Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSan Francisco Public Works
IN THE NEWS

San Francisco Public Works

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day, as she watches thousands of drivers nose their cars up the freeway onramp that curves just a few feet beyond the floor-to-ceiling windows of her downtown loft, Toni Lee counts herself lucky to be in San Francisco. "I love it," Lee, a graphic artist, says of living and working alongside the noisy, crowded sweep of concrete. "It is an urban forest. It captures the energy of this city." Energy. The word most commonly used these days when San Franciscans describe their city.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 6, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It isn't the "Taj MaWillie" that wags say he was aiming for, but a beaming Mayor Willie Brown presided Tuesday over the reopening of a restored City Hall that reflects both his own appreciation of the finer things in life and San Francisco's belief in itself as the nation's most beautiful city. Surrounded by a bevy of dignitaries, Brown cut a blue-and-gold ribbon and ushered crowds of curious citizens into the elegant Beaux Arts building shortly after noon.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 6, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It isn't the "Taj MaWillie" that wags say he was aiming for, but a beaming Mayor Willie Brown presided Tuesday over the reopening of a restored City Hall that reflects both his own appreciation of the finer things in life and San Francisco's belief in itself as the nation's most beautiful city. Surrounded by a bevy of dignitaries, Brown cut a blue-and-gold ribbon and ushered crowds of curious citizens into the elegant Beaux Arts building shortly after noon.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day, as she watches thousands of drivers nose their cars up the freeway onramp that curves just a few feet beyond the floor-to-ceiling windows of her downtown loft, Toni Lee counts herself lucky to be in San Francisco. "I love it," Lee, a graphic artist, says of living and working alongside the noisy, crowded sweep of concrete. "It is an urban forest. It captures the energy of this city." Energy. The word most commonly used these days when San Franciscans describe their city.
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Engineers are designing huge shock absorbers strong enough to slow and dampen movement of the Golden Gate Bridge during a major earthquake. The shock absorbers were among some of the $134 million of improvements outlined in a progress report to the bridge board. The bridge's chief engineer, Daniel E. Mohn, said engineers are working on a design that would stop the suspended portion of the bridge from ramming into the two 746-foot high towers.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal Highway Administration bureaucrats have decided that San Franciscans will have to put up with the earthquake-damaged Embarcadero Freeway at least until April, state officials said. Mayor Art Agnos, his staff and the state Department of Transportation had been under the impression that demolition of the elevated roadway could begin in January. But Caltrans officials said federal regulations require an environmental report before the 80,000 tons of freeway can be removed.
NEWS
June 16, 1996 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At long last, Los Angeles is getting some respect from San Francisco, the city that loves to think of itself as vastly more beautiful and infinitely more sophisticated than its neighbor to the south. Casting about for a signature landscape element for its first grand boulevard, the city settled on none other than the palm tree, a much-maligned symbol of Los Angeles and a rarity in this land of redwoods and sequoias.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2001 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Los Angeles officials want a glimpse of what might result from their decision to install 150 pay toilets around town, including in its most downtrodden areas, they need only consult Robert Anderson. Each day, the downtown parking attendant watches drug-addled street denizens with their shaking hands and dirty bedrolls congregate at the corner of 6th and Mission on San Francisco's skid row. At the oval-shaped pay toilet, one of 25 installed by the same French company with which L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2001 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Computer giant IBM will pay $100,000 and cover the cost of scouring hundreds of peace symbol graffiti stencils from city sidewalks after what miffed officials here call a misguided guerrilla street ploy this spring to promote the company's new product line. The world's largest computer company has also apologized to officials for its campaign to spray-paint city streets with hundreds of cartoonish fist-sized symbols.
NEWS
December 13, 1995 | DAN MORAIN and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Wet, stormy weather with winds gusting to 100 mph blew through Northern California again Tuesday, leaving two people dead and 650,000 without power while forcing the closure of San Francisco-area bridges to truck traffic. By midday, the sun was shining and the wind had calmed as San Franciscans cast votes for mayor and voters in San Jose elected a new congressman, but more showers were expected to pelt the Bay Area for the rest of the week.
NEWS
June 16, 1996 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At long last, Los Angeles is getting some respect from San Francisco, the city that loves to think of itself as vastly more beautiful and infinitely more sophisticated than its neighbor to the south. Casting about for a signature landscape element for its first grand boulevard, the city settled on none other than the palm tree, a much-maligned symbol of Los Angeles and a rarity in this land of redwoods and sequoias.
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Engineers are designing huge shock absorbers strong enough to slow and dampen movement of the Golden Gate Bridge during a major earthquake. The shock absorbers were among some of the $134 million of improvements outlined in a progress report to the bridge board. The bridge's chief engineer, Daniel E. Mohn, said engineers are working on a design that would stop the suspended portion of the bridge from ramming into the two 746-foot high towers.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal Highway Administration bureaucrats have decided that San Franciscans will have to put up with the earthquake-damaged Embarcadero Freeway at least until April, state officials said. Mayor Art Agnos, his staff and the state Department of Transportation had been under the impression that demolition of the elevated roadway could begin in January. But Caltrans officials said federal regulations require an environmental report before the 80,000 tons of freeway can be removed.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|