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BUSINESS
March 5, 2002 | Associated Press
The San Francisco Examiner plans to become a tabloid in an effort to make readers "perk up and take notice" of the newspaper, which has been marked by management upheaval since an ownership change in late 2000. The switch from the industry's more common broadsheet format should occur by mid-May, according to a staff memo from Examiner Executive Editor Zoran Basich. The new format "will emphasize our editorial strengths and cause [San Francisco] to perk up and take notice," Basich wrote.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2013
Raul Ramirez Award-winning investigative journalist Raul Ramirez, 67, an investigative newspaper journalist who went on to help build a prominent Northern California public radio news operation, died Friday at home in Berkeley, said San Francisco radio station KQED, where he was executive director of news and public affairs. The cause was esophageal cancer, the station said. Ramirez joined KQED in 1991 after working as a reporter and editor at several newspapers, including the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Miami Herald and San Francisco Examiner.
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NEWS
September 30, 1993
David E. Halvorsen, former editor of the San Francisco Examiner who had chaired the California Freedom of Information Committee, died Wednesday at the age of 60. Halvorsen, who had suffered from an inoperable brain tumor, died at his home in San Francisco. He served as editor of the Bay Area paper from 1982 to 1985 and was its managing editor for the previous six years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
The demise of the Hearst newspaper empire in Los Angeles began in 1962 when publisher George Randolph Hearst Jr. abandoned the morning newspaper market. Hearst and the company that owned the Los Angeles Times made what some viewed as a back-room deal: At almost the same time, they folded editions that directly competed with each other. A sister paper of The Times, the afternoon daily Mirror, stopped publishing while the Hearst Corp. "merged" the morning Examiner with the afternoon Herald-Express.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2004 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
In a surprising move, billionaire Philip Anschutz announced Thursday that he was buying the San Francisco Examiner, two other small Bay Area papers and a printing plant, adding publishing to a burgeoning portfolio of holdings that includes telecommunications, sports teams, real estate and movie theaters.
SPORTS
January 31, 1990
Bob Brenly, 35, former catcher with the San Francisco Giants, signed to become a radio announcer for the Chicago Cubs, the San Francisco Examiner reported.
NEWS
February 3, 1989
A federal monitor said the San Francisco Police Department has fallen far short of its anti-discrimination hiring goals and should hire 80% racial minority group members and 50% women for the next four years, the San Francisco Examiner reported. Monitor Nathaniel Trives said the court-ordered desegregation plan has failed to meet expectations, in part because of the city's policies, and needs to be stepped up, the newspaper reported.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1985
David Halvorsen, who until May was editor of the San Francisco Examiner, has been named executive editor of the Sparks Group of newspapers in Hayward, according to the company. Halvorsen succeeds David Fiedler, who has joined the corporate offices of Garden State Newspapers, the New Jersey-based firm that bought the Daily Review and three other San Francisco Bay Area newspapers on July 1.
NEWS
February 4, 1988
A San Francisco high school football player who was the victim of a broomstick hazing attack by his teammates will be tried for allegedly stabbing a gay neighbor to death two months later. The 17-year-old youth was ordered at a hearing to appear in Juvenile Court for trial Feb. 23, the San Francisco Examiner reported. The unidentified youth is charged with manslaughter with a deadly weapon, a knife, the paper said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Paul Hemphill, 73, a journalist and novelist who wrote about sports, country music and the haunted legacy of the South, died Saturday of oral cancer at a hospice in Atlanta. In the 1960s, before he turned to writing books, Hemphill was a much admired newspaper columnist in Atlanta and was sometimes called the Jimmy Breslin of the South. He left newspapers behind in 1970 when he wrote a best-selling book about country music, "The Nashville Sound: Bright Lights and Country Music," but he never quite recaptured his early success.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2009 | JAMES RAINEY
When a newspaper goes belly up, journalists tend to talk about the loss of a government watchdog, declining civic engagement and the threat to our democracy. So when those sober words came flowing out of Denver last week over the collapse of the Rocky Mountain News, the sentiments didn't strike me as surprising, or wrong. Just inadequate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2006 | John M. Glionna and Lee Romney, Times Staff Writers
This city awoke before sunrise Tuesday to mark the 100th anniversary of its darkest hour -- a deadly early-morning earthquake that killed more than 3,000 and left half the city homeless. As the first strains of dawn colored the sky, thousands gathered at Lotta's Fountain on Market Street to observe a moment of silence for those who perished and to honor the survivors of the April 18, 1906, temblor, one of the worst natural disasters in the nation's history.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2006 | Christopher Miles, Special to The Times
Too much often is made of biography in attempts to pinpoint origins of an artist's work, but in the case of Alexander Calder, known for his mobiles, "stabiles" and kinetic works made of wire, sheet metal and other materials, tracing biography feels like watching destiny unfold.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2004 | AL MARTINEZ
Those of us who manage to stay alive longer than we probably should, become witnesses to the deaths of many who have passed through our years. Among the more colorful who ventured through mine was Thomas G. Flynn, one of the most affable and mercurial men I have ever met. Flynn died of heart failure a few days ago at age 67 or 69, depending on whose obituary you read, leaving a wife and five children, all of whose first names begin with the letter K: Kelly, Ken, Kimberly, Kathleen and Karen.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2004 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
In a surprising move, billionaire Philip Anschutz announced Thursday that he was buying the San Francisco Examiner, two other small Bay Area papers and a printing plant, adding publishing to a burgeoning portfolio of holdings that includes telecommunications, sports teams, real estate and movie theaters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2003 | John M. Glionna and David Streitfeld, Times Staff Writers
The San Francisco Examiner, a once-fabled newspaper that has been struggling to survive in the shadow of the dominant Chronicle, fired most of its editorial staffers Friday, but planned to continue publishing. The 25-cent tabloid will probably be offered for free, dismissed employees say they were told. The Examiner, which had about 40 employees, now will be assisted by reporters from two weekly publications that also are owned by Publisher Florence Fang. She could not be reached for comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2002 | Rone Tempest, Times Staff Writer
SAN FRANCISCO -- Baseball-smitten Southlanders who arrived in drizzly San Francisco Tuesday for the third game of the World Series found themselves in a decidedly depressed town. The dot-com bust has the city in the doldrums. And in what may be the first such campaign sponsored by a local hotel industry, 33 billboards on major streets urge action against the city's aggressive panhandlers and homeless population.
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