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NEWS
October 18, 1989 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Traveling under San Francisco Bay proved to be safer than over it during Tuesday's earthquake. Riders made it safely through BART's four-mile long underwater tunnel linking San Francisco and Oakland. But there were harrowing moments for passengers all along the 71.5-mile Bay Area Rapid Transit system. James Herron Zamora was a passenger on an above-ground BART station in Oakland when the quake hit. "Our train bounced in the air off the tracks and landed again," he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2001 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a drizzly Thursday morning outside the subway station, Yasmin Amador sits in a line of cars that snakes along the curb like a taxi line--ready to commit a cardinal sin of urban life: She's waiting to pick up strangers. Not just any strangers, but two hitchhiking San Francisco-bound commuters--fellow opportunists who would normally hail a bus or hop the subway but who wordlessly slide into Amador's car for a brief drive-time marriage of convenience.
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BUSINESS
February 26, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just when you thought you'd seen every possible ad vehicle, prepare for the painted bus. Public buses sporting huge painted or vinyl ads--stretching almost from headlights to taillights--may soon be rolling down the streets of Los Angeles. Six of these billboard-like buses--flashing ads for Crystal Pepsi, a new clear cola--will hit the streets of San Francisco and the Oakland area next week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2001 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most days, Ralph Sapp feels like a frustrated roadside casualty of this bustling city's downtown delivery wars. The veteran United Parcel Service driver makes 45 harried stops a day along his winding route through North Beach, Chinatown and the Financial District--moving up and down often impossibly hilly streets clogged with buses, scrambling tourists, aggressive cab drivers and clanging cable cars. And amid all the madness, there's usually not a single legal parking place in sight.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | MARK A. STEIN and NORMA KAUFMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When he looks at the elevated Embarcadero Freeway, Mayor Art Agnos sees an opportunity to tear down an aging eyesore and replace it with a sunken parkway that would more befit one of the most scenic parts of a most scenic city. When Chinatown merchants look at Agnos' plan, all they see is red.
NEWS
October 10, 1988 | AMY STEVENS, Times Staff Writer
Sixteen years after it opened, the Bay Area Rapid Transit system seemed headed for its first major expansion. After much political maneuvering, BART this month announced an ambitious plan to extend the state's largest regional rail system to the San Francisco Airport and further into the East Bay.
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | ASHLEY DUNN and KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Cheers broke the gloom along the tomb of rubble that was the Nimitz Freeway when a surprise earthquake survivor--uncovered by a fluke shifting of debris--was carried to safety Saturday after being pinned in a buried air bubble for four chilly Bay Area nights. Laboring fast in a cool rain, workers freed Buck Helm, 57, from his Chevrolet Sprint more than five hours after his waving hand was seen by a rescue worker about 6 a.m.
NEWS
August 18, 1988
Already traffic-clogged Bay Area highways figure to be even twice as congested with commuters by the year 2000, San Francisco planners warned in the city's largest environmental report in history. The region is pumping out more jobs and people than present transit systems can handle, the new study said. It was conducted to gauge the effects the proposed $2-billion Mission Bay housing and office project at San Francisco's China Basin waterfront would have over the next 30 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2001 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a drizzly Thursday morning outside the subway station, Yasmin Amador sits in a line of cars that snakes along the curb like a taxi line--ready to commit a cardinal sin of urban life: She's waiting to pick up strangers. Not just any strangers, but two hitchhiking San Francisco-bound commuters--fellow opportunists who would normally hail a bus or hop the subway but who wordlessly slide into Amador's car for a brief drive-time marriage of convenience.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
State transportation officials have warned riders of San Francisco Bay ferries that they must continue to use the service if they hope to win the battle for extended service between San Francisco and the East Bay. Millions of dollars will be needed to save the service that began in the transportation crisis that followed the Oct. 17 earthquake, officials said. The state Department of Transportation has warned ferry riders that subsidies will run out March 23.
NEWS
April 19, 1999 | VERONIQUE de TURENNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bicycling here is not for the faint of heart. You've got those urban Alps that residents sportingly call hills, wide boulevards dominated by speeding cars, neighborhoods riddled with bewildering warrens of one-way streets and a citywide obstacle course of potholes, grates, curbs and train and trolley tracks. Yet it's not enough to stop San Francisco's cyclists, a dazzlingly diverse and determined group.
NEWS
February 14, 1999 | From Associated Press
There are lots of people who want San Francisco Bay to look more like it used to--teeming with ferries that shuttled passengers back and forth before bridges did the job. On Wednesday, a back-to-the-future plan will be launched, envisioning ferries crisscrossing the bay again to ease gridlock left in the wake of the earlier fleet's demise.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS and MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A massive power outage accidentally caused by electric company workers crippled this busy city and its southern suburbs Tuesday during the morning rush hour, trapping subway commuters under the bay, holding high-rise residents hostage in stalled elevators and slowing business to a crawl. "It appears at this time that simple human error may have been to blame," said a crestfallen Gordon Smith, president of Pacific Gas & Electric.
NEWS
September 14, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bay Area Rapid Transit District and its striking unions reached a tentative agreement Saturday that should have trains running again by Monday morning, both sides announced in the predawn hours. It was good news for stressed-out Bay Area residents, who had slogged through a frustrating work week of endless traffic jams, nightmarish commutes and increased air pollution as BART management and the unions quarreled over wages and pay scales in marathon negotiations.
NEWS
October 30, 1996 | From Associated Press
San Francisco's Central Freeway face lift may be going smoother than expected for commuters, but wait until they hear this. State highway officials have revealed a plan to tear out the backbone of the city's freeway system for a two- to three-year earthquake retrofit project--including much of the approach to the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. "We've got 40 to 50% of the construction in the state taking place just in the Bay Area," said Paul Hensley, the region's deputy director for Caltrans.
NEWS
September 22, 1996 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was supposed to be traffic Armageddon. Instead, it has become the "Mystery of the Missing Commuters." In August, after years of bickering with San Francisco officials and residents, Caltrans closed the Central Freeway in the heart of the city to begin tearing down its earthquake-damaged upper deck. That meant the 80,000 cars that normally used the roadway to travel in and out of the civic center should have been forced onto already-clogged city streets.
NEWS
July 17, 1994 | Associated Press
A strike that could snarl San Francisco Bay Area traffic is slated to start at 12:01 a.m. Monday if a second Bay Area Rapid Transit union votes down a proposed contract. Members of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1555 are expected to reject the proposed contract today. Local 790 of the Service Employees International Union, which represents about 1,400 maintenance and clerical workers, voted 587-325 against the proposed contract Wednesday.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Morrison-Knudsen Tapped for Rail Car Contract: San Francisco has recommended awarding a rail car contract to Morrison-Knudsen Corp. over two Japanese competitors, company officials said. Morrison-Knudsen was the U.S. company that lost out in a controversial decision by Los Angeles County late last year to buy rail cars from a Japanese firm. The decision, later rescinded, sparked a huge "Buy America" outcry.
NEWS
July 18, 1994 | Associated Press
A strike against the Bay Area Rapid Transit District was averted Sunday night when the rail system's board of directors asked Gov. Pete Wilson to intervene. "We expect BART service to be provided as regularly scheduled tomorrow," board President Margaret Pryor said about two hours before a strike was scheduled to start at 12:01 a.m. Monday. Wilson said he had notified all parties that he was appointing a three-judge board to investigate the situation.
NEWS
July 17, 1994 | Associated Press
A strike that could snarl San Francisco Bay Area traffic is slated to start at 12:01 a.m. Monday if a second Bay Area Rapid Transit union votes down a proposed contract. Members of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1555 are expected to reject the proposed contract today. Local 790 of the Service Employees International Union, which represents about 1,400 maintenance and clerical workers, voted 587-325 against the proposed contract Wednesday.
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