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NEWS
July 16, 1991 | JOHN BOUDREAU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the night of July 17, 1944, Seaman 1st Class Robert Routh settled into his top bunk in a barrack at the Port Chicago Naval Magazine, about 30 miles east of Oakland. The 19-year-old had skipped leave in San Francisco to write letters, do laundry and save money for a trip home. In a nearby barrack, Seaman 1st Class Joseph Small stretched out after an exhausting day of dockside duty.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Port of San Francisco has become the first West Coast seaport to install monitors that screen imported cargo for radiation emanating from nuclear devices, such as dirty bombs. Officials from U.S. Customs and Border Protection said they plan to install the radiation portal monitors at all seaports, land border ports and airports across the country. The two monitors, operated by customs officers, screen trucks as they exit the pier and turn red if they detect radiation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Port of San Francisco has become the first West Coast seaport to install monitors that screen imported cargo for radiation emanating from nuclear devices, such as dirty bombs. Officials from U.S. Customs and Border Protection said they plan to install the radiation portal monitors at all seaports, land border ports and airports across the country. The two monitors, operated by customs officers, screen trucks as they exit the pier and turn red if they detect radiation.
NEWS
June 10, 1999 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The signs are all here: Hard hats milling in the morning fog, chain-link stretched across upended pavement, pale blue portable toilets dotting the Embarcadero. This graceful city's waterfront is ground zero in a massive construction explosion, San Francisco's first building boom in 15 years. More than a score of projects--from a humble fishing pier and a face lift for tacky Fisherman's Wharf to the nation's first privately funded baseball stadium--dot the 7.5 miles of stunning shoreline.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To build or not to build hotels on San Francisco's waterfront? That long-simmering issue, one of many facing the city's voters on Election Day, has provoked a storm of controversy for the beleaguered Port of San Francisco. The self-supporting agency, desperate for new sources of cash to fund freight shipping and fishing operations, has endorsed two projects with small hotels proposed for rundown piers south of Fisherman's Wharf.
NEWS
June 23, 1998 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A seemingly ordinary transport ship is scheduled to steam into California waters next month, carrying a decidedly extraordinary cargo--highly radioactive nuclear waste from Asia. From the shores of the choppy San Francisco Bay, the load will travel by train 918 miles through densely populated cities, several narrow canyons and onward to Idaho, where it will come to rest at a federal storage site.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Port of San Francisco, criticized in years past for sloppy management and bungled opportunities, on Thursday released a long-awaited strategic plan calling for hefty investments in its money-losing cargo container facilities and outmoded fish-handling facilities. Unveiled at a news conference in the historic waterfront Ferry Building by Executive Director Michael P.
NEWS
June 10, 1999 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The signs are all here: Hard hats milling in the morning fog, chain-link stretched across upended pavement, pale blue portable toilets dotting the Embarcadero. This graceful city's waterfront is ground zero in a massive construction explosion, San Francisco's first building boom in 15 years. More than a score of projects--from a humble fishing pier and a face lift for tacky Fisherman's Wharf to the nation's first privately funded baseball stadium--dot the 7.5 miles of stunning shoreline.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, American President Lines took delivery on five Gargantuan, high-speed container ships intended to set new standards for Pacific Ocean transportation of everything from auto parts to VCRs to sneakers. For its first U.S.
OPINION
July 12, 2006
The story "Feeling the Squeeze" (July 9) quotes various yacht brokers and harbor designers and developers cheerleading for supersized boats costing millions of dollars, all of which eliminate marina space and boat slips for smaller, lower-cost ocean recreation craft for the general public. All of these cheerleaders profit from the conversion of public marinas to luxury playgrounds. The story borders on outrageous with the quote by San Francisco harbor developer Brad Gross criticizing the California Coastal Commission for seeking to preserve smaller boat slips and accommodations (calling it unjustified "social engineering")
NEWS
June 23, 1998 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A seemingly ordinary transport ship is scheduled to steam into California waters next month, carrying a decidedly extraordinary cargo--highly radioactive nuclear waste from Asia. From the shores of the choppy San Francisco Bay, the load will travel by train 918 miles through densely populated cities, several narrow canyons and onward to Idaho, where it will come to rest at a federal storage site.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, American President Lines took delivery on five Gargantuan, high-speed container ships intended to set new standards for Pacific Ocean transportation of everything from auto parts to VCRs to sneakers. For its first U.S.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | JOHN BOUDREAU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the night of July 17, 1944, Seaman 1st Class Robert Routh settled into his top bunk in a barrack at the Port Chicago Naval Magazine, about 30 miles east of Oakland. The 19-year-old had skipped leave in San Francisco to write letters, do laundry and save money for a trip home. In a nearby barrack, Seaman 1st Class Joseph Small stretched out after an exhausting day of dockside duty.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To build or not to build hotels on San Francisco's waterfront? That long-simmering issue, one of many facing the city's voters on Election Day, has provoked a storm of controversy for the beleaguered Port of San Francisco. The self-supporting agency, desperate for new sources of cash to fund freight shipping and fishing operations, has endorsed two projects with small hotels proposed for rundown piers south of Fisherman's Wharf.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Port of San Francisco, criticized in years past for sloppy management and bungled opportunities, on Thursday released a long-awaited strategic plan calling for hefty investments in its money-losing cargo container facilities and outmoded fish-handling facilities. Unveiled at a news conference in the historic waterfront Ferry Building by Executive Director Michael P.
SPORTS
May 25, 2002 | From staff reports
Teams from the Pacific Coast Interscholastic Sailing Assn., led by Coronado (Calif.) High's defending champions, swept the first four places in the Mallory Cup National Doublehanded Championships earlier this at the Treasure Island Sailing Center in San Francisco. Newport Harbor and Santa Barbara finished third and fourth, followed by Milton (Mass.) Academy and Tabor Academy of Marion, Mass. The fifth PCISA entry, Bishop's School of La Jolla, was seventh.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1999
Beginning today and continuing on Fridays through January 2000, National Public Radio's "All Things Considered" presents "Lost & Found Sound," a series of stories and sonic snapshots capturing 20th century American life through recorded sound. Two segments inaugurate the series. The first, lasting 20 minutes, explores how the spirit, the inventions and the recordings of near-deaf inventor Thomas Alva Edison permeate the culture.
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