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BUSINESS
December 18, 2004 | From Associated Press
The San Francisco Chronicle is switching publishers for the second time in 20 months, bringing in a hard-nosed executive who presided over a contentious newspaper labor strike in Detroit. Steven Falk left as the San Francisco paper's publisher Friday. He will be replaced Jan. 1 by Frank Vega, who runs the company that oversees the shared business operations of the Detroit Free Press and the Detroit News. Falk, 50, took over as Chronicle publisher in March 2003. Hearst Corp.
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BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Has class warfare come to the exclusive Silicon Valley enclave of Atherton? In the Lindenwood neighborhood, where average home prices exceed $7 million, vandals last week spray-painted black graffiti targeting the “1%” on walls, garage doors, a gate, a car, even white picket fences. "Most people think this is a one-time thing, but I wouldn't be surprised if security-camera companies are doing a lot of business right now," Vice Mayor Rick DeGolia told the San Francisco Chronicle . "I think everyone's hoping this doesn't happen again.
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NEWS
June 17, 1992
Abe Mellinkoff, 79, who was city editor of the San Francisco Chronicle for 26 years. He joined the Chronicle in 1935 as a reporter and became city editor in 1949. At the time of his death, he was a weekly columnist for the newspaper. On Thursday in San Francisco of a stroke.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- In a move to quiet the controversy surrounding tech-driven gentrification in San Francisco, Google has agreed to donate $6.8 million to the city to fund free bus passes for low- and middle-income kids. The donation was part of a deal brokered by Mayor Ed Lee, who is working to address the backlash against the technology industry from residents angry about the rapidly rising cost of living in San Francisco. The Internet giant will cover the projected cost of the program for two years.
NEWS
May 20, 2000 | Associated Press
The San Francisco Examiner is a financial failure and its profit-sharing deal has harmed newspaper readers by holding back its larger partner, the Chronicle Publishing Co. said in legal filings Friday. The owners of the Chronicle, whose $660-million purchase by the Hearst Corp. has been challenged in a federal antitrust trial, urged U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker not to block the deal.
NEWS
August 7, 1999 | TIM REITERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending decades of jockeying and rivalry between this city's two daily newspapers, the parent company of the San Francisco Examiner announced Friday that it is acquiring the San Francisco Chronicle and will put its own flagship paper up for sale. The sales accord between the Hearst Corp. and the Chronicle Publishing Co. would end a federally approved joint operating agreement that had preserved one of the country's most vibrant cities as a two-newspaper town for nearly 35 years.
NATIONAL
January 19, 2007 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
The new chairman of the House Judiciary Committee and an influential Republican congressman asked Atty. Gen. Alberto R. Gonzales on Thursday to withdraw grand jury subpoenas to two San Francisco Chronicle reporters facing 18 months in federal prison for refusing to disclose their confidential sources of information about steroid use in professional sports.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2005 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
When Jeffrey Zalles needed a new cashier for his coin laundry in the South of Market district, his help-wanted ad in the San Francisco Chronicle brought just four responses. So Zalles posted a notice on Craigslist, a San Francisco-based network of websites that specialize in classified advertising. His cyber-ad drew 400 applicants. Zalles found his cashier and hasn't relied on the Chronicle since, advertising instead on the Internet and the city's array of free papers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - David Perlman had two deadlines on his mind as he elbowed his way through the Exploratorium, cane in one hand, notebook in the other. As the San Francisco Chronicle's veteran science writer, Perlman has been covering the granddaddy of hands-on science museums since it was just a glimmer of an idea in the fertile mind of physicist Frank Oppenheimer, the "uncle of the atom bomb. " Now, after 43 years in the elegant but drafty Palace of Fine Arts, the museum was getting ready to close before moving to new digs on the Embarcadero, and it was Perlman's job to chronicle the last day in its original home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2002 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As other cities slashed cash payments to their homeless populations in recent years, San Francisco held out, living up to its national image as a city of compassion and tolerance. But buffeted by the dot-com collapse and other economic woes, many San Franciscans today see themselves as America's last soft touch. Some say the city's reputation for generosity has made it a magnet for street dwellers, whose numbers fluctuate between 7,000 and 10,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
George Lucas' hunt for a site for his "world-class museum for the future" recently took another turn after a trust for a highly coveted parkland in San Francisco nixed the proposal, offering an alternative location instead. The Presidio Trust rejected a site across from Crissy Field and instead have offered a spot near Lucas' Letterman Digital Arts Center in San Francisco. The planned 95,000-square-foot museum is designed to house Lucas' collection of Hollywood collectibles, Americana art and Norman Rockwell pieces, among others, that are valued at an estimated $1 billion combined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO -- A coalition of San Francisco supervisors will move today to place a tax of two cents per ounce on sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages on the November ballot, triggering what is expected to be a costly fight with opponents who aim to defeat it. If the measure were to pass, as much as $31 million in estimated annual proceeds from the "unified soda tax measure" would go to city and public school nutrition, health and physical activity...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez
Three teenage boys have admitted that they sexually assaulted a 15-year-old Northern California girl who later hanged herself after she discovered that cellphone photos had been taken of her after the incident, according to reports Wednesday by two news organizations. Audrie Pott was assaulted after she had been drinking at a Labor Day weekend party in 2012 at a friend's house in Saratoga, an upscale Silicon Valley suburb about 50 miles south of San Francisco. Two of the boys, both 16, also admitted in the Santa Clara County Juvenile Court proceeding to possessing photos of Pott, the San Francisco Chronicle reported . The other boy, 17, admitted to additional charges of having photos of other girls.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Tensions flared Friday as activists in San Francisco and Oakland blocked buses ferrying tech workers to their jobs in Silicon Valley. One bus was vandalized. This was the second wave of protests this month targeting the buses. San Francisco is split between young tech workers and those who say they are being pushed out of a city they can no longer afford. Apple, Facebook, Google and other major Silicon Valley companies deploy shiny fleets of unmarked coaches equipped with air conditioning, plush seats and wireless Internet access to ease the commutes of their workers.
NEWS
December 3, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
One question only: What side is Santa on? What does gingerbread mean to him - to you? A spicy, spongy cake? A spicy, slightly crispy cookie that dunks perfectly in eggnog? A piece of cardboard coated in decorative frosting? That's what San Francisco is fighting over right now: Can you call it “gingerbread” if you can't eat it? YEAR IN REVIEW: Ted Rall's five best cartoons of 2013 Is gingerbread a food, a building material or a metaphor? How did the evil facade of a fairy tale, a dream turned to homicide, the Wicked Witch's honey trap for Hansel and Gretel, the come-on maison de gingerbread, turn into a happy holidays symbol?
BUSINESS
December 2, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Exactly what Google wants to do with the barges being built on both coasts are becoming a bit clearer. According to a new report, there will actually be three barges and they will be used as floating retail stores for Google's new Glass eyewear. They will cost a total of $35 million, according to the San Francisco Chronicle , which attributed the information to a budget report by Turner Construction Co., which is building the barges. The barges will be stationed in San Francisco, Los Angeles and New York, the Chronicle says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
George Lucas' hunt for a site for his "world-class museum for the future" recently took another turn after a trust for a highly coveted parkland in San Francisco nixed the proposal, offering an alternative location instead. The Presidio Trust rejected a site across from Crissy Field and instead have offered a spot near Lucas' Letterman Digital Arts Center in San Francisco. The planned 95,000-square-foot museum is designed to house Lucas' collection of Hollywood collectibles, Americana art and Norman Rockwell pieces, among others, that are valued at an estimated $1 billion combined.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2007
The Hearst Corp. has recorded $330 million in losses in its investment in the San Francisco Chronicle and attempted to sell the newspaper to MediaNews Group Inc., according to court documents made public in a media antitrust case. Terms of the 2005 proposal were not revealed. MediaNews did not offer enough, so no deal was made.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2013 | By David Ng
George Lucas wants to build his new art museum featuring works from his personal collection at the Presidio in San Francisco. But officials at the famous site are pushing back, having asked the "Star Wars" creator and other competing projects to rethink their designs before a decision is made. On Thursday, the board of directors of the Presidio Trust met to decide on proposals for developing an eight-acre site across from Crissy Field. Among the proposals vying for physical space is Lucas' art museum as well as  a proposed science-themed center and a mixed-use complex from the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy.  "In the interest of having the best project possible for the Presidio, we want to provide one more opportunity for teams to adjust their proposals before we make a selection," said the board in an announcement released on Thursday.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
The cost of saving a city? For San Francisco, the tab for Batkid's heroic day is coming in at $105,000. Nearly 14,500 volunteers and adoring fans with signs turned out for 5-year-old Miles Scott, who has been battling lymphoblastic leukemia since he was 20 months old and wanted to spend the day as Batman. The Make-A-Wish Foundation , which planned the festivities, expected a few hundred volunteers to show up. But when thousands more arrived, Mayor Ed Lee's presentation of a chocolate key to the city was amped up with professional staging and big-screen TVs, bumping the cost to more than $105,000, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.
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