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NEWS
April 20, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city government here is poised to become the first in California to require that many departments hire workers who speak either Spanish or Chinese, in an effort to provide services to a fast-growing population of immigrants not proficient in English. With census figures showing that 35% of this East Bay city's residents are Asian or Latino, the City Council is scheduled to vote Tuesday on whether to make all departments that have contact with the public hire bilingual employees.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2010 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
The California Supreme Court debated the constitutionality of Proposition 209 on Tuesday, questioning whether the reach of the 1996 ban on affirmative action in government should be limited. During a hearing Tuesday, some members of the state high court appeared inclined to permit some type of affirmative action when needed to address deliberate and ongoing discrimination. The court is reviewing a San Francisco ordinance that gives firms owned by women and minorities an advantage in city contracting.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1990 | HAROLD MAASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The county Board of Supervisors is scheduled to act on a resolution condemning a federal grand jury investigation of a prominent local photographer caught up in an apparent FBI crackdown on sexually explicit photographs processed by commercial photo laboratories. At issue is an FBI investigation of photographer Jock Sturges, 43, whose work often depicts nude women and children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2004 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
For years, Starbucks, Rite Aid, Walgreens and other corporate chains have felt the wrath of residents determined to freeze them out and protect the home-grown charm of this city's diverse neighborhoods. Now San Franciscans have translated that passion into policy. Late last month, the Board of Supervisors passed an ordinance restricting so-called formula retail stores from opening their doors here.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1991 | DANIEL ASKT
It's strange behavior for a fat cat. Five mornings a week, Jim Smith rises at midnight to work the graveyard shift as a mail handler. When he gets off at 9:30 a.m., he begins his building maintenance chores. Smith had hoped to quit the Postal Service long ago, but he made one big mistake. He plowed his hard-earned money into rental housing in Berkeley, where he and many other working-class landlords were stuck with 1970s rents and no way to recoup investments in their own property.
NEWS
February 15, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the debut of a landmark new law, hundreds of gay and lesbian couples celebrated Valentine's Day here by doing the next best thing to getting married. They got partnered. For the first time ever Thursday, the pairs could swap rings, flowers and kisses in a short civil ceremony, plunk down a $35 fee and walk away with purple and white certificates of domestic partnership.
NEWS
September 4, 1988
City Atty. Louise Renne of San Francisco has ordered her staff to prepare a sex discrimination lawsuit against the 128-year-old Olympic Club. In addition, Renne said she has asked the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to determine whether the club's liquor license can be revoked on the basis of the alleged discrimination. The lawsuit would be the first legal test of a city anti-discrimination ordinance adopted in November, 1987.
NEWS
February 3, 1988 | Associated Press
City officials, disturbed by "anarchy in the neighborhoods," temporarily banned demolition of all single-family homes, including some picturesque Victorians, effective Tuesday. The Board of Supervisors unanimously adopted the five-month moratorium despite claims it will cost construction jobs and new homes in a city known for scarce and expensive housing.
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | Associated Press
Mayor Willie Brown postponed his plan to have police seize shopping carts from street people Tuesday, saying that advocates for the homeless have overreacted and misrepresented his idea. "There's no sweep. There's no confiscation of goods and services of people," Brown said. "It's not anything near the hysteria that I have read and heard surrounding this."
NEWS
September 11, 1999 | From Reuters
San Francisco's Commission of Animal Control and Welfare has voted to recommend changing city laws to include the term "pet guardian" when referring to relationships between animals and people. The move, championed by the animal rights group In Defense of Animals, was passed by a commission vote Thursday and sent to the Board of Supervisors, which has the power to order the change.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Board of Supervisors gave preliminary approval Monday to Mayor Willie Brown's groundbreaking legislation that would require city contractors and leaseholders to provide health coverage for their workers. The Health Care Accountability Ordinance is expected to ensure basic health insurance for about 16,000 of the about 130,000 uninsured people in San Francisco. The health coverage mandate on city contractors is believed to be the first of its kind in the nation.
NEWS
April 20, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city government here is poised to become the first in California to require that many departments hire workers who speak either Spanish or Chinese, in an effort to provide services to a fast-growing population of immigrants not proficient in English. With census figures showing that 35% of this East Bay city's residents are Asian or Latino, the City Council is scheduled to vote Tuesday on whether to make all departments that have contact with the public hire bilingual employees.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | From Reuters
A prestigious ballet school has been accused of violating San Francisco's new law against size discrimination for rejecting a young ballerina allegedly deemed too large. In a complaint lodged with the city's Human Rights Commission, 8-year-old Fredrika Keefer and her mother, Krissy Keefer, say the San Francisco Ballet School dashed Fredrika's dreams because she did not fit criteria requiring applicants to have "a well-proportioned, slender body."
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | MAURA DOLAN and EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge Monday blocked laws in Santa Monica and San Francisco that prevent banks from imposing surcharges on the use of their automated teller machines by customers of other banks. The preliminary injunction by U.S. District Court Judge Vaughn R. Walker that will allow banks to continue charging their fees will last until he can hold a full trial on the matter.
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | Associated Press
Mayor Willie Brown postponed his plan to have police seize shopping carts from street people Tuesday, saying that advocates for the homeless have overreacted and misrepresented his idea. "There's no sweep. There's no confiscation of goods and services of people," Brown said. "It's not anything near the hysteria that I have read and heard surrounding this."
NEWS
September 11, 1999 | From Reuters
San Francisco's Commission of Animal Control and Welfare has voted to recommend changing city laws to include the term "pet guardian" when referring to relationships between animals and people. The move, championed by the animal rights group In Defense of Animals, was passed by a commission vote Thursday and sent to the Board of Supervisors, which has the power to order the change.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Board of Supervisors gave preliminary approval Monday to Mayor Willie Brown's groundbreaking legislation that would require city contractors and leaseholders to provide health coverage for their workers. The Health Care Accountability Ordinance is expected to ensure basic health insurance for about 16,000 of the about 130,000 uninsured people in San Francisco. The health coverage mandate on city contractors is believed to be the first of its kind in the nation.
NEWS
May 14, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
U.S. airlines filed a federal suit Tuesday to block a San Francisco ordinance requiring them to offer health benefits to domestic partners of their employees. The lawsuit filed by the Air Transport Assn., which represents the nation's major airlines, says the city has no right to regulate air carriers.
NEWS
September 7, 1999 | VERONIQUE de TURENNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A day in this city's unkind rental market can make winning the lottery look like a sure thing. Dozens of prospective tenants vie for each opening. The vacancy rate hovers at 1%. A two-bedroom apartment in a desirable neighborhood typically rents for more than $2,000 a month--and stays on the market for less than a day. Small wonder then that the latest wrinkle in rent control in San Francisco addresses the seemingly simple matter of renters bringing in roommates to replace those who moved out.
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