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NEWS
March 29, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Maybe this is the debate the two Democratic candidates for governor promised. Not the old-fashioned, face-to-face stuff with live candidates in a spontaneous format--but television commercial vs. television commercial, each carefully scripted and produced by professionals. Atty. Gen. John K.
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TRAVEL
November 7, 1993 | LUCY IZON
For those willing to share dormitory rooms, the San Francisco International Hostel at Ft. Mason offers inexpensive lodging in a great location. It's on the waterfront in a park setting, just a short walk from Fisherman's Wharf, with a view of the Golden Gate Bridge. The best part: Rooms are just $13 per night.
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NEWS
November 1, 1990 | Elements of the ad with analysis by Times political writer Bill Stall
The race: Governor. Whose ads: Republican Pete Wilson. Cost: The campaign declines to disclose. Producers: Don Sipple and Larry McCarthy. Republican Sen. Pete Wilson began airing two new 30-second television commercials Wednesday, one of them promoting his promises for action if elected governor and the other attacking Democrat Dianne Feinstein's fiscal record as mayor of San Francisco.
NEWS
November 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A new report shows that the city of San Francisco is spending as much as a $250,000 a year more than necessary on planning and architecture. The report, released Wednesday by the city's budget analyst, shows that the city spent money on outside planners and architects for jobs that could be carried out by staff. The outside technicians cost as much as $25 an hour more than in-house employees.
NEWS
May 10, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Art Agnos, struggling with a projected $179.6-million municipal budget deficit, proposed a sweeping plan Monday to eliminate 1,089 city jobs and cut back public services, including police and fire protection and public transit. Mounted police would still patrol Golden Gate Park, but desk sergeants would be put out on street patrols, and four Fire Department trucks would be retired--a controversial move in a city of densely packed, wood-frame structures.
NEWS
November 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A new report shows that the city of San Francisco is spending as much as a $250,000 a year more than necessary on planning and architecture. The report, released Wednesday by the city's budget analyst, shows that the city spent money on outside planners and architects for jobs that could be carried out by staff. The outside technicians cost as much as $25 an hour more than in-house employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mayor Art Agnos has frozen city hiring after a report showed that the city will fall $20 million below budget projections by the end of the year. Only employees required by court order, state or federal law or other legal agreement will be hired, Agnos said in a memo to department heads. Agnos called the revenue shortfall "an early warning signal."
NEWS
June 15, 1988 | TODD J. GILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Art Agnos, facing a predicted $179.6-million budget deficit, said Tuesday that his staff has found a loophole to raise taxes by $20 million to $30 million, avoiding the need for massive cuts in police, fire and other services. Under an opinion by the city attorney, the city will no longer count court-ordered changes in services toward its Gann spending limit.
NEWS
July 18, 1988 | TODD J. GILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
Just six years ago, San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein presided over a luxurious $152-million budget surplus, the largest of any U.S. city. But the savings account ran dry about the same time Feinstein left office. Feinstein's successor, Art Agnos, has spent his first six months at City Hall wrestling with a $179.6-million deficit, the worst budget crisis in city history.
NEWS
July 27, 1988 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
The Board of Supervisors here Tuesday approved a belt-tightening, $1.9-billion budget that includes cuts and rate increases affecting everyone from cable car riders to art lovers and zoo and library patrons. The supervisors, in a meeting that began Monday afternoon and concluded at 2 a.m. Tuesday, approved most of Mayor Art Agnos' proposed cuts of $75 million and tax and fee increases totaling $61 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
San Francisco Mayor Frank Jordan has ordered each city department to cut 10% of its budget to close what he estimates could be a $150-million budget gap. Outgoing Mayor Art Agnos had forecast a $91-million shortage, but Jordan estimates the budget gap at closer to $120 million to $150 million. Jordan suggested that the cuts can be made at the bureaucratic level without reducing services. He asked department heads to submit proposals in six weeks. The cuts will take effect July 1.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Frank Jordan were superstitious, he might have seen an omen in his recent Hawaiian vacation. After his election as mayor, Jordan fled to Kauai for some post-campaign rest and sunshine but instead found an island awash in torrential rains and deadly floods. When Jordan returned home, a wimpy tan became the least of his worries. Picketers circled his headquarters, protesting plans for an inaugural party they deemed elitist. Critics called his 162-person transition team unwieldy.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | Elements of the ad with analysis by Times political writer Bill Stall
The race: Governor. Whose ads: Republican Pete Wilson. Cost: The campaign declines to disclose. Producers: Don Sipple and Larry McCarthy. Republican Sen. Pete Wilson began airing two new 30-second television commercials Wednesday, one of them promoting his promises for action if elected governor and the other attacking Democrat Dianne Feinstein's fiscal record as mayor of San Francisco.
NEWS
May 16, 1990 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, the situation seems like political dynamite: San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein is handed a $152.6-million budget surplus in 1982 and six years later leaves office with a $174.2-million deficit. Is this the kind of manager Californians want for governor? Atty. Gen. John Van de Kamp, running against Feinstein for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, thinks not--and made the point forcefully in Sunday's televised debate. "There is a word Mrs. Feinstein just can't use. . . .
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Maybe this is the debate the two Democratic candidates for governor promised. Not the old-fashioned, face-to-face stuff with live candidates in a spontaneous format--but television commercial vs. television commercial, each carefully scripted and produced by professionals. Atty. Gen. John K.
NEWS
January 22, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Budget analysts have made it clear that the financial aftershocks from the Oct. 17 earthquake will shape the city's revenues for years to come. In their first major report since the temblor, the city analysts estimated that the disaster has cost San Francisco as much as $15 million in lost revenue from sales, business, parking and hotel taxes. The city anticipated collecting $852 million in revenue overall and the money has already been budgeted.
NEWS
May 18, 1988
Almost 400 city employees will receive layoff notices this week as San Francisco Mayor Art Agnos works to trim a projected $179-million budget deficit. Provisional employees not covered by Civil Service will be the first to go, followed by workers within the Civil Service structure who have the least seniority, said Al Walker, secretary of San Francisco's Civil Service Commission. The Municipal Railway is expected to be the hardest hit, with 114 employees getting the ax.
NEWS
May 28, 1987
A record $1.95-billion city budget was proposed by San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein, who included pay raises for women and minority city employees as well as a 33% increase in the amount being spent to combat acquired immunity deficiency syndrome. The proposed 1987-88 budget submitted to the Board of Supervisors would be up 3.
NEWS
July 27, 1988 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
The Board of Supervisors here Tuesday approved a belt-tightening, $1.9-billion budget that includes cuts and rate increases affecting everyone from cable car riders to art lovers and zoo and library patrons. The supervisors, in a meeting that began Monday afternoon and concluded at 2 a.m. Tuesday, approved most of Mayor Art Agnos' proposed cuts of $75 million and tax and fee increases totaling $61 million.
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