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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1995
Q: How do trick birthday candles that will not blow out work? A: According to scientists at San Francisco's Exploratorium, small particles of gunpowder are woven into the wick. When the candle is lit, you'll notice that the wick occasionally shoots off little sparks as it burns. When you blow the candle out, the wick continues to glow for a few seconds. The glowing wick is hot enough to ignite the gunpowder, which reignites the wick.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2009 | By Jesse Cohen
Something Incredibly Wonderful Happens Frank Oppenheimer and the World He Made Up K.C. Cole Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 416 pp., $27 Skills or content? This is an age-old question in education, currently taking the form of "21st Century Skills" versus "Cultural Literacy." Simply put, should children be taught how to do things, or to know stuff? Both arguments have merit, but the problem with the skills-content dichotomy is that it leaves out an essential ingredient: the sense of curiosity, exploration and discovery, without which no learning can truly happen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1996 | MARTHA IRVINE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's not always easy for Ned Kahn to explain what he does for a living. He's part artist, part scientist, part kid. And he uses things like water hoses, cloudy fluids and sand-like glass beads to create tornadoes and sandstorms. "Oh," said a businesswoman who once sat next to him on an airplane. "So you're kind of a fine arts plumber." Or a rebel with a hose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1996 | MARTHA IRVINE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's not always easy for Ned Kahn to explain what he does for a living. He's part artist, part scientist, part kid. And he uses things like water hoses, cloudy fluids and sand-like glass beads to create tornadoes and sandstorms. "Oh," said a businesswoman who once sat next to him on an airplane. "So you're kind of a fine arts plumber." Or a rebel with a hose.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2009 | By Jesse Cohen
Something Incredibly Wonderful Happens Frank Oppenheimer and the World He Made Up K.C. Cole Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 416 pp., $27 Skills or content? This is an age-old question in education, currently taking the form of "21st Century Skills" versus "Cultural Literacy." Simply put, should children be taught how to do things, or to know stuff? Both arguments have merit, but the problem with the skills-content dichotomy is that it leaves out an essential ingredient: the sense of curiosity, exploration and discovery, without which no learning can truly happen.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Jay Jones
if you're looking for places that will delight children, consider San Francisco's Exploratorium, Legoland California and the Twirl Toy Store and Play Space in Taos, N.M., Those are among the 15 attractions that CNN says will keep kids—and their parents— happy. CNN created its " 15 Best Spots for Kids " list from the Travelers' Favorites list compiled by travel site Gogobot . No. 1 on the list: San Francisco's Exploratorium . You'll see nearly as many adults as you will kids in this "learning lab" that's now at Pier 15. Its exhibits deal with sound, color, biology—really the gamut of life, including the quirky toothpick sculpture above by Scott Weaver, a 37-years-in-the-making creation that consists of more than 105,000 toothpicks.  Legoland California  in Carlsbad ranks eighth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1995
Q: How do trick birthday candles that will not blow out work? A: According to scientists at San Francisco's Exploratorium, small particles of gunpowder are woven into the wick. When the candle is lit, you'll notice that the wick occasionally shoots off little sparks as it burns. When you blow the candle out, the wick continues to glow for a few seconds. The glowing wick is hot enough to ignite the gunpowder, which reignites the wick.
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