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NEWS
February 15, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Mass court hearings were held Thursday for dozens of demonstrators as authorities began the task of prosecuting more than 1,500 people arrested last month in widely disruptive anti-war protests. Officials have taken unusual steps to streamline procedures to cope with a flood of court cases not seen--even in this dissent-minded city--since the campus protests of the late 1960s.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
Immigrants fighting deportation in San Francisco will no longer be shackled during most court hearings, according to a settlement reached with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The settlement, which received preliminary approval from a federal judge Thursday, is limited to San Francisco Immigration Court but could affect how immigrants are treated in other jurisdictions. People held at detention centers in the San Francisco area are transported to court shackled at the wrists, waist and ankles, attorneys for four immigrants wrote in a federal lawsuit filed in 2011.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1993 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An international construction management firm under FBI investigation for allegedly double-billing several government clients statewide failed to disclose business ties to South Africa when bidding to oversee the $92-million renovation of Los Angeles City Hall, officials said Tuesday. Lehrer McGovern Bovis, whose Los Angeles and Thousand Oaks offices were searched last week as part of a broad federal fraud investigation, declared in March that it does no business in South Africa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
Immigrants fighting deportation in San Francisco will no longer be shackled during most court hearings, according to a settlement reached with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The settlement, which received preliminary approval from a federal judge Thursday, is limited to San Francisco Immigration Court but could affect the way immigrants are treated in other jurisdictions. People held at detention centers in the San Francisco area are transported to court shackled at the wrists, waist and ankles, attorneys for four immigrants wrote in a federal lawsuit filed in 2011.
NEWS
March 30, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A cabdriver ordered to pay $24,595 to a mugger he caught by pinning him with his taxi will get a new day in court. Superior Court Judge Carlos Bea granted Holden Charles Hollom a new trial, saying the evidence contradicts the jury's finding that the cabdriver used excessive force. "I think that justice is regaining its balance and I eagerly look forward to a new trial where the jury can come to a true verdict," said Hollom, 51.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tuesday's massive earthquake has forced the state Supreme Court and the federal appeals court here to abandon damaged buildings and search frantically for temporary new quarters, officials said Friday. As a result, the two suddenly homeless courts have been required to adopt unusual interim procedures when they attempt to resume operations on a highly limited basis Monday. "The state (court) building will not be usable in the foreseeable future," Chief Justice Malcolm M.
NEWS
December 6, 1987
In an embarrassing legal snafu, a major San Francisco Bay Area cocaine dealer who had served only five months of a 45-year sentence in federal prison in Texas has accidentally been set free. Douglas Costa, 43, of Fairfax, Calif., was to appear in San Francisco Municipal Court to stand trial on additional drug charges involving the arrest three years ago of his son, but was released on bail by a judge who did not know he was a federal prisoner.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | STEPHANIE SIMON and DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS; Times staff writers Carlos V. Lozano and Jim Newton contributed to this story
Ventura County prosecutors and the FBI have launched a statewide investigation into an international construction management firm that allegedly overbilled clients for projects ranging from a $64-million performing arts center in Thousand Oaks to a new federal courthouse in San Francisco, The Times has learned. Federal search warrants were served this week on the Los Angeles and Thousand Oaks offices of Lehrer McGovern Bovis Inc.
NEWS
June 24, 1996 | TONY PERRY and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
This is a tale of two counties and three strikes, of how the distance between San Francisco and San Diego cannot be measured in mere miles when it comes to applying California's controversial sentencing law. "In San Francisco, you get caught with a rock of cocaine, and you probably get probation," says Thomas Whelan, a prosecutor for 20 years before being appointed to the San Diego County Superior Court bench in 1990.
NEWS
July 17, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The federal Environmental Protection Agency has asked the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals to reconsider its July 1 order that the EPA write a clean-air plan for the Los Angeles region that would go beyond regional smog-fighting measures. EPA attorneys wrote that the 9th Circuit Court should reopen arguments because "the proceeding involves a question of exceptional importance" regarding the division of responsibility among federal, state and local governments under the federal Clean Air Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2003 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
By an overwhelming vote of 93-0, the U.S. Senate on Monday confirmed San Francisco Superior Court Judge Carlos T. Bea to a position on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Bea, 69, had cleared the Senate Judiciary Committee by a 19-0 vote just a few days ago, paving the way for Monday's vote. Bea's confirmation means that President Bush has now placed four judges on the 9th Circuit, which has jurisdiction over cases from nine Western states, Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
A state appeals court in San Francisco refused to strike down a groundbreaking punitive damages verdict against tobacco giant Philip Morris but pared the award to an ex-smoker with lung cancer to $10.5 million from $26.5 million. The decision was the first in a California tobacco case to be influenced by a U.S. Supreme Court ruling in April that punitive damages in most cases should be no greater than nine times the amount of compensatory damages awarded.
NEWS
June 24, 1996 | TONY PERRY and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
This is a tale of two counties and three strikes, of how the distance between San Francisco and San Diego cannot be measured in mere miles when it comes to applying California's controversial sentencing law. "In San Francisco, you get caught with a rock of cocaine, and you probably get probation," says Thomas Whelan, a prosecutor for 20 years before being appointed to the San Diego County Superior Court bench in 1990.
NEWS
April 18, 1995 | From Times Staff Reports
A federal district judge has rejected state efforts to have Proposition 187 declared constitutional under state law. Instead, U.S. District Judge D. Lowell Jensen has decided to send a lawsuit filed on behalf of Gov. Pete Wilson to federal court in Los Angeles, where it presumably will be incorporated into a case scheduled for trial in September to determine the federal constitutionality of the illegal immigration initiative. Several weeks after voters approved the ballot measure in November, U.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1993 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An international construction management firm under FBI investigation for allegedly double-billing several government clients statewide failed to disclose business ties to South Africa when bidding to oversee the $92-million renovation of Los Angeles City Hall, officials said Tuesday. Lehrer McGovern Bovis, whose Los Angeles and Thousand Oaks offices were searched last week as part of a broad federal fraud investigation, declared in March that it does no business in South Africa.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | STEPHANIE SIMON and DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS; Times staff writers Carlos V. Lozano and Jim Newton contributed to this story
Ventura County prosecutors and the FBI have launched a statewide investigation into an international construction management firm that allegedly overbilled clients for projects ranging from a $64-million performing arts center in Thousand Oaks to a new federal courthouse in San Francisco, The Times has learned. Federal search warrants were served this week on the Los Angeles and Thousand Oaks offices of Lehrer McGovern Bovis Inc.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal energy officials may pursue Nevada as a potential national radioactive waste dump site, despite opposition from the state's Legislature, a federal appeals court ruled. Nevada lawmakers have attempted to block further consideration of the Yucca Mountain site, 100 miles northeast of Las Vegas, by withholding consent for environmental permits and passing joint resolutions in the Legislature in 1989 expressing "adamant opposition" to the repository.
NEWS
July 17, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The federal Environmental Protection Agency has asked the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals to reconsider its July 1 order that the EPA write a clean-air plan for the Los Angeles region that would go beyond regional smog-fighting measures. EPA attorneys wrote that the 9th Circuit Court should reopen arguments because "the proceeding involves a question of exceptional importance" regarding the division of responsibility among federal, state and local governments under the federal Clean Air Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Juvenile Court judge can order a youth's defense lawyer to disclose evidence to the prosecutor before trial, a state appeals court ruled. The 1st District Court of Appeal said a rule requiring defense disclosure--part of Proposition 115, a prosecution-sponsored initiative in June, 1990--does not apply to juvenile cases. But the court said the initiative gave juvenile judges authority to decide whether disclosure should be ordered.
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