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NEWS
September 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Turning the Presidio into a national park will eliminate 1,800 jobs but not problems posed by toxic wastes on the 1,270-acre outpost, the Army said in a draft environmental impact statement. The Army also warned that San Francisco faces a rancorous debate over what to do with a 36-acre Public Health Service hospital site that is being considered for several uses, from a AIDS-care facility to apartments, offices or a college.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2007 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
Doris and Donald Fisher, founders of the Gap, have made an offer to fund the design and construction of a contemporary art museum that would be located in the heart of San Francisco's Presidio and would house their extensive collection of 20th and 21st century art.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2007 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
Doris and Donald Fisher, founders of the Gap, have made an offer to fund the design and construction of a contemporary art museum that would be located in the heart of San Francisco's Presidio and would house their extensive collection of 20th and 21st century art.
NEWS
October 26, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, Crissy Field served as the industrial back door for the U.S. Army at San Francisco's historic Presidio military base. Strewn with rubble, paved with more than 40 acres of asphalt and scarred by an elevated freeway separating it from the rest of the Presidio, the field graphically underscored the post's 200-year military history. By trashing the site, the Army turned its back on the breathtaking mile-and-a-half panorama of San Francisco Bay visible from its shores.
NEWS
October 26, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, Crissy Field served as the industrial back door for the U.S. Army at San Francisco's historic Presidio military base. Strewn with rubble, paved with more than 40 acres of asphalt and scarred by an elevated freeway separating it from the rest of the Presidio, the field graphically underscored the post's 200-year military history. By trashing the site, the Army turned its back on the breathtaking mile-and-a-half panorama of San Francisco Bay visible from its shores.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Turning the Presidio into a national park will eliminate 1,800 jobs but not problems posed by toxic wastes on the 1,270-acre outpost, the Army said in a draft environmental impact statement. The Army also warned that San Francisco faces a rancorous debate over what to do with a 36-acre Public Health Service hospital site that is being considered for several uses, from a AIDS-care facility to apartments, offices or a college.
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