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NEWS
August 23, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Condor nightclub--made famous by topless dancer Carol Doda and infamous by a killer piano--is about to be stripped of its longtime beacon, a 40-foot likeness of the buxom dancer, complete with blinking nipples. The club's new owner plans to display the sign indoors when the newly overhauled Condor reopens as a combination cafe and dance spot. In its place will be a deco-style neon sign reading simply Condor Bistro.
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NEWS
December 1, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The Mark Hopkins hotel at the top of Nob Hill in San Francisco opened its doors on Dec. 4, 1926. The landmark hotel, now part of the Intercontinental chain, sits at the location of what was once the mansion of California railroad magnate Mark Hopkins. Hopkins never lived to see the home completed, and it later burned down in a fire caused by the 1906 earthquake. Now the hotel turns 85 in style with a few celebratory deals at its 19th-floor Top of the Mark lounge.
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NEWS
January 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
A fire nearly destroyed one of the city's oldest churches early Sunday. St. Peter's Catholic Church, dedicated in 1885, was one of the few churches to survive the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. The Mission District church's roof was destroyed in the three-hour blaze. Engineers will be brought in to determine whether the building can be saved. Investigators said preliminary findings indicate the fire was accidental, ignited either by candles or by an electrical malfunction.
NEWS
June 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
The birthplace of the counterculture Beat movement may soon be recognized by the very establishment that its devotees railed against. The Landmarks Preservation Advisory Board voted unanimously Wednesday to recommend landmark status for City Lights Bookstore, the quirky building where Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac and a 1950s literary bunch known as beatniks drank coffee and questioned authority.
NEWS
December 31, 1987 | DANA NICHOLS, Times Staff Writer
The Condor Club, birthplace of topless entertainment, will expose its last bare bosom tonight. The last topless show will be followed immediately on New Year's Eve by a new show featuring satin gowns, bustles and push up corsets.
NEWS
November 26, 1999 | SAM BRUCHEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After 63 years of high heels, padded bras and bawdy humor, the curtain is about to fall on this city's legendary drag club Finoccio's. But inside the club, it still feels like vaudeville is alive and well. On a recent Saturday night, cast members buzzed with excitement. They dabbed their cheeks with rouge and tugged their wigs down tight before racing to the tiny stage just as the lights went on. If this really was the end, the boys wanted to go out with a bang.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | United Press International
A $1-million fire erupted in a turn-of-the-century building in the Castro District early Friday, causing heavy damage to a half dozen small businesses including a landmark gay bar. The four-alarm blaze was battled for more than two hours by 100 firefighters before it was brought under control. The fire, which caused heavy damage to the Elephant Walk bar at 18th and Castro streets, apparently started in a gift shop in the two story building and spread to surrounding businesses, firefighters
NEWS
November 13, 1988
A 1901 shipwreck at the bottom of the Golden Gate has been added to the National Register of Historic Sites, protecting it from harm through any federal action. The steamer City of Rio de Janeiro crashed into submerged rocks in the fog Feb. 22, 1901, killing 121 passengers and crew in the worst maritime disaster in San Francisco's history. An East Bay group called Seagamb is seeking permission from the California Lands Commission to conduct a salvage operation.
TRAVEL
September 13, 1998 | SHARON BOORSTIN, Boorstin is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer
The temperature was hovering in the 90s on a recent Friday evening when my husband, Paul, and I flew out of Burbank airport. As an aficionado of history and architecture, I'd signed us up for the "Victorian Home Walk," a $20-per-person, 2 1/2-hour walking tour of some of San Francisco's 14,000 Victorian houses.
NEWS
November 26, 1999 | SAM BRUCHEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After 63 years of high heels, padded bras and bawdy humor, the curtain is about to fall on this city's legendary drag club Finoccio's. But inside the club, it still feels like vaudeville is alive and well. On a recent Saturday night, cast members buzzed with excitement. They dabbed their cheeks with rouge and tugged their wigs down tight before racing to the tiny stage just as the lights went on. If this really was the end, the boys wanted to go out with a bang.
TRAVEL
September 13, 1998 | SHARON BOORSTIN, Boorstin is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer
The temperature was hovering in the 90s on a recent Friday evening when my husband, Paul, and I flew out of Burbank airport. As an aficionado of history and architecture, I'd signed us up for the "Victorian Home Walk," a $20-per-person, 2 1/2-hour walking tour of some of San Francisco's 14,000 Victorian houses.
NEWS
January 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
A fire nearly destroyed one of the city's oldest churches early Sunday. St. Peter's Catholic Church, dedicated in 1885, was one of the few churches to survive the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. The Mission District church's roof was destroyed in the three-hour blaze. Engineers will be brought in to determine whether the building can be saved. Investigators said preliminary findings indicate the fire was accidental, ignited either by candles or by an electrical malfunction.
NEWS
January 22, 1996 | DAVID L. ULIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City Lights Bookstore occupies a narrow triangle of space in North Beach, wedged between Broadway and Jack Kerouac Alley, across Columbus Avenue from the original site of A.P. Giannini's Bank of Italy. In a very real sense, it stands at the crossroads of this city--just a few hundred feet east of Chinatown's Grant Avenue and catty-corner to the Condor Club, where in 1969 Carol Doda became the first bottomless dancer in the United States.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Albert C. Walker is an avid hiker but he carefully avoids the eucalyptus-lined trails of nearby Mt. Davidson Park. And while he can admire the view of the park from his dining room, he prefers to sit with his back to the window. The reason: a 103-foot concrete-and-steel cross that towers over the city-owned, 31-acre park atop the highest peak in San Francisco, visible for miles and believed to be the largest of its kind in the nation.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Condor nightclub--made famous by topless dancer Carol Doda and infamous by a killer piano--is about to be stripped of its longtime beacon, a 40-foot likeness of the buxom dancer, complete with blinking nipples. The club's new owner plans to display the sign indoors when the newly overhauled Condor reopens as a combination cafe and dance spot. In its place will be a deco-style neon sign reading simply Condor Bistro.
NEWS
January 9, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN and AMY STEVENS, Times Staff Writers
Twice a day every day for as long as anyone here remembers, the sharp reports of cannon fire have echoed through the affluent San Francisco neighborhoods overlooking the spectacular Golden Gate. As familiar as the area's plaintive foghorns, the ceremonial cannon signals reveille and retreat--the hoisting and lowering of the flag--at the Presidio of San Francisco, America's oldest continually active military base. Soon, however, federal budget cutters may silence the cannon by closing the base.
TRAVEL
August 18, 1991 | BARBARA MALONE, Malone is an Encino free-lance writer. and
Robert Louis Stevenson called it "one of the most San Francisco-y parts of San Francisco." Sam Spade took his secretary to lunch there. And in the 1947 film "Dark Passage," Humphrey Bogart struggled up its steep steps in search of Lauren Bacall. This is San Francisco's Telegraph Hill, a place where--as described in the walk below--at one moment you're on top of the world, while in the next you're descending into a 19th-Century neighborhood of lush plantings and historic houses.
NEWS
October 25, 1989 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a wrecking ball punched into the historic Cominos Hotel again and again last Friday, Betty Brusa sadly clicked away with her camera, recording for posterity the death of one of the Salinas Valley's most regal landmarks. "It was heartbreaking," said Brusa, president of the Monterey County Historical Society, who with a stunned group of local preservationists and history buffs watched the destruction of the old luxury hotel in downtown Salinas--a favorite haunt of author John Steinbeck.
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