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NEWS
March 12, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal by two of the city's school board members that more than half of the books high school students are required to read be by nonwhite authors has engulfed the district in a storm of criticism. Board members Steve Phillips and Keith Jackson, who are African Americans, say that they want to ensure that the high school reading list reflects the makeup of racially and culturally diverse San Francisco, where only 13% of the students are white and the largest ethnic group is Chinese.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Board of Education voted Thursday in Sacramento to allow a controversial charter school run here by the for-profit Edison Schools Inc. to reopen under state control after summer vacation. After three years of acrimony, the San Francisco Board of Education voted two weeks ago to sever most of its ties with the Edison Charter Academy, which operated in the city's upscale Noe Valley neighborhood.
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NEWS
March 21, 1998 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confronted by hundreds of angry students, teachers and parents demanding that the school curriculum be diversified, the school board voted unanimously to require that nonwhite authors be taught in the city's high schools. "We are now the first district in the nation to require the reading of nonwhite authors," said school board member Jill Wynns. "We also voted for a requirement that writers who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender be identified."
NEWS
March 21, 1998 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confronted by hundreds of angry students, teachers and parents demanding that the school curriculum be diversified, the school board voted unanimously to require that nonwhite authors be taught in the city's high schools. "We are now the first district in the nation to require the reading of nonwhite authors," said school board member Jill Wynns. "We also voted for a requirement that writers who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender be identified."
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Jaime Escalante, the East Los Angeles educator whose rigorous math teaching inspired the movie "Stand and Deliver," received the 1990 American Education Award. Escalante, who last week announced he is leaving his teaching job at Garfield High School, was honored Saturday by the American Assn. of School Administrators.
NEWS
February 7, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Nobel Prize-winning cancer researcher Dr. J. Michael Bishop was appointed Friday as chancellor of UC San Francisco. The choice, unanimously approved by the University of California Board of Regents, marks the first time a laboratory scientist, rather than a practicing physician or dentist, has been named to run the San Francisco campus, one of the nation's most prestigious medical research centers.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In a radical bid to rejuvenate troubled schools, education officials here plan to remove the entire staffs at three problem campuses--teachers, cafeteria workers, everybody--and start over from scratch. If a federal court gives approval, as expected, for the "reconstitution" plan at the low-achieving schools, the three principals and about 200 other staff members could be transferred to schools throughout San Francisco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Board of Education voted Thursday in Sacramento to allow a controversial charter school run here by the for-profit Edison Schools Inc. to reopen under state control after summer vacation. After three years of acrimony, the San Francisco Board of Education voted two weeks ago to sever most of its ties with the Edison Charter Academy, which operated in the city's upscale Noe Valley neighborhood.
NEWS
October 21, 1987
Alexander S. Kohanski, 85, a prominent Jewish educator, author and editor. Before retiring to Southern California in 1983, Kohanski, a native of Lithuania, had been director of the League for Labor Palestine, editor of publications for the American Jewish Conference and executive director of the San Francisco Jewish Education Society.
NEWS
June 23, 1985 | THOMAS MURPHY, Associated Press
The idea of corporate support for public schools is nothing new in the Bay Area, where a program encouraging corporate involvement began in 1979 and has become a model for similar projects around the country. The effort got under way after a state report showed that many districts were struggling along without help from their communities. A group of concerned citizens reacted by establishing the San Francisco Educational Fund.
NEWS
March 12, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal by two of the city's school board members that more than half of the books high school students are required to read be by nonwhite authors has engulfed the district in a storm of criticism. Board members Steve Phillips and Keith Jackson, who are African Americans, say that they want to ensure that the high school reading list reflects the makeup of racially and culturally diverse San Francisco, where only 13% of the students are white and the largest ethnic group is Chinese.
NEWS
February 7, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Nobel Prize-winning cancer researcher Dr. J. Michael Bishop was appointed Friday as chancellor of UC San Francisco. The choice, unanimously approved by the University of California Board of Regents, marks the first time a laboratory scientist, rather than a practicing physician or dentist, has been named to run the San Francisco campus, one of the nation's most prestigious medical research centers.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In a radical bid to rejuvenate troubled schools, education officials here plan to remove the entire staffs at three problem campuses--teachers, cafeteria workers, everybody--and start over from scratch. If a federal court gives approval, as expected, for the "reconstitution" plan at the low-achieving schools, the three principals and about 200 other staff members could be transferred to schools throughout San Francisco.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Jaime Escalante, the East Los Angeles educator whose rigorous math teaching inspired the movie "Stand and Deliver," received the 1990 American Education Award. Escalante, who last week announced he is leaving his teaching job at Garfield High School, was honored Saturday by the American Assn. of School Administrators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Times Orange County staff writer is among 12 American journalists who have received Nieman Fellowships to study at Harvard University next school year. Environmental writer Deborah Schoch will join Patrick McDonnell--a Times staff writer in Los Angeles--and 10 other newspaper and radio reporters from around the nation in 10 months of advanced study at Harvard. The appointments were announced Tuesday by the university.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2007 | From the Associated Press
California Atty. Gen. Jerry Brown jumped into the burgeoning student loan scandal Tuesday by demanding that two finance companies turn over details of their business deals with state colleges and universities. Brown said he sent letters to San Francisco-based Education Finance Partners Inc. and San Diego-based Student Loan Xpress to determine if the lenders made unlawful payments to the institutions.
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