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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Lawmakers in Sacramento have decided on a Bay Bridge earthquake retrofitting deal that requires the state to pay about 40% of the $1.46 billion needed for the project. The state will also need to cover up to $448 million in unanticipated expenses. The deal follows weeks of debate, as well as a standoff that might have put an end to the legislation. Southern California representatives tried to insert amendments into AB 1171, Assemblyman John Dutra's bill.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Lawmakers in Sacramento have decided on a Bay Bridge earthquake retrofitting deal that requires the state to pay about 40% of the $1.46 billion needed for the project. The state will also need to cover up to $448 million in unanticipated expenses. The deal follows weeks of debate, as well as a standoff that might have put an end to the legislation. Southern California representatives tried to insert amendments into AB 1171, Assemblyman John Dutra's bill.
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NEWS
October 25, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON and CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One week to the day after Bay Area quake, the region lurched toward normal as commuters battled another siege of rain squalls, workers began demolishing the Nimitz Freeway--the quake's biggest killer--and officials raised fears that more damage, from mudslides, was on the way. Underscoring the impact of the destructive quake, seismologists who have been studying it round the clock announced that the quake actually measured 7.1, roughly twice the strength of 6.9 magnitude originally assessed.
NEWS
October 25, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON and CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One week to the day after Bay Area quake, the region lurched toward normal as commuters battled another siege of rain squalls, workers began demolishing the Nimitz Freeway--the quake's biggest killer--and officials raised fears that more damage, from mudslides, was on the way. Underscoring the impact of the destructive quake, seismologists who have been studying it round the clock announced that the quake actually measured 7.1, roughly twice the strength of 6.9 magnitude originally assessed.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal and state officials moved quickly Wednesday to help earthquake-stricken Northern California dig itself out and begin to rebuild freeways, bridges, businesses and homes damaged or destroyed by what was probably the nation's deadliest quake since 1906. Promising to "take every step and make every effort" to help the Bay Area, President Bush declared the region a disaster area and authorized what could total hundreds of millions of dollars in federal assistance.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal and state officials moved quickly Wednesday to help earthquake-stricken Northern California dig itself out and begin to rebuild freeways, bridges, businesses and homes damaged or destroyed by what was probably the nation's deadliest quake since 1906. Promising to "take every step and make every effort" to help the Bay Area, President Bush declared the region a disaster area and authorized what could total hundreds of millions of dollars in federal assistance.
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