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December 16, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Rip is a little out of it. One sunny day during the summer of '68--just before taking off for the Democratic National Convention in Chicago--he had a bad acid trip, curled up in a spot in Golden Gate Park and fell asleep. Now he's waking up . . . in 1988.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2011 | By Maria L. La Ganga, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Francisco -- Ebenezer Scrooge is a corporate banker, busy foreclosing on the hapless masses. Bob Cratchit and his beleaguered family live in a chilly tent in an anonymous Occupy encampment. The ghost of Christmas future sports a flowing black robe of taped-together trash bags and plastic sheeting. Tiny Tim dies. At least that's how the San Francisco Mime Troupe's resident playwright, Michael Gene Sullivan, has re-imagined "A Christmas Carol" for the troubled 21st century.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1987 | RAY LOYND
The San Francisco Mime Troupe, a Tony-laureled theater collective that long ago gave up mime in favor of highly vocal political comedy, is showing some of the wear of its 28-year history. The 13-member touring troupe blew into Caltech's Beckman Auditorium last weekend for a single performance of its South African-inspired spy/thriller, "The Mozamgola Caper." The production is exuberant, richly musical and flavorfully visual.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2011 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
When thousands of American youths dropped out of mainstream society and descended on San Francisco in the mid-1960s convulsion known as the counterculture, Peter Berg and a small band of like-minded subversives were there to greet them. Calling themselves the Diggers, they dished out free food in Golden Gate Park, opened a free store in Haight-Ashbury and staged free street performances — guerrilla theater, as Berg named the impromptu events. Through such provocative actions the Diggers sought to create a sense of community in the middle of a cultural maelstrom.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1994 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"Escape From Cyberia . . . A Virtual Odyssey," the big-hearted, cheerfully amateurish and generally endearing musical comic book on racism from the San Francisco Mime Troupe, arrived at Los Angeles Theatre Center on Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
In 1954, John Wayne made the movie that may have killed him. Like 91 of the 220 people who worked on "The Conqueror," Wayne developed cancer. Later, 46 of them died from it. The movie set was in St. George, Utah, near an atomic testing range where 11 bombs were detonated the year before. Coincidence? Not according to the San Francisco Mime Troupe, which points a finger at these developments in "Secrets in the Sand." The show played in San Diego Wednesday and then moved to Culver City, where its second and final performance is tonight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2011 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
When thousands of American youths dropped out of mainstream society and descended on San Francisco in the mid-1960s convulsion known as the counterculture, Peter Berg and a small band of like-minded subversives were there to greet them. Calling themselves the Diggers, they dished out free food in Golden Gate Park, opened a free store in Haight-Ashbury and staged free street performances — guerrilla theater, as Berg named the impromptu events. Through such provocative actions the Diggers sought to create a sense of community in the middle of a cultural maelstrom.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
In 1954, John Wayne made the movie that may have killed him. It didn't hurt him professionally, although "The Conqueror," afilm about Genghis Khan's passion for a Tartar princess, may go down as the Duke's worst. But like 91 of the 220 cast and crew members who worked on the film, Wayne developed cancer. And like 46 of those, including Susan Hayward, Agnes Moorehead and director William Powell, he died from it. Coincidence? Not according to the San Francisco Mime Troupe, which points a finger at these statistics and the shadowy figures behind them in "Secrets in the Sand."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1998 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1968, during the depths of the Vietnam War, the San Francisco Mime Troupe was banned from Cal State Fullerton because administrators feared the agitprop group would incite antiwar violence, according to one retired professor. "These were very troubling times on college campuses," where protesters railed against the war, James D. Young, who ran the school's theater department, said this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
In this corner, the Moral Majority and the War Machine. In that corner, Factwino and one valiant branch librarian. That's the lineup in the San Francisco Mime Troupe's "FACTWINO: The Opera" at the Variety Arts Theatre, and there is no doubt which way the boo's and the yay's are supposed to fall. But, as when watching Handsome Harry take on Murk the Turk on late-night wrestling, there is this tendency to root for the bad guy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2006 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
The imperiled separation of church and state drives "Godfellas," which plays the Actors' Gang through Sunday. Although no actual pies enter the fray, more than one sacred cow drips with figurative meringue before this subversive bust-up by the San Francisco Mime Troupe reaches its rousing conclusion. Since 1959, the Mime Troupe has served up renegade fare with a socially relevant bent, and "Godfellas" is as bent as it gets.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any street-corner agitator can spout the old saw about the personal being political. Joan Holden's mission of the moment is to fuse them vividly on stage. Since January, the veteran playwright has struggled to transform Barbara Ehrenreich's "Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America," a political broadside that has been a nonfiction bestseller, into a dramatic personal tale. It opens Thursday at the Mark Taper Forum.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Artists and musicians inhabit loft space. Neighborhood becomes trendy. Developers drum artists out via rent hikes, so trendoids with dough can move into fabulous renovated live/work lofts no longer dominated by pesky artists. All this, and a $3.90 latte right down the block! Such is the gentrification situation tackled by "City for Sale," the latest from the nation's best-known activist theater collective, the San Francisco Mime Troupe.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1998 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1968, during the depths of the Vietnam War, the San Francisco Mime Troupe was banned from Cal State Fullerton because administrators feared the agitprop group would incite antiwar violence, according to one retired professor. "These were very troubling times on college campuses," where protesters railed against the war, James D. Young, who ran the school's theater department, said this week.
NEWS
June 4, 1998 | LOUISE STEINMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Where were you in the summer of 1967? If, like actor Peter Coyote, you were on the liberated turf of San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury, you could "sing, beg, get high, cruise for sex, plot the overthrow of the government, be mad, or do what you chose." In his new memoir, "Sleeping Where I Fall" (Counterpoint), Coyote describes that global moment when "a feeling of potential charged the air like pollen . . . and ideas seemed nourishing enough to sustain life."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1994 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"Escape From Cyberia . . . A Virtual Odyssey," the big-hearted, cheerfully amateurish and generally endearing musical comic book on racism from the San Francisco Mime Troupe, arrived at Los Angeles Theatre Center on Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
The San Francisco Mime Troupe believes that you can make people think by making them laugh. The Los Angeles Theatre Center believes in speaking out for the excluded. It was time they did a show together. But they could have found something less pious than "Spain '36." Written by the Mime Troupe's Joan Holden, it is a pageant with songs about the brave workers who fought for Spain in '36 against the unholy alliance of church, army and money that was the Fascist cause.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1987 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Two hours of slapstick comedy, juggling, acrobatics, trapeze action, hot jazz and audience participation, all wrapped up in a fast-paced, funny play for kids can only mean one thing: The Make-A-Circus troupe of San Francisco is back in town for another summer tour of Southland parks. What a treat. And what a bargain: Aside from its opening evening performance at Anaheim's Pearson Park Theatre last Thursday, it's free, folks. This year's show--the troupe's best yet--has a Middle Eastern setting.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1992 | JOHN BOUDREAU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's another Sunday in Frances Willard Park, better known as Ho Chi Minh Park, site of violent Vietnam-era protests. The San Francisco Mime Troupe, world-renowned vagabond thespians who pack their stage, set and sound system in a truck, assembles to perform as riot police casually prepare for a nearby demonstration. Suddenly, a group of naked men and women, slathered in mud and grunting like gorillas, runs by.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
In 1954, John Wayne made the movie that may have killed him. Like 91 of the 220 people who worked on "The Conqueror," Wayne developed cancer. Later, 46 of them died from it. The movie set was in St. George, Utah, near an atomic testing range where 11 bombs were detonated the year before. Coincidence? Not according to the San Francisco Mime Troupe, which points a finger at these developments in "Secrets in the Sand." The show played in San Diego Wednesday and then moved to Culver City, where its second and final performance is tonight.
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