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NEWS
January 22, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Budget analysts have made it clear that the financial aftershocks from the Oct. 17 earthquake will shape the city's revenues for years to come. In their first major report since the temblor, the city analysts estimated that the disaster has cost San Francisco as much as $15 million in lost revenue from sales, business, parking and hotel taxes. The city anticipated collecting $852 million in revenue overall and the money has already been budgeted.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 1, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Popular home rental website Airbnb will start paying San Francisco's 14% hotel tax, addressing a key regulatory concern. David Hantman, Airbnb's head of global public policy, said in a blog post that "we'll soon be collecting and remitting taxes on behalf of our hosts in San Francisco. " The announcement follows Airbnb 's agreement to start paying hotel taxes in Portland, Ore. The San Francisco Chronicle reported that the move will potentially add millions of dollars of revenue to the city, one of the most popular vacation destinations in the world.
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NEWS
June 15, 1988 | TODD J. GILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Art Agnos, facing a predicted $179.6-million budget deficit, said Tuesday that his staff has found a loophole to raise taxes by $20 million to $30 million, avoiding the need for massive cuts in police, fire and other services. Under an opinion by the city attorney, the city will no longer count court-ordered changes in services toward its Gann spending limit.
TRAVEL
June 16, 1996
A 2% increase in San Francisco's hotel tax, approved by 66% of city voters on March 26 to help pay for expansion of Moscone Convention Center, takes effect July 1. Hotel taxes will climb from 12% to 14% in the city. The new facility, which will add 300,000 square feet of space to the existing building, is expected to open in 2000.
TRAVEL
June 16, 1996
A 2% increase in San Francisco's hotel tax, approved by 66% of city voters on March 26 to help pay for expansion of Moscone Convention Center, takes effect July 1. Hotel taxes will climb from 12% to 14% in the city. The new facility, which will add 300,000 square feet of space to the existing building, is expected to open in 2000.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Popular home rental website Airbnb will start paying San Francisco's 14% hotel tax, addressing a key regulatory concern. David Hantman, Airbnb's head of global public policy, said in a blog post that "we'll soon be collecting and remitting taxes on behalf of our hosts in San Francisco. " The announcement follows Airbnb 's agreement to start paying hotel taxes in Portland, Ore. The San Francisco Chronicle reported that the move will potentially add millions of dollars of revenue to the city, one of the most popular vacation destinations in the world.
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
California homebuilders proposed a $26-billion school construction plan that would be funded by extending the temporary quarter-cent sales tax increase for earthquake relief as long as 25 years. The plan would use money from the tax increase to repay $20 billion in proposed general obligation bonds for classroom construction, said Owen Waters, vice president of the California Building Industry Assn.
TRAVEL
July 12, 2009 | Avital Binshtock
THAILAND, SINGAPORE, CHINA 'Exotic Asia' experience Stand at the bridge over the River Kwai on Ritz Tours' "Exotic Asia." In Thailand, you'll experience Phuket's exotic beaches and Bangkok's rich culture; in Hong Kong, the cosmopolitan bustle, and in Singapore, the hyper-manicured sights. Itinerary: Hong Kong to Bangkok, Phuket and Singapore. Dates: Multiple 16-day departures between July 22 and Feb. 17. Price: From $2,615 (double; single supplement from $900), including round-trip airfare from Los Angeles or San Francisco, taxes, fuel surcharges, flights between destinations, lodging, some meals, entertainment and insurance.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | Elements of the ad with analysis by Times political writer Bill Stall
The race: Governor. Whose ads: Republican Pete Wilson. Cost: The campaign declines to disclose. Producers: Don Sipple and Larry McCarthy. Republican Sen. Pete Wilson began airing two new 30-second television commercials Wednesday, one of them promoting his promises for action if elected governor and the other attacking Democrat Dianne Feinstein's fiscal record as mayor of San Francisco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2003 | George Skelton
Sacramento It wasn't supposed to have played out this way. Given the numbers, it shouldn't have: Republicans rolling over Democrats in a manner unseen in Sacramento since at least the Ronald Reagan era -- and probably not since the GOP-dominated 1950s. Most people -- most people who were not Republican legislators -- believed it was simply impossible to close a $38-billion budget hole without raising taxes. It was, of course, but now we get into semantics. The car tax was tripled, but by Gov.
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
California homebuilders proposed a $26-billion school construction plan that would be funded by extending the temporary quarter-cent sales tax increase for earthquake relief as long as 25 years. The plan would use money from the tax increase to repay $20 billion in proposed general obligation bonds for classroom construction, said Owen Waters, vice president of the California Building Industry Assn.
NEWS
January 22, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Budget analysts have made it clear that the financial aftershocks from the Oct. 17 earthquake will shape the city's revenues for years to come. In their first major report since the temblor, the city analysts estimated that the disaster has cost San Francisco as much as $15 million in lost revenue from sales, business, parking and hotel taxes. The city anticipated collecting $852 million in revenue overall and the money has already been budgeted.
NEWS
June 15, 1988 | TODD J. GILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Art Agnos, facing a predicted $179.6-million budget deficit, said Tuesday that his staff has found a loophole to raise taxes by $20 million to $30 million, avoiding the need for massive cuts in police, fire and other services. Under an opinion by the city attorney, the city will no longer count court-ordered changes in services toward its Gann spending limit.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2003 | Michael Hiltzik
Relations between major property owners and local government officials in a place with left-leaning politics such as San Francisco are never going to be wholly cordial, but it takes a major economic downturn for the knives really to come out. "Some of these corporations have gotten away with murder in the past," County Assessor Mabel Teng was saying the other day.
MAGAZINE
April 12, 1992 | Tom McNichol, Tom McNichol is a San Francisco writer. His last article for this magazine was on suicide prevention.
IN THE PIANO LOUNGES OF THE GRAND HOTELS PERCHED like sentries atop Nob Hill, "I Left My Heart in San Francisco" can still work its magic on a roomful of tourists. For a few luminous moments, every journeyman lounge lizard becomes Tony Bennett. Couples squeeze hands and exchange meaningful glances. The city high on a hill calls to everyone, shimmering like a splendid jewel. Then, too soon, the song is over.
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