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San Francisco Development And Redevelopment

SPORTS
November 8, 1990 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bay Area future of the San Francisco Giants became clouded again Wednesday when tabulations showed that voters in five Santa Clara County communities had narrowly rejected a 1% utility tax that would have financed a 45,000-seat stadium for the Giants in Santa Clara. This was the third ballot rejection for the Giants in the last four years, following the refusal of San Francisco voters to approve a downtown stadium in 1987 and again in 1989.
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BUSINESS
November 2, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To build or not to build hotels on San Francisco's waterfront? That long-simmering issue, one of many facing the city's voters on Election Day, has provoked a storm of controversy for the beleaguered Port of San Francisco. The self-supporting agency, desperate for new sources of cash to fund freight shipping and fishing operations, has endorsed two projects with small hotels proposed for rundown piers south of Fisherman's Wharf.
NEWS
October 25, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As mayor of San Francisco, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Dianne Feinstein supported two major projects in which her husband's close associates had financial interests, according to records and interviews. In one project, she lobbied for the sale of land to the city for a new Marriott hotel, centerpiece in the biggest urban renewal effort of her Administration. The major representative for Marriott was a longtime friend and business partner of Feinstein's husband, money manager Richard C.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1990 | HARRY ANDERSON
The old news is that San Francisco is amid a long and painful economic decline. The jewel of the West is tarnished; the financial capital is tattered; the warehouse of the Pacific is closed. Jobs have fled to Walnut Creek and Vacaville and other points east, north and south. So what's the new news? San Francisco is reinventing itself economically, and it's beginning to look like . . . Los Angeles. It's now called the Bay Area economy, thank you very much, and it's doing quite well.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New allegations that the state attorney general campaign of San Francisco Dist. Atty. Arlo Smith manipulated a high-profile investigation for political ends have surfaced in court documents filed this week.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Port of San Francisco, criticized in years past for sloppy management and bungled opportunities, on Thursday released a long-awaited strategic plan calling for hefty investments in its money-losing cargo container facilities and outmoded fish-handling facilities. Unveiled at a news conference in the historic waterfront Ferry Building by Executive Director Michael P.
NEWS
April 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
San Francisco supervisors gave conditional approval to Mayor Art Agnos' plan to demolish the earthquake-damaged Embarcadero Freeway and replace it with a partially subterranean six-lane expressway. The 11-member board gave the mayor until Aug. 1 to address community concerns about the feasibility of such factors as federal financing of the $120-million expressway and traffic management during the four-year construction phase.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Environmental change--from polluted streams to congested highways and overdeveloped land--is affecting the quality of life across the nation. Such change is gradual, and often goes unnoticed while it happens. To measure how various areas have been affected over the decades, The Times dispatched reporters to the places where they grew up. This occasional series of articles examines how our hometown environments have been altered--for better or for worse.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
The president of the construction firm in charge of a building project where a 240-ton crane fell and killed five people here last November said Thursday that he was unaware of the extremely poor safety record of the subcontractor hired to operate the crane. The problem is "we don't deal with safety" records when it comes to hiring subcontractors, said David Grubb, president of Swinerton & Walberg, a large company with a good reputation for safety on its own.
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