Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSan Francisco Federal Aid
IN THE NEWS

San Francisco Federal Aid

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federally ordered random drug testing for San Francisco transit workers has been blocked by a Superior Court judge, days after an Alameda County judge made a similar ruling. San Francisco Superior Court Judge John Dearman issued a temporary restraining order prohibiting random tests of about 2,500 municipal railway workers until Jan. 5, when a hearing is scheduled on labor unions' request for a longer-lasting preliminary injunction.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1996 | BETTINA BOXALL and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Consider two people with AIDS. One lives in San Francisco, the other in Los Angeles. The federal government will spend more than twice as much on the care and treatment of the San Francisco resident as on the Angeleno. That gap, based on a complex funding formula, is at the heart of an intensely political and protracted effort to change the way federal money for AIDS care is distributed to cities.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
With a lot of cooperation and money from the federal government, San Francisco could have a replacement for the earthquake-damaged Embarcadero Freeway open by 1995, said Mayor Art Agnos. The city will be seeking full federal funding for the project. Agnos announced at a City Hall news conference that Caltrans now estimates it would cost $69.5 million to repair the closed freeway.
NEWS
January 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
With a lot of cooperation and money from the federal government, San Francisco could have a replacement for the earthquake-damaged Embarcadero Freeway open by 1995, said Mayor Art Agnos. The city will be seeking full federal funding for the project. Agnos announced at a City Hall news conference that Caltrans now estimates it would cost $69.5 million to repair the closed freeway.
NEWS
January 20, 1988
San Francisco Supervisor Harry Britt was arrested after he chained himself to a door of a federal building to protest lack of federal financing for AIDS research. "People have reached a point of anger where nothing less than civil disobedience is the answer," said Britt, who was among 15 arrested during a protest organized by the AIDS/ARC Vigil. Britt is the city's highest ranking gay official. Federal police used a bolt cutter to dislodge the chain from the door.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Racing against a midnight deadline, Congress approved a record $3.45-billion earthquake relief package for California on Wednesday and sent it to the White House as part of a stopgap spending bill to keep the federal government in business through Nov. 15. The package, which emerged from the Senate with $600 million more than the House originally approved, was expected to be signed into law by President Bush as soon as it reaches his desk.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hundreds of expectant earthquake victims lined up for federal aid Sunday as seven disaster assistance centers opened throughout the Bay Area, but most went home empty-handed and disappointed after learning that financial help could still be a week or more away. Although some people showed up hours before the centers' 1 p.m. opening time, crowds at most relief stations were lighter than expected.
NEWS
October 25, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON and CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One week to the day after Bay Area quake, the region lurched toward normal as commuters battled another siege of rain squalls, workers began demolishing the Nimitz Freeway--the quake's biggest killer--and officials raised fears that more damage, from mudslides, was on the way. Underscoring the impact of the destructive quake, seismologists who have been studying it round the clock announced that the quake actually measured 7.1, roughly twice the strength of 6.9 magnitude originally assessed.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The lucky ones spent Sunday at ease, walking in the park or watching the 49ers in the sunshine, but for many thousands in the Bay Area last week's earthquake strengthened its grip on their lives--and threatened new torments this morning as commuters try to return to work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1996 | BETTINA BOXALL and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Consider two people with AIDS. One lives in San Francisco, the other in Los Angeles. The federal government will spend more than twice as much on the care and treatment of the San Francisco resident as on the Angeleno. That gap, based on a complex funding formula, is at the heart of an intensely political and protracted effort to change the way federal money for AIDS care is distributed to cities.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federally ordered random drug testing for San Francisco transit workers has been blocked by a Superior Court judge, days after an Alameda County judge made a similar ruling. San Francisco Superior Court Judge John Dearman issued a temporary restraining order prohibiting random tests of about 2,500 municipal railway workers until Jan. 5, when a hearing is scheduled on labor unions' request for a longer-lasting preliminary injunction.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Racing against a midnight deadline, Congress approved a record $3.45-billion earthquake relief package for California on Wednesday and sent it to the White House as part of a stopgap spending bill to keep the federal government in business through Nov. 15. The package, which emerged from the Senate with $600 million more than the House originally approved, was expected to be signed into law by President Bush as soon as it reaches his desk.
NEWS
October 25, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON and CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One week to the day after Bay Area quake, the region lurched toward normal as commuters battled another siege of rain squalls, workers began demolishing the Nimitz Freeway--the quake's biggest killer--and officials raised fears that more damage, from mudslides, was on the way. Underscoring the impact of the destructive quake, seismologists who have been studying it round the clock announced that the quake actually measured 7.1, roughly twice the strength of 6.9 magnitude originally assessed.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hundreds of expectant earthquake victims lined up for federal aid Sunday as seven disaster assistance centers opened throughout the Bay Area, but most went home empty-handed and disappointed after learning that financial help could still be a week or more away. Although some people showed up hours before the centers' 1 p.m. opening time, crowds at most relief stations were lighter than expected.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The lucky ones spent Sunday at ease, walking in the park or watching the 49ers in the sunshine, but for many thousands in the Bay Area last week's earthquake strengthened its grip on their lives--and threatened new torments this morning as commuters try to return to work.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal and state officials moved quickly Wednesday to help earthquake-stricken Northern California dig itself out and begin to rebuild freeways, bridges, businesses and homes damaged or destroyed by what was probably the nation's deadliest quake since 1906. Promising to "take every step and make every effort" to help the Bay Area, President Bush declared the region a disaster area and authorized what could total hundreds of millions of dollars in federal assistance.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush pledged swift federal assistance Tuesday night to areas devastated by the Northern California earthquake and dispatched Transportation Secretary Samuel K. Skinner to San Francisco to coordinate the federal response. Bush also dispatched an Air Force plane to Rhein-Main Air Base outside Frankfurt, West Germany, to bring Gov. George Deukmejian back to the state. The governor had been in Frankfurt on a trade mission.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush pledged swift federal assistance Tuesday night to areas devastated by the Northern California earthquake and dispatched Transportation Secretary Samuel K. Skinner to San Francisco to coordinate the federal response. Bush also dispatched an Air Force plane to Rhein-Main Air Base outside Frankfurt, West Germany, to bring Gov. George Deukmejian back to the state. The governor had been in Frankfurt on a trade mission.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|