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San Francisco Bay Wildlife Refuge

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NEWS
September 27, 1988
Legislation to authorize the addition of 21,000 acres to the 23,000-acre San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge was passed by the House. The bill, sent to the Senate by voice vote, would authorize $60 million through 1992 to acquire land that the Interior Depar1953326446wildlife habitat or necessary to buffer the effect of development on the existing refuge.
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NEWS
September 27, 1988
Legislation to authorize the addition of 21,000 acres to the 23,000-acre San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge was passed by the House. The bill, sent to the Senate by voice vote, would authorize $60 million through 1992 to acquire land that the Interior Depar1953326446wildlife habitat or necessary to buffer the effect of development on the existing refuge.
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NEWS
January 22, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton announced a proposed $56.5-million increase for the national wildlife refuge system, an 18% hike she said is necessary to cover maintenance and renovation at the 538 refuges across the nation. The San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge would receive $1.1 million under the proposed budget that starts Oct. 1. The proposed increase would be the largest in seven years. This year's budget was $319 million.
TRAVEL
February 1, 1998 | JOHN McKINNEY
San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge is a big one, befitting the West Coast's most crucial bay and marsh tidewater, salt ponds and mudflats. At more than 23,000 acres, it's one of the nation's largest urban wildlife refuges, a critical habitat for more than 250 species of birds. Thirty miles of trail trace the bay shore. Some of these pathways use the tops of levees to cross mudflats and salt ponds.
NEWS
January 15, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Animal rights activists and federal authorities said Tuesday that the remains of latex and Mylar balloons have caused untold deaths among sea birds and mammals who choke on or get entangled in the airborne litter. The problem is "as big as the six-pack problem, where animals get caught in the plastic," said Rick Coleman, manager of the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge. "The sad thing is these deaths can be prevented."
OPINION
November 20, 1988
Aerial traffic is intense these days as millions of shore birds and waterfowl complete their winter migration to California under the anxious eyes of biologists trying to calculate the effect of the year's drought. A further decline in waterfowl is anticipated, with the population, 6 million just a few years ago, dwindling to 3 million last year, we learned from Edridge (Red) Hunt, chief of the state's Wildlife Management Division. The crucial census will come in January.
NEWS
October 13, 1994 | From The Times Washington Bureau
HOME FREE--Facing a 17-count felony indictment alleging embezzlement, fraud and conspiracy, Rep. Dan Rostenkowski (D-Ill.) has become a poster boy for Republicans seeking to tar Democratic incumbents with ethical indiscretions. Yet even as his name is invoked, "Rosty" appears to be cruising to reelection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2002 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State and federal officials today plan to announce a landmark $135-million deal to buy and begin restoration of 16,500 acres of salt ponds in the south San Francisco Bay. The tentative deal with Cargill Inc., an agricultural and industrial company, begins the largest wetlands restoration project in the state's history. It is designed to help nurse San Francisco Bay back to ecological health, eventually returning the saltwater evaporation ponds to tidal marshes for birds and fish.
NEWS
January 1, 1988 | JIM GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
Behind a barrier of barbed wire and dense shrubbery from which they have ventured out only once, President and Mrs. Reagan are passing a quiet New Year's holiday just as they have for each of the last 20 years--among longtime friends and political associates near this desert playground for the wealthy. Each day, a national security briefing--delivered in person when the President is in Washington but generally on paper when he is on vacation--is presented for Reagan to peruse.
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