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San Francisco Jazz Festival

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2001
SFJazz has announced the lineup for its 19th annual San Francisco Jazz Festival, the West Coast's most comprehensive collection of jazz events. The program runs from Oct. 24 through Nov. 4 at various locations. Among the major artists: Kenny Barron and Regina Carter (Oct. 25), Etta James (Oct. 26), Rosemary Clooney (Oct. 27), Don Byron (Oct. 27 and 28), Bobby Short and his Orchestra (Oct. 28), Bill Frisell (Oct. 29), Charlie Haden's Nocturne (with Gonzalo Rubalcaba and Joe Lovano) (Oct.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2012 | By Chris Barton
Los Angeles-area jazz fans looking for a reason to escape our hottest months will have ample reasons to trek north on the Golden State Freeway beginning in August with the recently announced lineup of the 30th annual San Francisco Jazz Festival. Less of a traditional festival than it is the fall to winter programming season for SFJAZZ, the city's year-round jazz presenting organization, the festival is the last before the much-anticipated opening of the multi-million dollar SFJAZZ Center, which is scheduled to open onMartin Luther King Jr.Dayin 2013.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Diversity may be the best single definition of the San Francisco Jazz Festival. Like the city that is its host, the nearly two-week-long event hews to the premise that it can embrace every imaginable style, manner and attitude. The first week's programming, for example, opened with a performance by two veteran jazz vocal artists, Abbey Lincoln and Jimmy Smith, moved on to a film tribute to Louis Armstrong and a program featuring the Jazz Mandolin Project and Bay Area guitarist Will Bernard.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Putting together a jazz festival is not an easy task. And it's become even more difficult during an era in which the music is not exactly blessed with iconic figures. Forty or 50 years ago, the task was far different, at a time when it was possible to put together a lineup from a pool of talent ranging from Charlie Parker, Duke Ellington and Thelonious Monk to Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie and Miles Davis.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sunday's virtually nonstop program at the San Francisco Jazz Festival was a classic example of the production's insistence upon integrating the event into the diverse energies of this colorful city. The day started with a stunning blend of music and place. The music was the brisk, Django Reinhardt-inspired violin-and-guitar jazz of the Hot Club of San Francisco, and the hard-swinging, Count Basie-style rhythms of singer Lavay Smith and her Red Hot Skillet Lickers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What does it take to make a great jazz festival? A strong sense of place and the right programming to fill it, according to Randall Klein, who has built the San Francisco Jazz Festival into one of the most impressive events of its kind in North America. The 16th installment of the festival opens Thursday and runs for the following 11 days in locations around San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The weather was perfect, with plenty of crisp, sunny days and clear, moonlit nights. The music was filled with diversity and excitement. The crowds were enthusiastic. It was, in short, the opening days of the San Francisco Jazz Festival. And, once again, the week-and-a-half-long event certified its reputation as one of the country's most entertaining music events. There was plenty of high-profile talent. Singer Al Jarreau opened the festival on Thursday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's Sunday afternoon, and the wail of a saxophone drifts through thesounds of Market Street traffic. In Union Square, rhythmic percussion patterns cut across the rumble of the cable cars and the conversational buzz of the pedestrians. As it turns out, it isn't exactly a saxophone, but the sound of an enterprising street musician performing, amazingly, on an electronic wind instrument accompanied by his own preset rhythm loops.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The prospects for jazz on the West Coast are looking good for the new millennium. Jazz in the City, the producer of the San Francisco Jazz Festival, has made several announcements this week regarding developments that will have a significant impact upon jazz on the West Coast in general, and on the Bay Area in particular. There is, first of all, a new name for the company: San Francisco Jazz Organization (SFJAZZ), chosen to reflect the new, year-round approach to jazz programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Putting together a jazz festival is not an easy task. And it's become even more difficult during an era in which the music is not exactly blessed with iconic figures. Forty or 50 years ago, the task was far different, at a time when it was possible to put together a lineup from a pool of talent ranging from Charlie Parker, Duke Ellington and Thelonious Monk to Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie and Miles Davis.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The San Francisco Jazz Festival kicked off its 19th season Wednesday night at the Masonic Auditorium with "A Love Supreme: John Coltrane 75th Anniversary Celebration." With Tommy Flanagan, McCoy Tyner and Pharoah Sanders as the headliners, the program encompassed three phases in the career of the tenor saxophone jazz icon.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2001
SFJazz has announced the lineup for its 19th annual San Francisco Jazz Festival, the West Coast's most comprehensive collection of jazz events. The program runs from Oct. 24 through Nov. 4 at various locations. Among the major artists: Kenny Barron and Regina Carter (Oct. 25), Etta James (Oct. 26), Rosemary Clooney (Oct. 27), Don Byron (Oct. 27 and 28), Bobby Short and his Orchestra (Oct. 28), Bill Frisell (Oct. 29), Charlie Haden's Nocturne (with Gonzalo Rubalcaba and Joe Lovano) (Oct.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's Sunday afternoon, and the wail of a saxophone drifts through thesounds of Market Street traffic. In Union Square, rhythmic percussion patterns cut across the rumble of the cable cars and the conversational buzz of the pedestrians. As it turns out, it isn't exactly a saxophone, but the sound of an enterprising street musician performing, amazingly, on an electronic wind instrument accompanied by his own preset rhythm loops.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Diversity may be the best single definition of the San Francisco Jazz Festival. Like the city that is its host, the nearly two-week-long event hews to the premise that it can embrace every imaginable style, manner and attitude. The first week's programming, for example, opened with a performance by two veteran jazz vocal artists, Abbey Lincoln and Jimmy Smith, moved on to a film tribute to Louis Armstrong and a program featuring the Jazz Mandolin Project and Bay Area guitarist Will Bernard.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The prospects for jazz on the West Coast are looking good for the new millennium. Jazz in the City, the producer of the San Francisco Jazz Festival, has made several announcements this week regarding developments that will have a significant impact upon jazz on the West Coast in general, and on the Bay Area in particular. There is, first of all, a new name for the company: San Francisco Jazz Organization (SFJAZZ), chosen to reflect the new, year-round approach to jazz programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sunday's virtually nonstop program at the San Francisco Jazz Festival was a classic example of the production's insistence upon integrating the event into the diverse energies of this colorful city. The day started with a stunning blend of music and place. The music was the brisk, Django Reinhardt-inspired violin-and-guitar jazz of the Hot Club of San Francisco, and the hard-swinging, Count Basie-style rhythms of singer Lavay Smith and her Red Hot Skillet Lickers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2012 | By Chris Barton
Los Angeles-area jazz fans looking for a reason to escape our hottest months will have ample reasons to trek north on the Golden State Freeway beginning in August with the recently announced lineup of the 30th annual San Francisco Jazz Festival. Less of a traditional festival than it is the fall to winter programming season for SFJAZZ, the city's year-round jazz presenting organization, the festival is the last before the much-anticipated opening of the multi-million dollar SFJAZZ Center, which is scheduled to open onMartin Luther King Jr.Dayin 2013.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The San Francisco Jazz Festival kicked off its 19th season Wednesday night at the Masonic Auditorium with "A Love Supreme: John Coltrane 75th Anniversary Celebration." With Tommy Flanagan, McCoy Tyner and Pharoah Sanders as the headliners, the program encompassed three phases in the career of the tenor saxophone jazz icon.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The weather was perfect, with plenty of crisp, sunny days and clear, moonlit nights. The music was filled with diversity and excitement. The crowds were enthusiastic. It was, in short, the opening days of the San Francisco Jazz Festival. And, once again, the week-and-a-half-long event certified its reputation as one of the country's most entertaining music events. There was plenty of high-profile talent. Singer Al Jarreau opened the festival on Thursday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What does it take to make a great jazz festival? A strong sense of place and the right programming to fill it, according to Randall Klein, who has built the San Francisco Jazz Festival into one of the most impressive events of its kind in North America. The 16th installment of the festival opens Thursday and runs for the following 11 days in locations around San Francisco.
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