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NEWS
April 20, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city government here is poised to become the first in California to require that many departments hire workers who speak either Spanish or Chinese, in an effort to provide services to a fast-growing population of immigrants not proficient in English. With census figures showing that 35% of this East Bay city's residents are Asian or Latino, the City Council is scheduled to vote Tuesday on whether to make all departments that have contact with the public hire bilingual employees.
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NEWS
May 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
The Board of Supervisors voted Monday to pay for sex changes for city employees. The measure would pay up to $50,000 in benefits to city workers who want to switch their gender. The bill, approved 9 to 2, awaits the signature of Mayor Willie Brown. The benefit, available starting July 1, would cover male-to-female surgery, which costs about $37,000, as well as female-to-male surgery, about $77,000.
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NEWS
December 23, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federally ordered random drug testing for San Francisco transit workers has been blocked by a Superior Court judge, days after an Alameda County judge made a similar ruling. San Francisco Superior Court Judge John Dearman issued a temporary restraining order prohibiting random tests of about 2,500 municipal railway workers until Jan. 5, when a hearing is scheduled on labor unions' request for a longer-lasting preliminary injunction.
NEWS
April 20, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city government here is poised to become the first in California to require that many departments hire workers who speak either Spanish or Chinese, in an effort to provide services to a fast-growing population of immigrants not proficient in English. With census figures showing that 35% of this East Bay city's residents are Asian or Latino, the City Council is scheduled to vote Tuesday on whether to make all departments that have contact with the public hire bilingual employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mayor Art Agnos has frozen city hiring after a report showed that the city will fall $20 million below budget projections by the end of the year. Only employees required by court order, state or federal law or other legal agreement will be hired, Agnos said in a memo to department heads. Agnos called the revenue shortfall "an early warning signal."
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A widow is fighting for full pension benefits despite regulations that disqualified her because her husband died 18 hours before his official retirement. Letty Catchings is asking a San Francisco Superior Court commissioner to grant the full $12,000 in annual pension benefits earned by her late husband, Harry, during his 37-year career with the city's Municipal Railway system.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | Times Staff Writer
Nurses employed by the city of San Francisco approved a tentative agreement with the city by a slim 320-307 margin, union officials announced late Wednesday. The nurses, whose pay was frozen as part of the city's budget cutbacks, won an 8% pay raise for 1989. "The closeness of the vote means that management will have the next year to straighten out the (staffing) situation at San Francisco General Hospital.
NEWS
May 18, 1988
Almost 400 city employees will receive layoff notices this week as San Francisco Mayor Art Agnos works to trim a projected $179-million budget deficit. Provisional employees not covered by Civil Service will be the first to go, followed by workers within the Civil Service structure who have the least seniority, said Al Walker, secretary of San Francisco's Civil Service Commission. The Municipal Railway is expected to be the hardest hit, with 114 employees getting the ax.
NEWS
February 3, 1989
A federal monitor said the San Francisco Police Department has fallen far short of its anti-discrimination hiring goals and should hire 80% racial minority group members and 50% women for the next four years, the San Francisco Examiner reported. Monitor Nathaniel Trives said the court-ordered desegregation plan has failed to meet expectations, in part because of the city's policies, and needs to be stepped up, the newspaper reported.
NEWS
February 26, 1989
For the first time in San Francisco history, street sweepers who work areas inhabited by encampments of homeless people are being accompanied by police. "You've got to think, what's this city coming to when you've got to come down and guard the street sweepers," said San Francisco police Officer Dennis Quinn.
NEWS
September 23, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal charges filed against 25 people for alleged involvement in a public housing bribery scandal became fodder Wednesday for Mayor Willie Brown's election opponents, who have repeatedly accused the mayor of presiding over a corrupt administration.
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A widow is fighting for full pension benefits despite regulations that disqualified her because her husband died 18 hours before his official retirement. Letty Catchings is asking a San Francisco Superior Court commissioner to grant the full $12,000 in annual pension benefits earned by her late husband, Harry, during his 37-year career with the city's Municipal Railway system.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mayor Art Agnos has frozen city hiring after a report showed the city's budget will fall $20 million below projections by the end of the year. Only employees required by court order, state or federal law or other legal agreement will be hired, Agnos said in a memo to department heads. Agnos called the revenue shortfall "an early warning signal." The softening real estate market accounted for a large portion of the shortage, said Controller Sam Yockey.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federally ordered random drug testing for San Francisco transit workers has been blocked by a Superior Court judge, days after an Alameda County judge made a similar ruling. San Francisco Superior Court Judge John Dearman issued a temporary restraining order prohibiting random tests of about 2,500 municipal railway workers until Jan. 5, when a hearing is scheduled on labor unions' request for a longer-lasting preliminary injunction.
NEWS
December 19, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gardeners and other city workers who tend San Francisco's Golden Gate Park say crime and filth make their jobs dangerous, and they are seeking a crackdown on transients. Park workers--who have drawn up a petition asking for strict enforcement of park rules, especially those against camping--say they often find drug paraphernalia, feces and bloody clothing. They also say transients threaten them. "I just pruned and found three needles. You've got to have eyes behind your head.
NEWS
July 31, 1989
Palo Alto, the city that reimburses its employees 7 cents a mile to ride bikes to work, has taken steps to encourage commuter use of the skateboard. With passage of a controversial ordinance, the city is permitting skateboards on all but 25 of its busiest streets. The move has thrilled skateboarders--many cities, including nearby San Francisco, make skateboarding illegal-- but is unpopular with bicyclists, who fought for years to develop a bike trail system on Palo Alto streets.
NEWS
July 5, 1989
Asian-Americans make up 28% of the San Francisco government's professional work force but hold 11% of the administrative positions, according to a new study. In its report, the Chinese for Affirmative Action organization charged that Asian-Americans have the worst promotional opportunities of any ethnic group in the city's civil service system.
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