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NEWS
October 10, 1988 | AMY STEVENS, Times Staff Writer
Sixteen years after it opened, the Bay Area Rapid Transit system seemed headed for its first major expansion. After much political maneuvering, BART this month announced an ambitious plan to extend the state's largest regional rail system to the San Francisco Airport and further into the East Bay.
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NEWS
April 11, 1998 | MARIA L. La GANGA and STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge Friday upheld a landmark ordinance requiring companies that do business with the city to offer benefits to domestic partners of employees, but exempted airlines from the regulation. The ruling is the first significant legal hurdle passed by San Francisco's much-watched ordinance, which is unique in the nation and demands that domestic partners of unmarried employees be offered the same benefits extended to married workers' spouses.
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NEWS
December 28, 1989 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A federal judge has upheld the validity of San Francisco's contract preference system for minorities and women over a claim of reverse discrimination by white contractors. The challenged city ordinance provides preferences in bidding to minority and women construction contractors in the city. U.S. District Judge Thelton Henderson refused to issue a temporary restraining order to block enforcement of the law.
NEWS
November 9, 1996 | Associated Press
Businesses that contract with the city must extend health insurance and other benefits to the unmarried partners of their workers under legislation signed Friday by Mayor Willie Brown. The ordinance, which takes effect within six months, is expected to affect thousands of private companies doing business with the city. "It's really just a matter of fairness," said city Supervisor Leslie Katz, who introduced the legislation months ago with fellow Supervisor Tom Ammiano. Both are gay.
NEWS
August 24, 1987
The San Francisco district attorney's office will investigate allegations of illegal no-bid contracts awarded for more than $350,000 of asbestos removal from city schools. In addition, the office will look into more than $417,000 in other construction contracts that were not formerly bid as required by state law, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1987 | United Press International
The city will fight a judge's order that a clause banning discrimination against homosexuals be included in the contract covering Pope John Paul II's Mass at Candlestick Park on Friday. "We plan to oppose the order," Deputy City Atty. Mora Rosales said Friday after the order was issued by Superior Court Judge Daniel Hanlon in response to a suit by a homosexual group.
NEWS
November 9, 1996 | Associated Press
Businesses that contract with the city must extend health insurance and other benefits to the unmarried partners of their workers under legislation signed Friday by Mayor Willie Brown. The ordinance, which takes effect within six months, is expected to affect thousands of private companies doing business with the city. "It's really just a matter of fairness," said city Supervisor Leslie Katz, who introduced the legislation months ago with fellow Supervisor Tom Ammiano. Both are gay.
NEWS
April 11, 1998 | MARIA L. La GANGA and STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge Friday upheld a landmark ordinance requiring companies that do business with the city to offer benefits to domestic partners of employees, but exempted airlines from the regulation. The ruling is the first significant legal hurdle passed by San Francisco's much-watched ordinance, which is unique in the nation and demands that domestic partners of unmarried employees be offered the same benefits extended to married workers' spouses.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Motorola Inc., Swedish giant LM Ericsson and Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries share one thing that has put them on a collision course with a tough new law passed by the city of San Francisco. They're accused of doing business in a troubled Southeast Asian nation called Myanmar, which could jeopardize their bids for a $40-million emergency radio communications system and a $140-million light rail system for San Francisco International Airport.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | Times Staff Writer
Nurses employed by the city of San Francisco approved a tentative agreement with the city by a slim 320-307 margin, union officials announced late Wednesday. The nurses, whose pay was frozen as part of the city's budget cutbacks, won an 8% pay raise for 1989. "The closeness of the vote means that management will have the next year to straighten out the (staffing) situation at San Francisco General Hospital.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Motorola Inc., Swedish giant LM Ericsson and Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries share one thing that has put them on a collision course with a tough new law passed by the city of San Francisco. They're accused of doing business in a troubled Southeast Asian nation called Myanmar, which could jeopardize their bids for a $40-million emergency radio communications system and a $140-million light rail system for San Francisco International Airport.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A federal judge has upheld the validity of San Francisco's contract preference system for minorities and women over a claim of reverse discrimination by white contractors. The challenged city ordinance provides preferences in bidding to minority and women construction contractors in the city. U.S. District Judge Thelton Henderson refused to issue a temporary restraining order to block enforcement of the law.
NEWS
October 10, 1988 | AMY STEVENS, Times Staff Writer
Sixteen years after it opened, the Bay Area Rapid Transit system seemed headed for its first major expansion. After much political maneuvering, BART this month announced an ambitious plan to extend the state's largest regional rail system to the San Francisco Airport and further into the East Bay.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | Times Staff Writer
Nurses employed by the city of San Francisco approved a tentative agreement with the city by a slim 320-307 margin, union officials announced late Wednesday. The nurses, whose pay was frozen as part of the city's budget cutbacks, won an 8% pay raise for 1989. "The closeness of the vote means that management will have the next year to straighten out the (staffing) situation at San Francisco General Hospital.
NEWS
December 17, 1987
Congressional leaders agreed to open another major federal office building in San Francisco. No money was appropriated in language incorporated in a joint appropriation bill, but congressional budget writers directed federal officials to begin "a competitive selection process for the lease-purchase of a building in San Francisco."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1987 | United Press International
The city will fight a judge's order that a clause banning discrimination against homosexuals be included in the contract covering Pope John Paul II's Mass at Candlestick Park on Friday. "We plan to oppose the order," Deputy City Atty. Mora Rosales said Friday after the order was issued by Superior Court Judge Daniel Hanlon in response to a suit by a homosexual group.
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