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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez
Five airline pilots reported that their planes were struck by lightning as rain fell in the Bay Area, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration said Monday night. The strikes were reported around San Francisco International Airport during a roughly half-hour period that began at 12:15 p.m. Monday, said Ian Gregor, FAA spokesman in Los Angeles. None of the pilots reported damage or requested special assistance, he said. The planes were from Alaska, Horizon, United and United Arab Emirates airlines, the agency said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez
Five airline pilots reported that their planes were struck by lightning as rain fell in the Bay Area, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration said Monday night. The strikes were reported around San Francisco International Airport during a roughly half-hour period that began at 12:15 p.m. Monday, said Ian Gregor, FAA spokesman in Los Angeles. None of the pilots reported damage or requested special assistance, he said. The planes were from Alaska, Horizon, United and United Arab Emirates airlines, the agency said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2013 | By a Times Staff Writer
A Boeing 777 operated by Asiana Airlines crashed while landing at San Francisco International Airport Saturday, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. Video showed black smoke coming from a plane on the tarmac and fire officials were on the scene. It was unclear how many people were on board and whether they were able to escape. The smoke was visible from around the Bay Area. ALSO: Passengers say most seem unhurt; no official word yet Probe of fireworks accident that injured dozens continues Asiana Airlines crash: Passengers taken to hospitals, SFO closed
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A Los Angeles County public defender was so drunk at San Francisco International Airport this week that she resisted arrest, sang the "Happy Days" theme and asked officers for cocaine while in a patrol car, authorities said. Monica Marie Jenkins, 37, was so drunk, according to the San Mateo County district attorney's office, that she refused a suggestion to sober up and catch a later flight, instead demanding she be taken to jail.  As she was being arrested, Jenkins started screaming profanities, threatened to sue the officers and started singing "Rock Around the Clock," prosecutors said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - John Wayne has one. Louis Armstrong has one. Shoot, even Imelda Marcos, shoe queen and former first lady of the Philippines, has one. And John F. Kennedy? He has three airports named in his honor. But here in the vibrant heart of gay America, the push to change the name of San Francisco International Airport to commemorate slain civil rights activist Harvey Milk has run into turbulence. Supervisor David Campos, who floated the idea to make the airport the first in America to be named after an openly gay leader, argues that the moniker Harvey Milk SFO will "make our airport a beacon of hope" around the world "for all individuals who are bullied, discriminated against and abused.
NEWS
April 13, 1992 | Associated Press
About 400 passengers were evacuated from a United Airlines 747 at San Francisco International Airport on Sunday after the pilot reported smoke in the cabin, authorities said. A few people suffered minor injuries while jumping down the plane's emergency chutes, said airport spokesman Ron Wilson. The smoke came from an overheated battery, the Federal Aviation Administration said.
OPINION
March 7, 2013
Re "Idea isn't flying," March 5 The latest proposal to change the name of an airport - this time San Francisco International Airport to the name of slain civil rights activist Harvey Milk - is getting a thumbs-down by the people. No wonder. The idea of naming airports after people has never been a good idea. Airports and their names are vital links in the whole aviation grid, and it should be obvious to indicate where they are geographically located. For instance, why did they change the perfect names of the airports in Burbank and Orange County to the names of two movie actors?
NEWS
January 3, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Several flights at San Francisco International Airport were diverted away from a runway near the long-term parking lot after an unidentified man allegedly fired gunshots in the air, officials said. The man, who may have lived with his family in a motor home on the lot, was taken into custody by airport police, airport spokesman Ron Wilson said. No one was injured and no property was damaged, Wilson said.
NEWS
June 22, 1986
Several passengers suffered minor injuries sliding down emergency escape chutes after an American Airlines Boeing 727 aborted a takeoff at San Francisco International Airport because of smoke coming from the landing gear. The plane, bound for Phoenix with 67 people aboard, was on the runway when the control tower spotted smoke near the left landing gear. The captain pulled the plane over to a taxiway and deployed the emergency chutes. Cause of the smoke is under investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An engine exploded on a Hawaii-bound jetliner shortly after it departed from San Francisco but the plane turned back and landed safely. No one was injured. The United Airlines DC-10 was headed to Kona, Hawaii, with about 240 passengers on board when the engine exploded shortly after takeoff, said Ron Wilson, spokesman for San Francisco International Airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Kate Mather, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
Asiana Airlines has been fined $500,000 for failing to assist passengers and their families following last year's crash in San Francisco, federal transportation officials announced Tuesday, noting that it took up to five days for the airline to contact family members of those onboard and to provide other services required by federal law. In a statement, the U.S. Department of Transportation said the Korean airline did not "adhere to the assurances in...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Laura J. Nelson
Citing the high cost and risk of tunneling under Los Angeles International Airport, county transportation officials said Wednesday that it did not make sense to build a light-rail line directly under the airport's terminal area. Their recommendation to discard four possible LAX alternatives, although preliminary, could permanently change a decades-long discussion on how to connect light rail to the nation's third-busiest airport. Three of the alternatives would require tunneling under terminals and runways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By Dan Weikel and Rich Simon
WASHINGTON -- The captain flying the Asiana Airlines flight that crashed in San Francisco in July told accident investigators the approach for landing was "very stressful" and he thought the plane's automatic throttle was always working, according to a federal report released Wednesday. Lee Kang Kuk, 46, who was landing at San Francisco International Airport for the first time, told National Transportation Safety Board officials in an interview the visual approach was difficult to perform in the large Boeing 777 because the runway's light system that helps guide pilots was out of service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By Dan Weikel and Rich Simon
WASHINGTON - The trainee captain flying the Asiana Airlines flight that slowed dangerously and crashed in San Francisco in July told investigators the approach to the landing was "very stressful" and he mistakenly thought an automatic throttle was controlling the plane's air speed. Lee Kang Kuk, 46, who was landing a Boeing 777 at San Francisco International Airport for the first time, also told National Transportation Safety Board officials that manually bringing the airliner down onto the runway was difficult because an airport guidance system for pilots was out of service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
An investigative hearing exploring the deadly Asiana Airlines crash in San Francisco earlier this year has been postponed again, this time because of wintry weather in Washington, D.C. The National Transporation Safety Board had already postponed the hearing from November to December because of the partial government shutdown. The hearing, rescheduled for Tuesday, has now been postponed a second time, with the NTSB citing inclement weather in the area as the reason. A winter storm blanketed the D.C. region Tuesday with a layer of several inches of snow, prompting schools and many federal government offices to close for the day. [Updated 11:43 a.m. PST, Dec. 10, 2013: The NTSB announced that the hearing has been resecheduled for Wednesday from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. ]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Because of the government shutdown earlier this month, the National Transportation Safety Board said this week that they are delaying from November to December a two-day investigative hearing about the deadly Asiana Airlines plane crash in San Francisco earlier this year. Asiana Airlines Flight 214 on July 6 clipped a seawall and slammed into a runway while landing at San Francisco International Airport. Three teenage girls were killed in the crash and more than 180 other people were injured.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
San Francisco International Airport's domestic terminals will be referred to by number instead of compass points beginning Monday. Passengers who aren't familiar with the airport are sometimes perplexed by the north, south and central terminal designations--especially if they don't speak English. So the south terminal will be renamed Terminal 1, central will become Terminal 2 and the north terminal will be Terminal 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2013 | By Kate Mather
No criminal charges will be filed against the first responders to the Asiana Airlines crash in San Francisco in July, including the firefighter who drove a rig that struck and killed a 16-year-old girl, prosecutors said Friday. San Mateo County Dist. Atty. Stephen M. Wagstaffe said that after reviewing "numerous videos" and reports from coroner's officials, police officers, firefighters and other first responders, his office determined there was "no criminal culpability for any individual involved in the response to the airline crash.
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