additives, rely on producers of bottled water and home water-filtering systems to satisfy a basic human need.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2002 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
The joint state and federal effort to restore the San Francisco Bay Delta -- the source of water for two-thirds of California's population -- suffered a setback last week when the 107th Congress adjourned without authorizing the so-called CalFed program.
NEWS
March 13, 1988
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Environmental Affairs Agency have announced an agreement to share the responsibility for management decisions on priority problems affecting the San Francisco Bay-Delta estuary. As a result, EPA Administrator Lee Thomas officially designated the estuary as part of the National Estuary Program established in the Water Quality Act of 1987.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1998
Re "Salton Sea Is Dead--Keep It That Way," Commentary, June 18: Ivan Colburn is right. Moreover, all public spending involves trade-offs. Congressional saviors of the Salton Sea might consider how many beneficial water-recycling projects to serve thirsty Southern California will be scrapped to find the funding for this harebrained idea. Perhaps we can find a more fitting monument to remember Sonny Bono than the Coachella/ Imperial Valley-fed agricultural holding pond (sewer) known as the Salton Sea. The delicate Mojave Desert environment cannot support even more recreational use than that which already exists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1985
The tenor of your editorial (May 13), "Healing Move on Water," precipitated my writing you on the subject. I agree that the federal government's appearing to agree to meet its obligations in the San Francisco Bay-Delta area is constructive. Unfortunately, the coordinated operating agreement has a "hole" in it that you can drive a division of Sherman tanks through side by side. Until that "hole" is plugged, Southern California's wish to complete the State Water Project is essentially non-existent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1987 | Jeffrey A. Perlman
Huntington Beach pharmacist Noble J. Waite has been unanimously elected chairman of the Water Advisory Committee of Orange County. The panel, created by the Coastal Municipal, Municipal and Orange County water district boards, coordinates regional water programs. The cities of Santa Ana, Anaheim and Fullerton also are represented on the committee.
OPINION
November 7, 1999
Re "Reviving the San Joaquin River," editorial, Oct. 29: The collaboration between the Friant Water Users Authority and environmental groups is indeed a precedent-setting activity and a welcome prospect for the San Joaquin River and the San Francisco Bay Delta. However, at the same time that this collaboration is taking place, the San Joaquin Valley-based Westlands Water District wants to revive the defunct San Luis Drain proposal--the same one that caused the tragedy at Kesterson Wildlife Refuge.
NEWS
June 7, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Environmentalists on Tuesday hammered a state plan to revamp the process by which it will reallocate water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, roughly two-thirds of the state's fresh water. The new process would govern the San Francisco Bay-Delta hearings, a years-long analysis that resulted last fall in a recommendation to cap water exports from Northern California to Southern California. Several powerful water agencies opposed that idea, which might have limited urban growth and agriculture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1989
The article by Reisner contains several misstatements with which we take issue. Its most serious flaw is that it would have us believe we are in the midst of a crisis and that the crisis has precipitated a war in which north is pitted against south, urban against rural. Reisner starts with the old contention that "too much water is already being diverted" from the San Francisco Bay/Delta and that we are witnessing the rape of that "great, priceless estuary." The alleged environmental catastrophe in San Francisco Bay is a figment of Reisner's imagination.
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