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BUSINESS
September 3, 1988 | Leslie Berkman, Times staff writer
National Health Care Systems, an Irvine-based prepaid dental care plan, anticipates a 50% boost in annual revenue from a contract it has been awarded to provide dental service to 44,000 employees of the County and City of San Francisco. The contract, approved earlier this week by the San Francisco County Board of Supervisors, will generate revenue of more than $2 million a year, the company said. In 1987 National Health Care Systems lost $212,000 on revenue of $4 million.
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NEWS
June 27, 2000 | From Associated press
Feral cats like quail. So does San Francisco supervisor Leslie Katz, who introduced a resolution at the Board of Supervisors meeting here Monday to name the California quail the city's official bird. The resolution was inspired by a local organization's effort to bring the city's quail population back from the brink of extinction. The organization, known as Save the Quail, says cats that roam in Golden Gate Park are the reason for the quail decline.
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NEWS
June 27, 2000 | From Associated press
Feral cats like quail. So does San Francisco supervisor Leslie Katz, who introduced a resolution at the Board of Supervisors meeting here Monday to name the California quail the city's official bird. The resolution was inspired by a local organization's effort to bring the city's quail population back from the brink of extinction. The organization, known as Save the Quail, says cats that roam in Golden Gate Park are the reason for the quail decline.
NEWS
April 30, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind a sheet of plastic, where her office once stood, Brenda Lopez's dream of a modern kitchen for the child-care center she directs in the city's Visitacion Valley is finally coming true. For nearly three decades, the Visitacion Valley Family School, which serves 210 children at two sites, has made do with a kitchen so small that its two cooks sometimes trip over each other.
NEWS
April 30, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind a sheet of plastic, where her office once stood, Brenda Lopez's dream of a modern kitchen for the child-care center she directs in the city's Visitacion Valley is finally coming true. For nearly three decades, the Visitacion Valley Family School, which serves 210 children at two sites, has made do with a kitchen so small that its two cooks sometimes trip over each other.
NEWS
June 17, 1996 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Willie Brown is hot these days. On the street, people treat him more like a movie star than a mayor, coming up to shake his hand or get his autograph. Diners applaud when he walks into a restaurant. TV hosts from David Brinkley to David Letterman put him on the air. Five months after becoming San Francisco's first black mayor, the former Democratic Assembly speaker remarkably remains the object of adulation.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1991 | From Associated Press
There's nothing like a little bad press to get local politicians steamed. Mayor Art Agnos and city supervisors are fuming over a Forbes magazine article that ridicules city policies as anti-business. The article, appearing in the Sept. 2 issue, lambastes the city's "wacky economics," including new business taxes and "the nation's most draconian building regulations." Author John H.
NEWS
November 22, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Proclaiming San Francisco "well on its way toward recovery," Mayor Art Agnos declared an end to the city's state of emergency that lasted for 36 days after the disastrous earthquake. "The immediate needs of earthquake victims have now been met, and there is no longer any reason to bypass the normal processes of city government, which are based on public discussion and full participation by the Board of Supervisors," Agnos said. A state of emergency, declared Oct.
NEWS
December 10, 1987
Assemblyman Art Agnos, a former social worker whose Populist mayoral campaign overcame long odds, vowed to be an unorthodox mayor after his resounding victory over a San Francisco City Hall insider. The 49-year-old Democratic state legislator and self-described liberal climaxed a savvy eight-month campaign by defeating John Molinari, president of the Board of Supervisors, with 70% percent of the vote.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Frank Jordan were superstitious, he might have seen an omen in his recent Hawaiian vacation. After his election as mayor, Jordan fled to Kauai for some post-campaign rest and sunshine but instead found an island awash in torrential rains and deadly floods. When Jordan returned home, a wimpy tan became the least of his worries. Picketers circled his headquarters, protesting plans for an inaugural party they deemed elitist. Critics called his 162-person transition team unwieldy.
NEWS
September 27, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guinea Apollos, in the polite terms of San Francisco's homeless advocates, is a "vehicularly housed resident." In the less polite terms of the police, she is someone living illegally in a car on city streets. To be precise, in Apollos' case, the vehicle is a 1964 school bus purchased three years ago when her monthly disability check could no longer cover the rent on her small San Francisco apartment. Apollos has painted her bus flat black and shares it with a large, lazy cat named Sydney.
NEWS
June 17, 1996 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Willie Brown is hot these days. On the street, people treat him more like a movie star than a mayor, coming up to shake his hand or get his autograph. Diners applaud when he walks into a restaurant. TV hosts from David Brinkley to David Letterman put him on the air. Five months after becoming San Francisco's first black mayor, the former Democratic Assembly speaker remarkably remains the object of adulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1995 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City officials from throughout Orange County have been looking forward all week to the chilly San Francisco fog and the fresh sourdough bread awaiting them as the annual League of California Cities conference begins today. But some critics contend the officials are in a mental fog as well. They are miffed that city leaders from the bankruptcy-stricken county are spending taxpayers' money on what they consider a junket.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Frank Jordan were superstitious, he might have seen an omen in his recent Hawaiian vacation. After his election as mayor, Jordan fled to Kauai for some post-campaign rest and sunshine but instead found an island awash in torrential rains and deadly floods. When Jordan returned home, a wimpy tan became the least of his worries. Picketers circled his headquarters, protesting plans for an inaugural party they deemed elitist. Critics called his 162-person transition team unwieldy.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1991 | From Associated Press
There's nothing like a little bad press to get local politicians steamed. Mayor Art Agnos and city supervisors are fuming over a Forbes magazine article that ridicules city policies as anti-business. The article, appearing in the Sept. 2 issue, lambastes the city's "wacky economics," including new business taxes and "the nation's most draconian building regulations." Author John H.
NEWS
November 22, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Proclaiming San Francisco "well on its way toward recovery," Mayor Art Agnos declared an end to the city's state of emergency that lasted for 36 days after the disastrous earthquake. "The immediate needs of earthquake victims have now been met, and there is no longer any reason to bypass the normal processes of city government, which are based on public discussion and full participation by the Board of Supervisors," Agnos said. A state of emergency, declared Oct.
NEWS
December 9, 1987 | MARK A. STEIN and DANA NICHOLS, Times Staff Writer
Liberal Assemblyman Art Agnos breezed to victory by a 2-to-1 margin over city Supervisor John L. Molinari in their runoff race Tuesday for mayor of San Francisco. With 395 of 711 precincts counted, Agnos had 67,369 votes, or 69%, to Molinari's 29,352. Voter turnout--estimated at 36%--was hampered by rains early in the day and further discouraged by opinion polls indicating an Agnos landslide in his bid to succeed Mayor Dianne Feinstein. She is barred from a third four-year term.
NEWS
June 5, 1988
Alameda Mayor Chuck Corica said his campaign to bring the battleship Missouri to the Bay Area city has been dealt a "bitter" setback by Barbara Thomas, his chief political ally on the City Council. "I'm really upset, and I don't know what her motives are," he said. Corica had planned to ask the council to adopt a resolution asking the Navy to base the Missouri at Alameda Naval Air Station if San Francisco does not accept it.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1988 | Leslie Berkman, Times staff writer
National Health Care Systems, an Irvine-based prepaid dental care plan, anticipates a 50% boost in annual revenue from a contract it has been awarded to provide dental service to 44,000 employees of the County and City of San Francisco. The contract, approved earlier this week by the San Francisco County Board of Supervisors, will generate revenue of more than $2 million a year, the company said. In 1987 National Health Care Systems lost $212,000 on revenue of $4 million.
NEWS
June 5, 1988
Alameda Mayor Chuck Corica said his campaign to bring the battleship Missouri to the Bay Area city has been dealt a "bitter" setback by Barbara Thomas, his chief political ally on the City Council. "I'm really upset, and I don't know what her motives are," he said. Corica had planned to ask the council to adopt a resolution asking the Navy to base the Missouri at Alameda Naval Air Station if San Francisco does not accept it.
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