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San Francisco Earthquakes

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NEWS
October 27, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK and MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When baseball tries again this afternoon to play the World Series at Candlestick Park, the image sent across the land by television cameras could help dictate how quickly the San Francisco area lures back the tourists essential to recovery from the deadly Oct. 17 earthquake. Conventions and tourists are crucial to the economy of San Francisco, which is no longer the financial center of the West Coast and has even lost its status as the Bay Area's largest city to San Jose.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2010 | By Ching-Ching Ni
For his children, the mystery surrounding Joe Yee's past started with his name. Growing up in Sacramento, Steve Yee, now 56, remembers piling into his father's big Pontiac Streamliner to visit the Ong family association. The group's members welcomed his father in a Cantonese dialect and addressed him as one of their own. But Joe Yee never explained to his six American-born children why, if he were part of the group, his last name was not Ong. Odder still, their father claimed to be an only son, with no surviving relatives in China or America.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2005 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
As Americans followed in horror the anarchy, looting and mounting death toll in the wake of the New Orleans flooding, California historians compared that city's devastation with another disaster of nearly a century ago: the San Francisco earthquake and fire of 1906. In both cases, they say, cities crucial to the U.S. economy of the era -- San Francisco's financial might and New Orleans' offshore oil reserves -- were hit by a natural disaster: one by an 8.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2010
Deborah Howell Veteran journalist Deborah Howell, 68, a former Washington Post ombudsman and veteran editor who helped lead two news organizations to three Pulitzer Prizes, died Saturday after being struck by a car while vacationing in New Zealand, stepson Nick Coleman said. Born in San Antonio, Howell was raised in Texas, where her father was a newspaper reporter, editor and broadcaster and her mother had been editor of her high school newspaper. Howell graduated from the University of Texas and worked for newspapers in the state before moving to Minnesota in 1965 to be a reporter and editor at the Minneapolis Star.
OPINION
April 16, 2006 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin, book editor of The Times, is the author of "The Myth of Solid Ground: Earthquakes, Prediction, and the Fault Line Between Reason and Faith."
CALIFORNIANS HAVE long been cavalier about history. Does anyone remember the McNamara brothers, Caryl Chessman, the collapse of the San Francisquito Canyon dam? No. In the phrase of social theorist Norman M. Klein, ours is a "history of forgetting," where more often than not, the past gets disregarded, overlooked. There is, however, a notable exception to the culture of erasure, one event we have never quite let slip away. This was the magnitude 7.
NEWS
September 1, 2002 | MICHAEL HILL, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
Bruce Stephan dodged death during the 1989 San Francisco earthquake when part of the Bay Bridge collapsed beneath his car. He resolved to change his life. Instead, he stayed on a frenetic career track that led to New York City -- and the World Trade Center. There, on Sept. 11, Stephan was working in one tower and his wife in the other when the hijacked planes struck. He escaped death again that day, as did his wife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1989 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For weeks after Hurricane Hugo pounded the coast of South Carolina, an unexpected gust of wind would cause rescue workers to freeze in their tracks. A month after the devastating Bay Area earthquake, reporter Lee Quarnstrom said the rumble from a truck outside his Santa Cruz home would make him jump and poise himself to run to the front door. And three years after a plane crash devastated her Cerritos neighborhood, the sound of a jet overhead causes Maria Santiago instinctively to look to see if the aircraft is headed up--or down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2010
Deborah Howell Veteran journalist Deborah Howell, 68, a former Washington Post ombudsman and veteran editor who helped lead two news organizations to three Pulitzer Prizes, died Saturday after being struck by a car while vacationing in New Zealand, stepson Nick Coleman said. Born in San Antonio, Howell was raised in Texas, where her father was a newspaper reporter, editor and broadcaster and her mother had been editor of her high school newspaper. Howell graduated from the University of Texas and worked for newspapers in the state before moving to Minnesota in 1965 to be a reporter and editor at the Minneapolis Star.
NEWS
June 21, 2001 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Disaster!" serves history and the reader ill. It opens with an account of the geology and geography of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake that is flat wrong. It closes with an estimate of the number of dead that stretches the truth until it is broken. And in between, as to the facts, who knows? Certainly Dan Kurzman has assembled every cliche ever penned about earthquakes and fires and dumped it here willy-nilly.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | SHANNON FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like millions of other Californians, Oxnard resident Jeanne LaFever never thought an earthquake would change her life as completely as did the Oct. 17 San Francisco temblor. That quake killed her 22-year-old son, Derek Van Alstyne, plunging LaFever into grief and then into earthquake preparedness as a full-time job. "Earthquakes didn't seem to have that much to do with me. But when this happened, I thought, 'What could be done to try and make some good come of this?'
OPINION
April 16, 2006 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin, book editor of The Times, is the author of "The Myth of Solid Ground: Earthquakes, Prediction, and the Fault Line Between Reason and Faith."
CALIFORNIANS HAVE long been cavalier about history. Does anyone remember the McNamara brothers, Caryl Chessman, the collapse of the San Francisquito Canyon dam? No. In the phrase of social theorist Norman M. Klein, ours is a "history of forgetting," where more often than not, the past gets disregarded, overlooked. There is, however, a notable exception to the culture of erasure, one event we have never quite let slip away. This was the magnitude 7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2005 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
As Americans followed in horror the anarchy, looting and mounting death toll in the wake of the New Orleans flooding, California historians compared that city's devastation with another disaster of nearly a century ago: the San Francisco earthquake and fire of 1906. In both cases, they say, cities crucial to the U.S. economy of the era -- San Francisco's financial might and New Orleans' offshore oil reserves -- were hit by a natural disaster: one by an 8.
NEWS
September 1, 2002 | MICHAEL HILL, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
Bruce Stephan dodged death during the 1989 San Francisco earthquake when part of the Bay Bridge collapsed beneath his car. He resolved to change his life. Instead, he stayed on a frenetic career track that led to New York City -- and the World Trade Center. There, on Sept. 11, Stephan was working in one tower and his wife in the other when the hijacked planes struck. He escaped death again that day, as did his wife.
NEWS
June 21, 2001 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Disaster!" serves history and the reader ill. It opens with an account of the geology and geography of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake that is flat wrong. It closes with an estimate of the number of dead that stretches the truth until it is broken. And in between, as to the facts, who knows? Certainly Dan Kurzman has assembled every cliche ever penned about earthquakes and fires and dumped it here willy-nilly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2001 | MARGIE MASON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Step inside 335 Marina Blvd. and marvel at the views. Marina Green buzzes with Frisbees across the street; Alcatraz and the Golden Gate Bridge loom just outside the living room windows. The three-story, four-bedroom Spanish Mediterranean home--complete with Jacuzzi and gazebo--is available for $3.4 million, a price that attracted several interested buyers during a recent open house. But there's a catch: The house is perched atop soil known to react like quicksand during an earthquake.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | SHANNON FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like millions of other Californians, Oxnard resident Jeanne LaFever never thought an earthquake would change her life as completely as did the Oct. 17 San Francisco temblor. That quake killed her 22-year-old son, Derek Van Alstyne, plunging LaFever into grief and then into earthquake preparedness as a full-time job. "Earthquakes didn't seem to have that much to do with me. But when this happened, I thought, 'What could be done to try and make some good come of this?'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2010 | By Ching-Ching Ni
For his children, the mystery surrounding Joe Yee's past started with his name. Growing up in Sacramento, Steve Yee, now 56, remembers piling into his father's big Pontiac Streamliner to visit the Ong family association. The group's members welcomed his father in a Cantonese dialect and addressed him as one of their own. But Joe Yee never explained to his six American-born children why, if he were part of the group, his last name was not Ong. Odder still, their father claimed to be an only son, with no surviving relatives in China or America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2001 | MARGIE MASON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Step inside 335 Marina Blvd. and marvel at the views. Marina Green buzzes with Frisbees across the street; Alcatraz and the Golden Gate Bridge loom just outside the living room windows. The three-story, four-bedroom Spanish Mediterranean home--complete with Jacuzzi and gazebo--is available for $3.4 million, a price that attracted several interested buyers during a recent open house. But there's a catch: The house is perched atop soil known to react like quicksand during an earthquake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1989 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For weeks after Hurricane Hugo pounded the coast of South Carolina, an unexpected gust of wind would cause rescue workers to freeze in their tracks. A month after the devastating Bay Area earthquake, reporter Lee Quarnstrom said the rumble from a truck outside his Santa Cruz home would make him jump and poise himself to run to the front door. And three years after a plane crash devastated her Cerritos neighborhood, the sound of a jet overhead causes Maria Santiago instinctively to look to see if the aircraft is headed up--or down.
NEWS
October 27, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK and MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When baseball tries again this afternoon to play the World Series at Candlestick Park, the image sent across the land by television cameras could help dictate how quickly the San Francisco area lures back the tourists essential to recovery from the deadly Oct. 17 earthquake. Conventions and tourists are crucial to the economy of San Francisco, which is no longer the financial center of the West Coast and has even lost its status as the Bay Area's largest city to San Jose.
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