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BUSINESS
August 6, 1989 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
Gerry Liu still winces at the greeting that he received in San Francisco after a trip abroad last winter: At the airport, a U.S. customs agent lectured him about Asian immigrants taking jobs from other Americans. "I said, 'Not true--the company that I founded created more jobs for Americans than it took away,' " the Taiwan native recalled recently. "It wasn't a pleasant conversation." Liu, president of Knights Technology in the San Francisco Bay Area, is not alone.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
Immigrants fighting deportation in San Francisco will no longer be shackled during most court hearings, according to a settlement reached with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The settlement, which received preliminary approval from a federal judge Thursday, is limited to San Francisco Immigration Court but could affect the way immigrants are treated in other jurisdictions. People held at detention centers in the San Francisco area are transported to court shackled at the wrists, waist and ankles, attorneys for four immigrants wrote in a federal lawsuit filed in 2011.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
Immigrants fighting deportation in San Francisco will no longer be shackled during most court hearings, according to a settlement reached with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The settlement, which received preliminary approval from a federal judge Thursday, is limited to San Francisco Immigration Court but could affect how immigrants are treated in other jurisdictions. People held at detention centers in the San Francisco area are transported to court shackled at the wrists, waist and ankles, attorneys for four immigrants wrote in a federal lawsuit filed in 2011.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
Immigrants fighting deportation in San Francisco will no longer be shackled during most court hearings, according to a settlement reached with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The settlement, which received preliminary approval from a federal judge Thursday, is limited to San Francisco Immigration Court but could affect how immigrants are treated in other jurisdictions. People held at detention centers in the San Francisco area are transported to court shackled at the wrists, waist and ankles, attorneys for four immigrants wrote in a federal lawsuit filed in 2011.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
Immigrants fighting deportation in San Francisco will no longer be shackled during most court hearings, according to a settlement reached with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The settlement, which received preliminary approval from a federal judge Thursday, is limited to San Francisco Immigration Court but could affect the way immigrants are treated in other jurisdictions. People held at detention centers in the San Francisco area are transported to court shackled at the wrists, waist and ankles, attorneys for four immigrants wrote in a federal lawsuit filed in 2011.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A San Francisco immigration judge delayed the deportation of two Pakistani brothers who had been ordered to leave the country after voluntarily registering under new national security rules. The yearlong delay paves the way for Hassan Amin, 19, and his brother, Ahmad, 18, to become legal residents. The Department of Homeland Security asked Thursday for the delay, which will give the brothers time to qualify for temporary visas while waiting for approval of their green card applications.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Patrons of a predominantly Latino nightclub in San Francisco sued immigration officials, contending they were harassed and intimidated when agents raided the club in search of illegal aliens. Shortly before midnight on July 22, about 20 agents of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service and the state Alcoholic and Beverage Control Bureau sealed the exits to Club Elegante, searched and handcuffed some of the 150 patrons and demanded identification or proof of citizenship from others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1986 | Times Staff Writer Barry S. Surman compiled the Week in Review stories
An 18-year-old Dutch youth convicted last spring of killing his guardian after suffering years of sexual abuse has been ordered by a San Francisco immigration judge to return to the Netherlands. Immigration Judge James Vandello ruled that Joeri DeBeer was deportable for committing "crimes of moral turpitude" and for being in violation of the terms of his non-immigrant student visa. John R. Alcorn, DeBeer's attorney, said he would appeal the judge's ruling to the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2005 | Rone Tempest, Times Staff Writer
A federal grand jury Thursday indicted a 23-year-old Lodi man on charges that he materially supported terrorism against the United States by attending a training camp in Pakistan in 2003 and 2004. Announced here by U.S. Atty. McGregor W.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | VALARIE BASHEDA, Times Staff Writer
A Chinese national who fled because he feared persecution for violating China's birth-control regulations has been granted political asylum in the United States. Yun Pan Lee, 26, won permission to stay after San Francisco Immigration Judge Bernard Hornbach determined that he would face harsh treatment if he returned to China, where his wife had been discovered in hiding and was forced to abort a pregnancy in the fifth month, Lee's attorney, Jon Wu, said.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1989 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
Gerry Liu still winces at the greeting that he received in San Francisco after a trip abroad last winter: At the airport, a U.S. customs agent lectured him about Asian immigrants taking jobs from other Americans. "I said, 'Not true--the company that I founded created more jobs for Americans than it took away,' " the Taiwan native recalled recently. "It wasn't a pleasant conversation." Liu, president of Knights Technology in the San Francisco Bay Area, is not alone.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2007 | Will Weissert, Associated Press
Washington's trade embargo bars almost all Americans from coming to Cuba -- but it can't keep U.S. films out. Twenty-one full-length U.S. movies and 22 experimental American shorts are being shown as part of Havana's international film festival, which began Tuesday and runs through Dec. 14 at 23 movie theaters and video clubs across the city.
NEWS
July 26, 1992 | From Associated Press
A citizen of Spain who has the AIDS virus challenged the U.S. ban on admitting AIDS-infected non-citizens by arriving at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday. Tomas Fabregas, 34, a legal U.S. resident who lives in Oakland, returned from the International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam on a flight Saturday evening. Fabregas, who was found to have the human immunodeficiency virus in 1987, was greeted by supporters who held a sign reading "AIDS Knows No Borders."
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