Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSan Francisco Development And Redevelopment
IN THE NEWS

San Francisco Development And Redevelopment

NEWS
April 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
San Francisco supervisors gave conditional approval to Mayor Art Agnos' plan to demolish the earthquake-damaged Embarcadero Freeway and replace it with a partially subterranean six-lane expressway. The 11-member board gave the mayor until Aug. 1 to address community concerns about the feasibility of such factors as federal financing of the $120-million expressway and traffic management during the four-year construction phase.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Environmental change--from polluted streams to congested highways and overdeveloped land--is affecting the quality of life across the nation. Such change is gradual, and often goes unnoticed while it happens. To measure how various areas have been affected over the decades, The Times dispatched reporters to the places where they grew up. This occasional series of articles examines how our hometown environments have been altered--for better or for worse.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
The president of the construction firm in charge of a building project where a 240-ton crane fell and killed five people here last November said Thursday that he was unaware of the extremely poor safety record of the subcontractor hired to operate the crane. The problem is "we don't deal with safety" records when it comes to hiring subcontractors, said David Grubb, president of Swinerton & Walberg, a large company with a good reputation for safety on its own.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Art Agnos and the Santa Fe Pacific Realty Corp. are proposing the biggest single development project in this cramped city's history, hoping to win over the powerful slow-growth lobby with promises of affordable housing, a new waterfront park and an economic boom. Agnos planned to announce today details of the latest proposal to turn the Mission Bay area, a 315-acre tract of ragged industrial land a mile south of downtown, into a showplace. The land is owned by Santa Fe Pacific.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stung into awareness in the 1980s that it was no longer the undisputed financial grande dame of the West, San Francisco heads into the '90s with much of its gentility intact but with more of a team player mentality. Long regarded as a haughty isolationist, San Francisco is suddenly asking not what its region can do for it, but what it can do for the Bay Area, which has boomed even as the city's job and population growth have stagnated.
SPORTS
September 3, 1989
San Francisco has been virtually given half the land it needs for a proposed baseball stadium through a recent U.S. House of Representatives vote, according to a published report. The House, at the urging of city officials, last month waived $11 million in costs for a federally owned piece of land at the proposed 13-acre China Basin site, the San Francisco Examiner reported. The deal, in which the city would pay about $1 million for land worth about 12 times that much, must be approved by the U.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1988 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
Here's a dumb-sounding idea. Spend $67 million on an elegant store at a seedy, torn-up corner three rugged blocks from San Francisco's acknowledged retail center, tony Union Square, where Macy's, I. Magnin, Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus make their homes. Make people walk through a jungle of panhandlers, street musicians and sidewalk vendors to get there. Open in a mall that is still chaotic with construction work, has few other tenants as yet and offers no parking of its own.
NEWS
September 23, 1988 | AMY STEVENS, Times Staff Writer
A five-alarm arson fire roared through San Francisco's colorful Haight-Ashbury district before dawn on Thursday, destroying a controversial convenience store development project and damaging 10 other structures. No one was injured in the blaze, which sparked bitter accusations by parties on both sides of a dispute over the commercial future of the neighborhood.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1988 | TODD J. GILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
The city has grown up around San Francisco's last sliver of agriculture. Passenger trains running through a half-mile tunnel built beneath the farm in 1907 rattle the herbs a bit. Exhaust from cars traveling the street--once a little-used dirt road--that runs by the farm has scarred the lettuce in the past. But until recently, it seemed that the three-acre Demattei family farm was resistant to the factors that closed down hundreds of other farms that once colored the city's landscape.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|