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NEWS
December 12, 1987 | United Press International
The exclusive all-male Bohemian Club lost a last-ditch effort Friday in Superior Court to strike down a city ordinance aimed at forcing the 115-year-old club to admit women. In a hearing closed to reporters, Judge Daniel Hanlon denied the club's request for a temporary restraining order, ruling that it would be an inappropriate intrusion into the separation of powers between the judiciary and legislative branches of government.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2005 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
This city and county Tuesday became the first in California to pass a law regulating pit bulls, in the wake of a state law change last month that allows municipalities to enact limited measures regulating specific breeds. Mayor Gavin Newsom sought the change in state law after the mauling death in June of a 12-year-old San Francisco boy left alone with two family pit bulls.
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NEWS
December 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Declaring it the worker safety issue of the 1990s, Mayor Art Agnos signed into law the nation's toughest legislation regulating video display terminals. Union leaders promised they now will turn the battle for regulation of computers in the workplace to the state and federal arenas.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2005 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Dealing another setback to the property rights movement, the Supreme Court on Monday upheld a San Francisco ordinance that required building owners to pay the city a fee when they converted rental units into hotel rooms. The owners of the San Remo Hotel said the $567,000 fee they were forced to pay violated the Constitution's guarantee that "private property [shall not] be taken for public use without just compensation." Three years ago, the California Supreme Court upheld the ordinance.
NEWS
December 11, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the business community's strenuous objections, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors on Monday gave preliminary approval to a groundbreaking law that sets safety rules for the use of video display terminals in the workplace. If the measure passes a second vote, scheduled for next Monday, and is signed into law by Mayor Art Agnos, San Francisco will become the first city in the nation to have VDT regulations. Late last year, a similar law in Suffolk County, N.Y.
NEWS
January 27, 1999 | From Associated Press
Zapping a laser pointer at a passing car may seem enticingly close to something out of "Star Wars," but it's a menace for motorists, city officials say. The City Council unanimously passed an ordinance Tuesday night that makes it illegal to point the device at motorists and limits minors' access to them in the east San Francisco Bay Area community. It was not immediately clear how sales of the gadgets would be regulated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Santa Monica and San Francisco violated federal law by trying to block banks from charging fees to people who use automated teller machines but don't hold accounts with those institutions, a federal judge ruled in a decision released Monday. However, officials for both cities said the dispute is not over and that they soon will appeal to the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. "This ruling isn't a defeat. It's a step forward," Santa Monica City Councilman Kevin McKeown said Monday.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH and PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Since the 1930s, engineers have believed that certain homes, apartment houses and office buildings in San Francisco would be extraordinarily vulnerable to a major earthquake. The aging, unreinforced brick buildings would have almost no chance of surviving the severe side-to-side shaking that an earthquake would bring. Or so the experts predicted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1990
The Los Angeles City Council unanimously agreed Tuesday to hire a San Francisco law firm to handle the city's suit aimed at halting the aerial spraying of the pesticide malathion in the battle against the Mediterranean fruit fly. Councilman Joel Wachs, who proposed the suit, said the firm of Heller, Erhman, White & McAuliffe has experts in environmental law. The council did not place a dollar limit on the contract.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1991 | From Associated Press
The state Court of Appeal has ruled that law firms must notify clients before raising agreed-upon rates, a move that may make lawyers more careful in discussing fees. The three-justice panel on Tuesday rejected a claim by Severson, Werson, Berke & Melchoir against Kenneth Bolinger, whom the San Francisco firm sued after he refused to pay raised rates he wasn't notified about. The firm argued that an agreement to charge "regular hourly rates" meant that it could raise rates without warning.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | From Reuters
A prestigious ballet school has been accused of violating San Francisco's new law against size discrimination for rejecting a young ballerina allegedly deemed too large. In a complaint lodged with the city's Human Rights Commission, 8-year-old Fredrika Keefer and her mother, Krissy Keefer, say the San Francisco Ballet School dashed Fredrika's dreams because she did not fit criteria requiring applicants to have "a well-proportioned, slender body."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Santa Monica and San Francisco violated federal law by trying to block banks from charging fees to people who use automated teller machines but don't hold accounts with those institutions, a federal judge ruled in a decision released Monday. However, officials for both cities said the dispute is not over and that they soon will appeal to the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. "This ruling isn't a defeat. It's a step forward," Santa Monica City Councilman Kevin McKeown said Monday.
NEWS
January 27, 1999 | From Associated Press
Zapping a laser pointer at a passing car may seem enticingly close to something out of "Star Wars," but it's a menace for motorists, city officials say. The City Council unanimously passed an ordinance Tuesday night that makes it illegal to point the device at motorists and limits minors' access to them in the east San Francisco Bay Area community. It was not immediately clear how sales of the gadgets would be regulated.
NEWS
May 18, 1996 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republicans on the Senate Whitewater Committee charged Friday that there were flaws and limits in an official report the White House has claimed clears President and Mrs. Clinton of wrongdoing in the Whitewater case. The focus of the committee's attention was a report prepared for the Resolution Trust Corp. at a cost of nearly $4 million by a San Francisco-based law firm that spent two years examining Madison Guaranty Savings & Loan, the failed Little Rock, Ark.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1991 | From Associated Press
The state Court of Appeal has ruled that law firms must notify clients before raising agreed-upon rates, a move that may make lawyers more careful in discussing fees. The three-justice panel on Tuesday rejected a claim by Severson, Werson, Berke & Melchoir against Kenneth Bolinger, whom the San Francisco firm sued after he refused to pay raised rates he wasn't notified about. The firm argued that an agreement to charge "regular hourly rates" meant that it could raise rates without warning.
NEWS
December 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Declaring it the worker safety issue of the 1990s, Mayor Art Agnos signed into law the nation's toughest legislation regulating video display terminals. Union leaders promised they now will turn the battle for regulation of computers in the workplace to the state and federal arenas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2005 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
This city and county Tuesday became the first in California to pass a law regulating pit bulls, in the wake of a state law change last month that allows municipalities to enact limited measures regulating specific breeds. Mayor Gavin Newsom sought the change in state law after the mauling death in June of a 12-year-old San Francisco boy left alone with two family pit bulls.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2005 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Dealing another setback to the property rights movement, the Supreme Court on Monday upheld a San Francisco ordinance that required building owners to pay the city a fee when they converted rental units into hotel rooms. The owners of the San Remo Hotel said the $567,000 fee they were forced to pay violated the Constitution's guarantee that "private property [shall not] be taken for public use without just compensation." Three years ago, the California Supreme Court upheld the ordinance.
NEWS
December 11, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the business community's strenuous objections, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors on Monday gave preliminary approval to a groundbreaking law that sets safety rules for the use of video display terminals in the workplace. If the measure passes a second vote, scheduled for next Monday, and is signed into law by Mayor Art Agnos, San Francisco will become the first city in the nation to have VDT regulations. Late last year, a similar law in Suffolk County, N.Y.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
Public hearings began here Tuesday on an ordinance that would be the only local measure in the nation setting protective standards for workers who use video display terminals in private businesses. The proposed ordinance, drafted by a coalition of union officials, public health advocates and politicians, comes after a 15-month period in which virtually every effort to regulate VDTs at the local, state and national levels has failed.
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