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February 22, 2009 | Liesl Bradner
Artist Kerry James Marshall is taking on two of the most celebrated U.S. presidents on a grandiose scale. The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art commissioned Marshall to create two murals -- colorful, psychic landscapes of Mount Vernon and Monticello -- which will be on display beginning this week. The murals, which measure 27 feet by 32 feet, are painted on diagonal suspended walls of the Haas Atrium.
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September 2, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
Naoya Hatakeyama, well known in Japan for his large-scale photographs of man's impact on natural settings, can trace his fascination with altered landscapes to his childhood growing up around limestone quarries in the town of Rikuzentakata, where his father worked in a cement factory. "He is drawn to places in flux, where some sort of industrial situation is happening," noted Lisa Sutcliffe, assistant curator at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where Hatakeyama's first solo exhibition in the U.S., "Natural Stories," runs through Nov. 4. Organized in conjunction with the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, the photos span his career during the last three decades.
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TRAVEL
February 2, 1997
Tickets are on sale for the 50th Annual Festival of Houses and Gardens, March 20-April 19 in historic Charleston, S.C. Each daily event costs $30. Last year's festival sold out, so reservations are advised. Information: (803) 722-3405. . . . Pulitzer Prize-winning author William Styron will give a free reading at 8:30 p.m. Saturday at the Lodge at Koele resort on the Hawaiian island of Lanai. Information: (808) 949-4131. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2011 | By Michael J. Ybarra, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The pair of sepia photographs show a man sitting precariously on the edge of a rock, itself balanced none-too-reassuringly atop a cliff overlooking one of the great views in the world: Yosemite Valley. It's an image that speaks both to the grandeur of the West and the 19th century's desire to unlock the secrets of nature. The prints — meant to give a three-dimensional image when viewed through a stereograph device — were taken in 1872 by Eadweard Muybridge, a pioneering photographer whose work helped pave the way for motion pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2004 | Suzanne Muchnic
The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art has revived its New Work exhibition series with site-specific installations by two Los Angeles-based artists who fiddle with nature, Evan Holloway and Dave Muller. On view through Oct. 24, Holloway's "Map" is a three-dimensional, geometric configuration of tree branches, joined at right angles and painted on one side with a spectrum of color and on the other with a scale of grays.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | DAVID COLKER, david.colker@latimes.com
Ed Glaze of Port Mansfield, Texas, (population 800) never imagined that snapshots of his house, rental property and mother's carwash business would make it onto a wall of the prestigious San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Glaze is not an artist. He's a Realtor with a Web site. And he didn't even know his pictures had been on display for the last several weeks in "Ed Glaze III," a work that is part of the exhibit "010101: Art in Technological Times." "Well, how about that," said Glaze, 46.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1985 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
Two photography exhibitions of unusual interest are coming to the Bay Area: "L'Amour Fou: Photography and Surrealism" at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Friday to Feb. 16, and a major retrospective of the work of Irving Penn at the University Art Museum, UC Berkeley, Jan. 22 to March 16.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1995 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Let the games begin! What games? Why, the North/South Art Museum Games. Today the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) opens its new $62-million facility, one of the last in the building boom that has characterized the American museum world in the past 20 years. The official story is that SFMOMA had outgrown the cramped, inhospitable quarters it had occupied in the Civic Center since 1935. The official story isn't wrong, just incomplete.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1988 | SAM HALL KAPLAN, Times Design Critic
One of the more coveted architectural assignments in recent years, the design of a new San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, has gone to Swiss architect Mario Botta. In a surprise announcement Wednesday, the museum said it was canceling its widely publicized architectural competition for the new building and going with the 45-year-old Botta. Botta, along with the firms of Hammond Beeby & Babka of Chicago, and Frank O.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1998 | Suzanne Muchnic
'Is it difficult to leave New York?" David A. Ross quipped to an interviewer when asked about ending his seven-year tenure as director of the Whitney Museum of American Art on July 1 to take charge of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, "I can't believe you are asking that, as an Angeleno. I thought L.A. had become the new center. Now it's my job to make San Francisco the new center.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner, Los Angeles Times
For wine aficionados, 1976 was a revolutionary year. Not only were Americans celebrating 200 years of independence, but a little wine contest held in France also ushered in an exciting new era in wine consumption and culture. The Judgment in Paris, the legendary blind taste test, had nine French wine experts choosing Northern California wines over esteemed French vintages. That historic contest helped boost global production and vinuous appreciation. The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art's exhibition "How Wine Became Modern: Design + Wine 1976 to Now" takes a look at the role of art and design in the transformation of the wine industry over the last three decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2010 | By bloomberg news
The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art said it raised $250 million to boost its endowment and build a new wing that will triple the size of its galleries and house the collection of Gap Inc. founders Donald and Doris Fisher. The gifts from the museum's leadership bring it more than halfway toward a $480-million goal. From funds raised so far, $100 million is earmarked to double the endowment. The rest will go toward the expansion. The project will increase the museum's current galleries to 150,000 square feet and consolidate offices scattered around the neighborhood into one building.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2009 | Liesl Bradner
Artist Kerry James Marshall is taking on two of the most celebrated U.S. presidents on a grandiose scale. The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art commissioned Marshall to create two murals -- colorful, psychic landscapes of Mount Vernon and Monticello -- which will be on display beginning this week. The murals, which measure 27 feet by 32 feet, are painted on diagonal suspended walls of the Haas Atrium.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2006 | Christopher Miles, Special to The Times
SHE studied with masters amid America's Modernist ascendancy and while a student garnered attention in Time magazine. At 24, she showed in a San Francisco Museum of Modern Art group exhibition and four years later, in 1954, had her first solo show in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2004 | Suzanne Muchnic
The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art has revived its New Work exhibition series with site-specific installations by two Los Angeles-based artists who fiddle with nature, Evan Holloway and Dave Muller. On view through Oct. 24, Holloway's "Map" is a three-dimensional, geometric configuration of tree branches, joined at right angles and painted on one side with a spectrum of color and on the other with a scale of grays.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2003 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
San Francisco The catalog cover to the marvelous Philip Guston retrospective at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art shows a detail of his 1958 painting "To Fellini." Interlocked like chunky stones in an ancient wall are bright, brushy slathers of thick oil paint -- red, white, pink, violet, brown, blue, green and black, as well as smeary blends where colors overlap and the medium-size brush picked up neighboring pigment.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art announced plans for a new $70-million museum structure at a press conference Wednesday morning attended by mayor Art Agnos, museum director John R. Lane and other officials. The museum, a pioneering institution in the field, will construct a new building of about 160,000 square feet on a lot south of Market Street on Third Street between Mission and Howard streets. Plans call for completion in 1993. The new structure will be a near-neighbor to a massive $1.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1998 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a significant expansion of its permanent collection, the trustees of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art have acquired for the museum 23 works by prominent 20th century artists valued at $40 million, officials announced Thursday. The acquisitions coincide with the arrival of the museum's new director, David A.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | DAVID COLKER, david.colker@latimes.com
Ed Glaze of Port Mansfield, Texas, (population 800) never imagined that snapshots of his house, rental property and mother's carwash business would make it onto a wall of the prestigious San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Glaze is not an artist. He's a Realtor with a Web site. And he didn't even know his pictures had been on display for the last several weeks in "Ed Glaze III," a work that is part of the exhibit "010101: Art in Technological Times." "Well, how about that," said Glaze, 46.
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