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NEWS
June 21, 1987 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Forget the sun. Forget the North Pole. For one brief summer back in 1967, the world revolved around the intersection of Haight and Ashbury streets in San Francisco, the Hollywood and Vine of Hippiedom. It was the Summer of Love, a time when youth flowed to San Francisco hoping to remake the world with flowers, innocence and LSD. Much has changed since the "turn on, tune in and drop out" counterculture burst into the public consciousness 20 summers ago.
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TRAVEL
May 15, 2005 | Janet Eastman, Times Staff Writer
"Something wonderful and free is happening every day in this city," my friend Liz Polo said, carefully selecting a double-latte truffle from the silver tray. It was Saturday afternoon, and we were at Neiman Marcus on Union Square. We'd just come from a Chinese cooking lesson and were headed to an elegant lunch at the Four Seasons. "My philosophy is this," Liz added. "Have dessert first." Her point of view appealed to me.
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NEWS
August 16, 1996 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day, as she watches thousands of drivers nose their cars up the freeway onramp that curves just a few feet beyond the floor-to-ceiling windows of her downtown loft, Toni Lee counts herself lucky to be in San Francisco. "I love it," Lee, a graphic artist, says of living and working alongside the noisy, crowded sweep of concrete. "It is an urban forest. It captures the energy of this city." Energy. The word most commonly used these days when San Franciscans describe their city.
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's last two-newspaper city is poised to become a one-newspaper city, and the result is a civic free-for-all rife with celebrity bashing, a federal investigation, a state investigation, two city investigations, seething self-interest and a welter of resentments. The storied San Francisco Chronicle was sold this summer to the Hearst Corp., owner of its bitter rival of 100 years, the equally storied San Francisco Examiner.
NEWS
July 21, 1995 | DENNIS ROMERO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Francisco in 1965 was the best place in the world to be. --Hunter S. Thompson * Two sweaty, balding, 200-pound men in leather masks and super-hero underwear fling each other around a 20-foot- by-20-foot ring as an unsatisfied fan yells, "Where's the beef?" While the "The Unholy" slams opponent "R-U-R 2000" on his back, another worked-up fan screams, in vein-popping-football-coach voice, "Get up! Get up! you [expletive]!"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1990
From Saturday through Oct. 8, more than 200 performances and 50 attractions will be presented at 30 locations around the city. Screenings, exhibits and interdisciplinary performances involving 1,000 performing and visual artists crowd the schedule. The expected highlights include: "Praise House," a new piece by the New York dance-theater company Urban Bush Women drawn from the life of the rural Southern folk artist Minnie Evans. At Theater Artaud, Oct. 10-14.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A proposal for an arch emblazoned with the words "This Is a Nice Neighborhood" has received mixed reviews at its first public hearing. "We want to continue working with these artists," sculptor Anne Healy said after the Arts Commission hearing. Healy, head of the commission's visual arts committee, called the $500,000 proposal "brilliant" and "wonderful." Critics, however, outnumbered backers during the two-hour hearing.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | LARRY GREEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New Yorker William F. Noonan was a candidate for a San Francisco-based position with his public relations firm earlier this year. He didn't get it. "But if I was offered it tomorrow I'd still go," he said Wednesday--with the memory of Tuesday's earthquake still fresh. "I wouldn't go there next week," said Detroit attorney Michael Sharpe. "But after this situation has blown over, I wouldn't hesitate."
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the military vernacular used by his hymn-singing, check-writing "prayer warriors," a Texas television evangelist came and saw, but could not conquer. The Rev. Larry Lea sought to "exorcise sin" from San Francisco on Wednesday night, but had to do it from inside the Civic Center Auditorium while 1,500 vocal demonstrators chanted outside and San Francisco engaged in its usual raucous and lascivious Halloween festivities.
NEWS
January 9, 1988 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
After nine years of Dianne Feinstein's moderate politics, Art Agnos, a liberal former social worker, became this city's 39th mayor Friday with a Populist pledge to keep it from becoming an enclave for the rich. In his inaugural address in the ornate City Hall rotunda, Agnos echoed his campaign themes: affordable housing, protection of neighborhoods and small business, and fighting AIDS and homelessness.
NEWS
April 19, 1999 | VERONIQUE de TURENNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bicycling here is not for the faint of heart. You've got those urban Alps that residents sportingly call hills, wide boulevards dominated by speeding cars, neighborhoods riddled with bewildering warrens of one-way streets and a citywide obstacle course of potholes, grates, curbs and train and trolley tracks. Yet it's not enough to stop San Francisco's cyclists, a dazzlingly diverse and determined group.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day, as she watches thousands of drivers nose their cars up the freeway onramp that curves just a few feet beyond the floor-to-ceiling windows of her downtown loft, Toni Lee counts herself lucky to be in San Francisco. "I love it," Lee, a graphic artist, says of living and working alongside the noisy, crowded sweep of concrete. "It is an urban forest. It captures the energy of this city." Energy. The word most commonly used these days when San Franciscans describe their city.
NEWS
July 21, 1995 | DENNIS ROMERO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Francisco in 1965 was the best place in the world to be. --Hunter S. Thompson * Two sweaty, balding, 200-pound men in leather masks and super-hero underwear fling each other around a 20-foot- by-20-foot ring as an unsatisfied fan yells, "Where's the beef?" While the "The Unholy" slams opponent "R-U-R 2000" on his back, another worked-up fan screams, in vein-popping-football-coach voice, "Get up! Get up! you [expletive]!"
NEWS
January 26, 1995 | TONY PERRY and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Perched on their respective harbors, they are like civic jewels in the Golden State's crown, port cities of great beauty and great promise, cities that have remained livable while much of urban America appears in rapid decline.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1994 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Casual observers who check out the high-tech aluminum sign over Capp Street Project's door and peer through windows at a floor-to-ceiling display of three-inch-square paintings by Korean artist Ik-Joong Kang may think the intriguing new show space is nothing more than the latest addition to a burgeoning business district known as Multimedia Gulch. San Francisco's art crowd knows better. By moving to a renovated warehouse at 525 2nd St.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1992 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Wallace Berman's first solo exhibition was held at La Cienega Boulevard's fabled Ferus Gallery in June, 1957. It didn't last long. The Hollywood vice squad descended on the gallery shortly after the opening and arrested the 31-year-old artist on charges of displaying lewd and pornographic material. He was found guilty. Berman turned to the courtroom blackboard and scrawled: "There is no justice, only revenge." A friend, actor Dean Stockwell, paid the $150 fine.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
In San Francisco, the posh and proper restaurant Trader Vic's has always required men to wear jackets and ties. But customers balked, so several months ago it loosened the knot on its tie policy--although jackets are still a must. In Los Angeles, however, a far more laid-back Trader Vic's has never required jackets and ties. In fact, owners say, in Los Angeles it's tough enough just to keep some customers from wearing tennis shorts into the dining room.
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's last two-newspaper city is poised to become a one-newspaper city, and the result is a civic free-for-all rife with celebrity bashing, a federal investigation, a state investigation, two city investigations, seething self-interest and a welter of resentments. The storied San Francisco Chronicle was sold this summer to the Hearst Corp., owner of its bitter rival of 100 years, the equally storied San Francisco Examiner.
MAGAZINE
April 12, 1992 | Tom McNichol, Tom McNichol is a San Francisco writer. His last article for this magazine was on suicide prevention.
IN THE PIANO LOUNGES OF THE GRAND HOTELS PERCHED like sentries atop Nob Hill, "I Left My Heart in San Francisco" can still work its magic on a roomful of tourists. For a few luminous moments, every journeyman lounge lizard becomes Tony Bennett. Couples squeeze hands and exchange meaningful glances. The city high on a hill calls to everyone, shimmering like a splendid jewel. Then, too soon, the song is over.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A proposal for an arch emblazoned with the words "This Is a Nice Neighborhood" has received mixed reviews at its first public hearing. "We want to continue working with these artists," sculptor Anne Healy said after the Arts Commission hearing. Healy, head of the commission's visual arts committee, called the $500,000 proposal "brilliant" and "wonderful." Critics, however, outnumbered backers during the two-hour hearing.
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