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NEWS
October 27, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK and MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When baseball tries again this afternoon to play the World Series at Candlestick Park, the image sent across the land by television cameras could help dictate how quickly the San Francisco area lures back the tourists essential to recovery from the deadly Oct. 17 earthquake. Conventions and tourists are crucial to the economy of San Francisco, which is no longer the financial center of the West Coast and has even lost its status as the Bay Area's largest city to San Jose.
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NEWS
June 21, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are young, successful, fun-loving professionals who like to live in lofts, wear baseball caps and drive sport utility vehicles--and they are scaring the hell out of old-time San Franciscans. Buoyed by the bullish stock market and the ongoing Silicon Valley boom, yuppies are moving here in droves, looking for the good life.
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BUSINESS
January 15, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stung into awareness in the 1980s that it was no longer the undisputed financial grande dame of the West, San Francisco heads into the '90s with much of its gentility intact but with more of a team player mentality. Long regarded as a haughty isolationist, San Francisco is suddenly asking not what its region can do for it, but what it can do for the Bay Area, which has boomed even as the city's job and population growth have stagnated.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1998 | Bloomberg News
California legislators asked the state attorney general to investigate why gasoline prices in San Francisco and San Diego are 15 to 20 cents a gallon higher than in Los Angeles and other parts of the state and 25 to 40 cents higher than the U.S. average. The Assembly passed a resolution asking Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren to look into reasons for the regional price differences to determine whether oil companies and refiners are operating fairly. The state's effort comes a month after Chevron Corp.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day, as she watches thousands of drivers nose their cars up the freeway onramp that curves just a few feet beyond the floor-to-ceiling windows of her downtown loft, Toni Lee counts herself lucky to be in San Francisco. "I love it," Lee, a graphic artist, says of living and working alongside the noisy, crowded sweep of concrete. "It is an urban forest. It captures the energy of this city." Energy. The word most commonly used these days when San Franciscans describe their city.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1998 | Bloomberg News
California legislators asked the state attorney general to investigate why gasoline prices in San Francisco and San Diego are 15 to 20 cents a gallon higher than in Los Angeles and other parts of the state and 25 to 40 cents higher than the U.S. average. The Assembly passed a resolution asking Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren to look into reasons for the regional price differences to determine whether oil companies and refiners are operating fairly. The state's effort comes a month after Chevron Corp.
NEWS
January 22, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Budget analysts have made it clear that the financial aftershocks from the Oct. 17 earthquake will shape the city's revenues for years to come. In their first major report since the temblor, the city analysts estimated that the disaster has cost San Francisco as much as $15 million in lost revenue from sales, business, parking and hotel taxes. The city anticipated collecting $852 million in revenue overall and the money has already been budgeted.
NEWS
October 3, 1989
The proposed new stadium for the San Francisco Giants could bring the city up to $2.7 billion in revenues over 40 years, in a best-case projection, and it would come out $500,000 ahead at worst, according to an economic study released by the mayor's office. If the stadium is constructed, the study concluded, the most likely totals over 40 years would be $823 million in revenues and city costs totaling $62.8 million.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the United States began cranking up its military machine before World War II, Alameda sprang into being. Now a pleasant bay-side community with scores of renovated Victorians and a serene, 1950s feel, it came of age as a Navy town just south of Oakland. With the coming closure of the Alameda Naval Air Station and a key tenant, the Alameda Naval Aviation Depot--and the eventual loss of about 8,700 military and civilian jobs--the city of 80,000 faces dramatic changes.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day, as she watches thousands of drivers nose their cars up the freeway onramp that curves just a few feet beyond the floor-to-ceiling windows of her downtown loft, Toni Lee counts herself lucky to be in San Francisco. "I love it," Lee, a graphic artist, says of living and working alongside the noisy, crowded sweep of concrete. "It is an urban forest. It captures the energy of this city." Energy. The word most commonly used these days when San Franciscans describe their city.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the United States began cranking up its military machine before World War II, Alameda sprang into being. Now a pleasant bay-side community with scores of renovated Victorians and a serene, 1950s feel, it came of age as a Navy town just south of Oakland. With the coming closure of the Alameda Naval Air Station and a key tenant, the Alameda Naval Aviation Depot--and the eventual loss of about 8,700 military and civilian jobs--the city of 80,000 faces dramatic changes.
MAGAZINE
April 12, 1992 | Tom McNichol, Tom McNichol is a San Francisco writer. His last article for this magazine was on suicide prevention.
IN THE PIANO LOUNGES OF THE GRAND HOTELS PERCHED like sentries atop Nob Hill, "I Left My Heart in San Francisco" can still work its magic on a roomful of tourists. For a few luminous moments, every journeyman lounge lizard becomes Tony Bennett. Couples squeeze hands and exchange meaningful glances. The city high on a hill calls to everyone, shimmering like a splendid jewel. Then, too soon, the song is over.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | PETER H. KING
He rises each Monday before the sun, gulps down some vitamins, grabs a suit bag and hurries off to catch the first flight to Los Angeles. He goes to Los Angeles because that is where the money is or, more precisely, because San Francisco is where the money is not. "San Francisco has wealth," he says, " . . . but Los Angeles has cash." He is a friend--we'll call him Wally--and he belongs to that vague subspecies of entrepreneur known as The Consultant. His current client is an L.A.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mitch Lowe figures that the recession finally came to this woodsy, affluent Marin County town about February--months after it hit most other parts of the country. That was when customers' checks at his video rental store began bouncing at a record pace. Across town, shoppers at the upscale Mill Valley Market have been switching from prime rib to hamburger.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bruising triple whammy has humbled the decorous grande dame of destinations. First, as San Francisco's nearly $4-billion tourism business was headed for a banner year in 1989, the October earthquake sent visitors and locals scurrying for cover, and they didn't emerge for months. As memories of the tremor were fading, the recession kicked in.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1987 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
This city "epitomizes the post-industrial, service-based economy" and should continue to prosper despite its diminished role as a site for corporate headquarters, according to a study released on Tuesday by Wells Fargo Bank. "Most cities would give their eye teeth for San Francisco's economic prospects," contended Joseph Wahed, Wells Fargo's chief economist.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Economic aftershocks of the collapse of the Cypress freeway in the Oct. 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake are still being felt, according to a report to be issued Monday by transportation and economic experts. The report calculates the closure of the 1 1/2-mile freeway, which linked downtown Oakland with the San Francisco Bay Bridge, has cost $22.5 million to date in added travel times for motorists, higher vehicle operating costs and delays in shipments of products.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Economic aftershocks of the collapse of the Cypress freeway in the Oct. 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake are still being felt, according to a report to be issued Monday by transportation and economic experts. The report calculates the closure of the 1 1/2-mile freeway, which linked downtown Oakland with the San Francisco Bay Bridge, has cost $22.5 million to date in added travel times for motorists, higher vehicle operating costs and delays in shipments of products.
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