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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Last year, a couple walking the usual route around their California Gold Country property happened upon a can sticking out of the ground. They pulled it out and uncovered seven others, all filled with hundreds of U.S. gold coins. Experts announced the find last month after a year of work researching and authenticating the 1,427 coins, worth an estimated $10 million. But the origin of the Saddle Ridge hoard remains a tantalizing mystery, one that has coin buffs and amateur sleuths on the case.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Last year, a couple walking the usual route around their California Gold Country property happened upon a can sticking out of the ground. They pulled it out and uncovered seven others, all filled with hundreds of U.S. gold coins. Experts announced the find last month after a year of work researching and authenticating the 1,427 coins, worth an estimated $10 million. But the origin of the Saddle Ridge hoard remains a tantalizing mystery, one that has coin buffs and amateur sleuths on the case.
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BUSINESS
October 30, 1986
James A. Baker III, secretary of the Treasury, struck the first U.S. bullion silver dollar in history. It was the first of 1 million, 1-ounce American Eagle silver dollars to be struck at the San Francisco Mint by Nov. 24, when they will be distributed first to 27 bulk dealers nationwide, then to retail outlets for public sale. Hundreds of guests looked on as Baker struck the silver blank twice, as is done with special coins to sharpen the impressions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
The news of a Northern California couple's discovery of more than 1,400 gold coins hidden on their property has experts, history buffs and regular folks speculating on the treasure's origin. Though officials said it is unlikely the coins were stolen in a turn-of-the-century theft at the U.S. Mint in San Francisco, some wonder if the cache could be one of many believed buried by the  Knights of the Golden Circle . The secretive, subversive Confederate group is thought to have hidden millions in ill-gotten gold across a dozen states to finance a second Civil War. PHOTOS: California couple discovers cache of gold coins The coins very well could be a fortune buried by a wealthy businessman, but the time period, markers near the cache and manner in which the coins were buried fit the mold of the KGC, said Warren Getler, a former Wall Street Journal reporter who coauthored “Rebel Gold,” a book about the group.
NEWS
May 12, 1987 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Because it is surrounded by a 10-foot fence and by guards, "many people think this place is a prison," said Thomas Miller, officer in charge of the gray-granite building just off Market Street north of the Mission District. "We try to keep a low profile." Carved in stone over the front doors, however, are the words E PLURIBUS UNUM.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer, This post has been corrected. Please see details below.
Gold coins worth $10 million that were discovered by a Northern California couple were not likely stolen in a 1901 U.S. Mint theft in San Francisco, an official said Tuesday. “We do not have any information linking the Saddle Ridge Hoard coins to any thefts at any United States Mint facility,” U.S. Mint spokesman Adam Stump said in a statement, adding that lawyers have looked into the matter. In 1901, six bags of double eagle gold coins -- 250 $20 coins in each -- went missing from the San Francisco Mint.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
A senior expert at the firm representing a Northern California couple who discovered buried gold coins worth $10 million says he  has not received any credible claims to the huge find and does not expect to. Numerous theories have cropped up since the discovery of the Saddle Ridge Hoard was announced last week. One of them, that the coins were tied to  a 1901 U.S. Mint theft in San Francisco, appeared to be debunked Tuesday by the U.S. Mint itself. “We do not have any information linking the Saddle Ridge Hoard coins to any thefts at any United States Mint facility,” U.S. Mint spokesman Adam Stump said in a statement, adding that lawyers have looked into the matter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
The news of a Northern California couple's discovery of more than 1,400 gold coins hidden on their property has experts, history buffs and regular folks speculating on the treasure's origin. Though officials said it is unlikely the coins were stolen in a turn-of-the-century theft at the U.S. Mint in San Francisco, some wonder if the cache could be one of many believed buried by the  Knights of the Golden Circle . The secretive, subversive Confederate group is thought to have hidden millions in ill-gotten gold across a dozen states to finance a second Civil War. PHOTOS: California couple discovers cache of gold coins The coins very well could be a fortune buried by a wealthy businessman, but the time period, markers near the cache and manner in which the coins were buried fit the mold of the KGC, said Warren Getler, a former Wall Street Journal reporter who coauthored “Rebel Gold,” a book about the group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Board of Supervisors has approved an ordinance that would allow the San Francisco Museum and Historical Society to raise money to renovate the Old Mint. The measure, approved Monday, would allow the sale of the Old Mint's transferable development rights to finance historic renovation and preservation work at the building. "This is an innovative way to restore a national landmark without using a penny of taxpayer dollars," said Supervisor Aaron Peskin, who sponsored the ordinance.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A dime struck in 1894 at the San Francisco mint was auctioned in Baltimore for $1,322,500, a coin dealer said. The winning bidder took part in the sale by phone and was not identified. The coin, described as being in nearly pristine condition, was one of only 24 dimes made that year at the San Francisco mint, whose director had requested them as gifts for visiting bankers. The coin was consigned to the auction by Bradley Hirst of Richmond, Ind., who bought it for $825,000 six years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
A senior expert at the firm representing a Northern California couple who discovered buried gold coins worth $10 million says he  has not received any credible claims to the huge find and does not expect to. Numerous theories have cropped up since the discovery of the Saddle Ridge Hoard was announced last week. One of them, that the coins were tied to  a 1901 U.S. Mint theft in San Francisco, appeared to be debunked Tuesday by the U.S. Mint itself. “We do not have any information linking the Saddle Ridge Hoard coins to any thefts at any United States Mint facility,” U.S. Mint spokesman Adam Stump said in a statement, adding that lawyers have looked into the matter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer, This post has been corrected. Please see details below.
Gold coins worth $10 million that were discovered by a Northern California couple were not likely stolen in a 1901 U.S. Mint theft in San Francisco, an official said Tuesday. “We do not have any information linking the Saddle Ridge Hoard coins to any thefts at any United States Mint facility,” U.S. Mint spokesman Adam Stump said in a statement, adding that lawyers have looked into the matter. In 1901, six bags of double eagle gold coins -- 250 $20 coins in each -- went missing from the San Francisco Mint.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Board of Supervisors has approved an ordinance that would allow the San Francisco Museum and Historical Society to raise money to renovate the Old Mint. The measure, approved Monday, would allow the sale of the Old Mint's transferable development rights to finance historic renovation and preservation work at the building. "This is an innovative way to restore a national landmark without using a penny of taxpayer dollars," said Supervisor Aaron Peskin, who sponsored the ordinance.
NEWS
May 12, 1987 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Because it is surrounded by a 10-foot fence and by guards, "many people think this place is a prison," said Thomas Miller, officer in charge of the gray-granite building just off Market Street north of the Mission District. "We try to keep a low profile." Carved in stone over the front doors, however, are the words E PLURIBUS UNUM.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1986
James A. Baker III, secretary of the Treasury, struck the first U.S. bullion silver dollar in history. It was the first of 1 million, 1-ounce American Eagle silver dollars to be struck at the San Francisco Mint by Nov. 24, when they will be distributed first to 27 bulk dealers nationwide, then to retail outlets for public sale. Hundreds of guests looked on as Baker struck the silver blank twice, as is done with special coins to sharpen the impressions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years it was tucked away in a safe deposit box, but soon a rare two-tailed coin will be in the national spotlight. The 1965 Washington quarter-dollar struck from two reverse dies has been authenticated by one of the nation's top coin certification services, which estimated its value at between $75,00 and $100,000. The coin's owner, an Encino-based collector and dealer, will display the unusual quarter for the first time next month at the American Numismatic Assn.
NEWS
October 30, 1986 | Associated Press
With a hearty cry of "Hi-yo silver, away!" U.S. Treasury Secretary James A. Baker III on Wednesday struck the first U.S. bullion silver dollar. It was the first of a million one-ounce American Eagle silver dollars that will be struck at the San Francisco Mint by Nov. 24, when they will be distributed first to 27 bulk dealers nationwide, then to retail outlets for public sale.
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