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BUSINESS
July 8, 1988 | TODD J. GILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
The city has grown up around San Francisco's last sliver of agriculture. Passenger trains running through a half-mile tunnel built beneath the farm in 1907 rattle the herbs a bit. Exhaust from cars traveling the street--once a little-used dirt road--that runs by the farm has scarred the lettuce in the past. But until recently, it seemed that the three-acre Demattei family farm was resistant to the factors that closed down hundreds of other farms that once colored the city's landscape.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Construction is to begin on the proposed federal tower in downtown next summer, but the project is meeting a hostile reaction from the city. The 18-story tower would be 234 feet high but just 60 feet wide, with a 40-foot-by-60-foot hole in the middle. The building, which would house 1,700 employees, is designed to reduce energy consumption.
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NEWS
August 16, 1996 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day, as she watches thousands of drivers nose their cars up the freeway onramp that curves just a few feet beyond the floor-to-ceiling windows of her downtown loft, Toni Lee counts herself lucky to be in San Francisco. "I love it," Lee, a graphic artist, says of living and working alongside the noisy, crowded sweep of concrete. "It is an urban forest. It captures the energy of this city." Energy. The word most commonly used these days when San Franciscans describe their city.
NEWS
November 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
The fate of Proposition L, the city's grass-roots anti-growth measure, remained unclear Friday. It was trailing by seven votes with many absentee and provisional ballots left to count. "It's definitely too close to call," said Christiane Hayashi, communications manager for the city's Department of Elections. There were nearly 30,000 absentee and provisional ballots left to verify and count.
NEWS
September 23, 1988 | AMY STEVENS, Times Staff Writer
A five-alarm arson fire roared through San Francisco's colorful Haight-Ashbury district before dawn on Thursday, destroying a controversial convenience store development project and damaging 10 other structures. No one was injured in the blaze, which sparked bitter accusations by parties on both sides of a dispute over the commercial future of the neighborhood.
NEWS
February 3, 1988 | Associated Press
City officials, disturbed by "anarchy in the neighborhoods," temporarily banned demolition of all single-family homes, including some picturesque Victorians, effective Tuesday. The Board of Supervisors unanimously adopted the five-month moratorium despite claims it will cost construction jobs and new homes in a city known for scarce and expensive housing.
NEWS
June 15, 1999 | MARIA L. La GANGA and MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Filmmaker George Lucas won the right Monday to build a large-scale commercial development in the Presidio, a storied former Army base turned national park and one of this city's most coveted pieces of real estate. After months of intensive lobbying, Lucasfilm's Letterman Digital Arts Ltd. beat out a combined residential and office complex that would have included an Internet-based technology company. The winner will redevelop the site where the abandoned Letterman Military Hospital stands.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Payment Deadline Missed: Olympia & York Development Co. has failed to make the delivery deadline on a $2.3-million installment owed to the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency for a high-rise site. A spokesman for the firm in New York said the missed payment means the Redevelopment Agency could choose to cancel the developer's participation in the Yerba Buena project.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1993 | From Reuters
Canadian developer Olympia & York's option to build an office building on a prime San Francisco site lapsed after the deadline passed for the firm to complete the purchase of the site, officials said Tuesday. The financially troubled Olympia & York had for nine years held an option on a city center site that is zoned for a 40-story office tower, part of the Yerba Buena Center redevelopment district.
NEWS
April 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
San Francisco supervisors gave conditional approval to Mayor Art Agnos' plan to demolish the earthquake-damaged Embarcadero Freeway and replace it with a partially subterranean six-lane expressway. The 11-member board gave the mayor until Aug. 1 to address community concerns about the feasibility of such factors as federal financing of the $120-million expressway and traffic management during the four-year construction phase.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
Building a $1.25-billion international terminal around the nation's most delay-plagued airport less than three miles from the San Andreas fault presented a unique set of challenges. Now comes another one: opening it. Anyone doubting the difficulty should scan the archives of trade magazines such as Aviation Week and Space Technology using the keywords Kuala Lumpur, Milan, Oslo, Hong Kong and Denver. "Those are well-known disasters," says Jason Yuen, who chairs the project's advisory board.
NEWS
April 11, 2000 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For decades, when it came to baseball, "the City That Knows How" decidedly didn't. The hometown Giants turned in routinely sketchy performances on the field, while drawing only the hardiest fans to frigid, forlorn Candlestick Park. But the Stick has been abandoned by baseball, and San Franciscans are lining up in their tweedy splendor to christen a new downtown stadium that is stylish, intimate and exclusive--in short, all things that this city holds dear.
NEWS
October 26, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, Crissy Field served as the industrial back door for the U.S. Army at San Francisco's historic Presidio military base. Strewn with rubble, paved with more than 40 acres of asphalt and scarred by an elevated freeway separating it from the rest of the Presidio, the field graphically underscored the post's 200-year military history. By trashing the site, the Army turned its back on the breathtaking mile-and-a-half panorama of San Francisco Bay visible from its shores.
NEWS
September 12, 1999 | SAM BRUCHEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two of San Francisco's most intractable problems, parking and homelessness, crossed paths last week as the city's largest homeless shelter prepared to close its doors. On Sept. 15, the property housing the Mission Rock shelter will be returned to the San Francisco Giants and converted to a 5,000-space parking lot for the team's new stadium, Pacific Bell Park.
NEWS
June 15, 1999 | MARIA L. La GANGA and MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Filmmaker George Lucas won the right Monday to build a large-scale commercial development in the Presidio, a storied former Army base turned national park and one of this city's most coveted pieces of real estate. After months of intensive lobbying, Lucasfilm's Letterman Digital Arts Ltd. beat out a combined residential and office complex that would have included an Internet-based technology company. The winner will redevelop the site where the abandoned Letterman Military Hospital stands.
NEWS
June 10, 1999 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The signs are all here: Hard hats milling in the morning fog, chain-link stretched across upended pavement, pale blue portable toilets dotting the Embarcadero. This graceful city's waterfront is ground zero in a massive construction explosion, San Francisco's first building boom in 15 years. More than a score of projects--from a humble fishing pier and a face lift for tacky Fisherman's Wharf to the nation's first privately funded baseball stadium--dot the 7.5 miles of stunning shoreline.
NEWS
May 17, 1988
San Francisco Mayor Art Agnos asked the Navy to revise its plans for basing the battleship Missouri in his city, but the service's civilian chief declined any immediate endorsement of the idea. Navy Secretary William Ball "heard the mayor out, will study his proposals and get back to him at a later date," said Cmdr. Jeff Zakem, a spokesman.
NEWS
February 15, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A planned $525-million waterside stadium and mall complex, sold to voters last summer as a job- and revenue-generating bonanza, is in trouble. And city officials are blaming a family feud between owners of the San Francisco 49ers football team. Things began going wrong for the project last December, when Edward "Eddie" DeBartolo Jr., chairman of the 49ers, learned that he was the target of a federal investigation into the award of gaming licenses in Louisiana.
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The margin was slim and the final vote count still uncertain, but a jubilant Mayor Willie Brown declared victory Wednesday in the battle to build a $525-million stadium and mall complex for the San Francisco 49ers football team. "I said it would pass by 50.1%," Brown told reporters at a celebratory press conference. "I was wrong. It passed by 50.2%."
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