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NEWS
July 3, 1993 | JENIFER WARREN and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The security guards figured he was just another well-heeled lawyer. He wore a dark suit with suspenders, carried an attache case and towed a large leather bookcase strapped to a dolly. But when his elevator stopped on the 34th floor, Gian Luigi Ferri slung two guns over his shoulders, grabbed a satchel full of ammunition and headed straight for the conference room of the law firm of Pettit & Martin, where he shot four people he had never met, who happened to be there by a fluke.
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SPORTS
August 28, 2008 | From the Associated Press
New York 6, at Philadelphia 3: Daniel Murphy hit a tiebreaking double after Carlos Delgado's second solo homer had tied the score in the eighth, and the Mets reclaimed first place in the NL East. at Houston 4, Cincinnati 1: Roy Oswalt limited the Reds to five hits in seven innings and Hunter Pence and Ty Wigginton hit two-run homers to help Oswalt beat the Reds for the 22nd time in 23 decisions. Florida 4, at Atlanta 1: Josh Johnson threw a four-hitter for the first complete game of his career, and Dan Uggla hit his 28th homer for the Marlins.
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NEWS
May 22, 1999 | From Associated Press
It was a great twist on Haight-Ashbury hippie history--the house where drug-plagued rocker Janis Joplin once lived was being turned into a drug rehab center. Just one problem--she really lived in the house next door. The San Francisco Chronicle told the dramatic story Thursday, complete with corroboration from such '60s musical luminaries as Country Joe McDonald, who was Joplin's beau back then and briefly lived with her in the Lyon Street house--whichever one it was.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2006 | Lynn Doan, Times Staff Writer
For 20 years, actor George D. Wallace kept three pieces of paper folded in an envelope tucked inside his desk. He had used the notes for his role as Mack in "Pipe Dream," a 1955 Broadway musical by Rodgers & Hammerstein based on John Steinbeck's "Sweet Thursday." Over the weekend, those old notes, which were written by Steinbeck and described how Wallace should play the role, were on display with a hefty price tag at the Bonhams & Butterfields auction house in West Hollywood.
NEWS
June 21, 1987 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Forget the sun. Forget the North Pole. For one brief summer back in 1967, the world revolved around the intersection of Haight and Ashbury streets in San Francisco, the Hollywood and Vine of Hippiedom. It was the Summer of Love, a time when youth flowed to San Francisco hoping to remake the world with flowers, innocence and LSD. Much has changed since the "turn on, tune in and drop out" counterculture burst into the public consciousness 20 summers ago.
TRAVEL
January 9, 2000 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
The SkyDeck and its 360-degree view of this city from atop the One Embarcadero Center office building is closed, just three years after its grand opening on the 41st floor. Owners Boston Properties last week shut down the SkyDeck, citing its failure to pay off financially, and put the space up for rent. SkyDeck, which also offered computer kiosks on San Francisco history, never really caught on in a city with plenty of places for scenic viewing, ranging from Twin Peaks to Coit Tower.
TRAVEL
May 6, 2001 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mary Ellen Pleasant was either a demon or a saint, a daring 19th century abolitionist who harbored runaway slaves or a blackmailer, voodoo queen and procuress who provided girls for rich men in San Francisco. She was born a slave on a Georgia plantation or a free woman of color in Philadelphia--it's not known definitively which--sometime around 1815.
SPORTS
August 28, 2008 | From the Associated Press
New York 6, at Philadelphia 3: Daniel Murphy hit a tiebreaking double after Carlos Delgado's second solo homer had tied the score in the eighth, and the Mets reclaimed first place in the NL East. at Houston 4, Cincinnati 1: Roy Oswalt limited the Reds to five hits in seven innings and Hunter Pence and Ty Wigginton hit two-run homers to help Oswalt beat the Reds for the 22nd time in 23 decisions. Florida 4, at Atlanta 1: Josh Johnson threw a four-hitter for the first complete game of his career, and Dan Uggla hit his 28th homer for the Marlins.
NEWS
November 12, 1993 | ROY RIVENBURG
When the city dug up its graveyards earlier this century, no one was supposed to stay behind. But a glaring oversight surfaced this summer during renovation and expansion at the Palace of the Legion of Honor. About 300 corpses from the Gold Rush era--two of them still clutching rosaries, others wearing dentures and Levis--were unearthed from what appears to be an old pauper's graveyard. Some experts say another 11,000 bodies might lie underneath the museum grounds.
SPORTS
July 28, 2004 | From Associated Press
If Chicago Cub Manager Dusty Baker really wants to know why Greg Maddux's quest for 300 wins has been so quiet, all he has to do is listen to his selfless right-hander. After beating the Brewers, 7-1, Tuesday night at Milwaukee for his 299th victory, Maddux shied away from the attention that will accompany his attempt to join the exclusive club. "It's not about me. It's about us doing what we can to get into the postseason," Maddux said. "Let's just stay focused on what we have to do as a team.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2005 | Thomas Meaney, Special to The Times
Hollywood legend has it that Alfred Hitchcock's father sent his mischievous son to a London police chief with a note requesting that the boy be locked in a cell for an hour. The disciplinary tactic worked wonders: Hitchcock never disobeyed again, and he went on to make a brilliant career of exploring his grim obsessions, many of which he owed to his brief tenure behind bars.
SPORTS
July 28, 2004 | From Associated Press
If Chicago Cub Manager Dusty Baker really wants to know why Greg Maddux's quest for 300 wins has been so quiet, all he has to do is listen to his selfless right-hander. After beating the Brewers, 7-1, Tuesday night at Milwaukee for his 299th victory, Maddux shied away from the attention that will accompany his attempt to join the exclusive club. "It's not about me. It's about us doing what we can to get into the postseason," Maddux said. "Let's just stay focused on what we have to do as a team.
FOOD
May 14, 2003 | Charles Perry, Times Staff Writer
Years ago, the San Francisco Chronicle explained how to be a California old-timer. In San Francisco, you should say, "I can remember when this was ... a little joint called Luigi's! And you could get veal, pasta, minestrone, spumoni and a bottle of Chianti, all for a buck!" Anybody who's lived in the Bay Area knows how San Franciscans caress the memory of their restaurants.
TRAVEL
May 6, 2001 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mary Ellen Pleasant was either a demon or a saint, a daring 19th century abolitionist who harbored runaway slaves or a blackmailer, voodoo queen and procuress who provided girls for rich men in San Francisco. She was born a slave on a Georgia plantation or a free woman of color in Philadelphia--it's not known definitively which--sometime around 1815.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To its detractors, the sprawling waterfront project brings a soulless Las Vegas-style mimicry to an already-garish Fisherman's Wharf. Critics say the commercial entertainment complex slated for Pier 45 is tailor-made for tourists too hurried to see the real San Francisco. With attractions such as a model Golden Gate Bridge, blankets of fake fog, a faux earthquake and a theme park knock-off of the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood, it would be a schlocky one-stop sightseeing destination, they say.
TRAVEL
January 9, 2000 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
The SkyDeck and its 360-degree view of this city from atop the One Embarcadero Center office building is closed, just three years after its grand opening on the 41st floor. Owners Boston Properties last week shut down the SkyDeck, citing its failure to pay off financially, and put the space up for rent. SkyDeck, which also offered computer kiosks on San Francisco history, never really caught on in a city with plenty of places for scenic viewing, ranging from Twin Peaks to Coit Tower.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1993
A man named Gian Luigi Ferri rounded up three semiautomatic handguns and a satchel containing hundreds of rounds of ammunition and in one unspeakably horrible moment on Thursday transformed the 34th-floor offices of a prestigious San Francisco law firm into a killing zone. By the time Ferri shot himself to death, his merciless and methodical binge of violence had left eight other people dead and six wounded.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The terrible tragedy of the recent San Francisco earthquake recalled a group of history buffs who formed San Francisco 1906, an association of collectors who collect earthquake memorabilia. The name of the group, of course, recounts the 1906 San Francisco temblor, which, at 5:12 a.m. on April 18, 1906, killed about 1,200 people, destroyed about 28,000 buildings and devastated almost 500 city blocks.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The gap is widening. As the networks wallow in such ratings-sweeps trivia as NBC's "Y2K" and CBS' "Aftershock in New York," cable's HBO and Showtime continue producing television's most daring and stimulating movies. Not having to rely on ratings pays off for subscription-driven HBO and Showtime, and also rewards their viewers. Without these two, TV moviedom would be nearly all gruel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1999 | JOYCE GEMPERLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Gemperlein is a freelance writer based in San Francisco
Cows didn't live in San Francisco's Chinatown in 1906, but about five days before the great earthquake that leveled the city, two were seen loping toward the bay. The sky, as the story goes, was brick-red, an omen of the fires that would finish off what the shaking ground hadn't. Mildred Fong's father told her about the cows, the ones somebody outside the ghetto that was Chinatown should have paid attention to.
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