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November 5, 2002 | Diane Haithman
San Francisco Opera has been slapped with a $70,000 fine by the California Occupational Safety and Health Administration after a June 27 accident in which stagehand Francis Kenny, 43, suffered a broken leg and head trauma after falling 22 feet from a hydraulic lift while removing scenery. Cal-OSHA has cited the opera for allegedly knowing it was improperly using the lift when it tipped over, causing Kenny to crash to the floor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
The National Endowment for the Arts is helping to fund the Southern California premiere of John Adams' controversial opera "The Death of Klinghoffer," 23 years after it was first performed. The $25,000 grant to the adventurous Long Beach Opera for its March staging of the piece was among $25.8 million in new awards announced Wednesday to nonprofit arts organizations and writers nationwide. “The Death of Klinghoffer," sung in English with a libretto by Alice Goodman, retells the story of Palestinian hijackers' 1985 murder of an Jewish American passenger aboard an Italian cruise ship they had commandeered.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
SAN FRANCISCO - There have been, in modern times, three Marilyns, a couple of Lulus and Lolitas, and many Moby Dicks with their own operas. Now, suddenly and out of the blue, we have two new operas, or in this case operatic Passion plays, about Mary Magdalene. Fast on the heels of the Los Angeles Philharmonic's premiere of John Adams' "The Gospel According to the Other Mary" last year and Peter Sellars' staging this year, comes Mark Adamo's "The Gospel of Mary Magdalene," commissioned by San Francisco Opera and given its premiere Wednesday night in War Memorial Opera House.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
SAN FRANCISCO - A Stephen King opera had to happen. Many of his 56 novels have been made into movies and have spent time on bestseller lists, making King a king of pop culture accessibility - just what the opera world lusts after these days. Moreover, Maine's master of the supernatural is also fast rising in the ranks of literary respectability. On my way to see Tobias Picker's new opera based on "Dolores Claiborne" at San Francisco Opera on Wednesday night, I stopped off at University Press Books in Berkeley.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
SAN FRANCISCO - A production here of John Adams' "Nixon in China" begins with a goose-bump gorgeous projection on a scrim in front of the stage of Air Force One gracefully gliding into Beijing through slate gray clouds on a winter's day. Lawrence Renes, a Dutch conductor in his early 40s making his San Francisco Opera debut, creates a viscerally silky sound from Adams' brilliantly atmospheric orchestral prologue. The rest of Michael Cavanagh's production, a product of Vancouver Opera, may not entirely live up to this beginning, but the specialness of the moment is significant.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1988
Lotfi Mansouri, head of the Canadian Opera in Toronto, will become the new general director of the San Francisco Opera, it was announced Friday. Mansouri, 58, had been a leading candidate for the position since the resignation of Terence McEwen last month. The job was offered to Mansouri on Tuesday, after Los Angeles Philharmonic executive director Ernest Fleischmann withdrew his name from consideration.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
SAN FRANCISCO - A Stephen King opera had to happen. Many of his 56 novels have been made into movies and have spent time on bestseller lists, making King a king of pop culture accessibility - just what the opera world lusts after these days. Moreover, Maine's master of the supernatural is also fast rising in the ranks of literary respectability. On my way to see Tobias Picker's new opera based on "Dolores Claiborne" at San Francisco Opera on Wednesday night, I stopped off at University Press Books in Berkeley.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Musicians of the San Francisco Opera Orchestra ratified a five-year contract with the company that will restore pay cuts made during the previous contract. The agreement was reached after a week of negotiations and well in advance of the current contract's expiration date in August, representatives from both sides said. "Both sides were ecstatic," said trumpeter Bill Holmes, who chaired the players' negotiating committee. "When does that ever happen?"
NEWS
December 6, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sir John Pritchard, the distinguished Mozartian who was equally at home conducting in leading opera houses and principal concert halls of the world, died Tuesday in a hospital in Daly City, near San Francisco. A spokesman for the San Francisco Opera, where Pritchard had been music director since 1986, said he was 68 and had cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
Nine years after its world premiere in Rotterdam, and following U.S. stagings in New York, Chicago and Seattle, Philip Glass' controversial and haunting "Satyagraha" finally reached California this week, courtesy of San Francisco Opera. David Pountney's original production (re-staged here by Harry Silverstein) and Robert Israel's designs occupy the War Memorial Opera House handsomely. The performance, conducted once again by Bruce Ferden, puts across Glass' extended meditation on the life of Mohandas K. Gandhi in an aura of compelling visual and musical images.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
Lotfi Mansouri, the spirited former general director of the San Francisco Opera whose desire to democratize the operatic experience for a modern audience spurred the use of projected translations in performances, has died. He was 84. Mansouri died Aug. 30 at his home in San Francisco from complications of pancreatic cancer, the San Francisco Opera said. The Iranian-born opera director and administrator ran the San Francisco company from 1988 to 2001, taking on ambitious commissions such as Jake Heggie's "Dead Man Walking" and Andre Previn's adaptation of the Tennessee Williams classic "A Streetcar Named Desire.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2013 | By David Ng
Renée Fleming will return to Los Angeles Opera later this season in a production of André Previn's "A Streetcar Named Desire," which is scheduled to run for three performances at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on May 18, 21 and 24, 2014. The production will mark the first time that Fleming has performed in an opera for the company since her 2006 role in "La Traviata. " (She has appeared in recitals for L.A. Opera in the interim.) Fleming, who plays Blanche DuBois in the adaptation of the Tennessee Williams play, first performed in the role in 1998 at San Francisco Opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
SAN FRANCISCO - There have been, in modern times, three Marilyns, a couple of Lulus and Lolitas, and many Moby Dicks with their own operas. Now, suddenly and out of the blue, we have two new operas, or in this case operatic Passion plays, about Mary Magdalene. Fast on the heels of the Los Angeles Philharmonic's premiere of John Adams' "The Gospel According to the Other Mary" last year and Peter Sellars' staging this year, comes Mark Adamo's "The Gospel of Mary Magdalene," commissioned by San Francisco Opera and given its premiere Wednesday night in War Memorial Opera House.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Opera, in our parts, has embarked upon an exceptional period of expansion. Up and down the California coast, the staging of new and recent work possibly outnumbers old. This year, moving from south to north, UC San Diego in La Jolla has had two major world premieres; Long Beach Opera has given us three regional or U.S. premieres; Santa Monica's Broad Stage is offering the world premiere of Lee Holdridge's "Dolce Rosa"; the Los Angeles Philharmonic has...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
Amid the just-quieting lunch rush at Kendall's Brasserie in downtown Los Angeles, there is no question who the international opera stars are. Portuguese soprano Elisabete Matos and Icelandic baritone Tomas Tomasson sit tucked away at a nondescript table; but their clear, mellifluous voices cut through the din of the restaurant. When Tomasson chuckles, it sends a gentle, merry rumble across the floorboards. Both performers are new to L.A., a city Tomasson finds "huuuge!" he bellows.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By David Ng, Sherry Stern and Mark Swed
This post has been updated. "The Death of Klinghoffer," the controversial 1991 opera by John Adams, is scheduled to make its much-belated Los Angeles-area debut in March 2014. But the producing company won't be L.A. Opera, which was one of several groups that commissioned the piece. Long Beach Opera said it will present the work as part of its season next year, in a staging directed by James Robinson. The dates and venue for the performances have not been announced.  In April 2014, the production will be part of the Los Angeles Philharmonic's recently announced "Minimalist Jukebox" festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1985 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
"Lear" is not a hot ticket these days at the War Memorial Opera House. Aribert Reimann's stark, provocative, uncompromising adaptation of the Shakespeare play does not offer local fans an opportunity to encounter a beloved diva bathing in verismo gush. For that the devout must go to "Adriana Lecouvreur" with Mirella Freni, which opened the season last week. Nor does the modern Germanic tragedy offer canary fanciers a chance to adulate a gurgling diva in an ornate vocal circus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Terence A. McEwen, for six years the general director of the San Francisco Opera, has died at his home in Honolulu. He was 69. McEwen, who resigned the post in 1988 citing chronic diabetes, died Sept. 14 of a heart attack. He suffered a stroke a few years ago. Devoted to opera, McEwen spent much of his career in the classical music recording business. A native of Canada, he joined Decca records in London in 1950 and moved to New York in 1959 to manage Decca's London records classical division.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013 | By David Ng
Operatic tenor Jay Hunter Morris has withdrawn from Los Angeles Opera's upcoming production of Wagner's "The Flying Dutchman," which is scheduled to begin performances on March 9 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Morris, a Texan noted for his Wagnerian roles, has come down with "a severe case of gastroenteritis," according to the singer's agent. The illness is preventing Morris from participating in rehearsals for "Dutchman. " The tenor was to have played the role of Erik in Wagner's opera that was inspired by the legend of a ghost ship.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2012
Those zombies in "The Walking Dead" have already terrorized the good people of Atlanta. Now they're gobbling down the ratings record books too. AMC's zombie smash has become the first cable series to win the fall TV ratings in the important, advertiser-friendly demographic of viewers ages 18 to 49, according to Nielsen, when DVR playbacks are included. That includes established network series such as "Modern Family," "The Voice" and "The Big Bang Theory," as well as the new fall shows such as "Elementary" and "Revolution.
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