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NEWS
May 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A high school senior who has cerebral palsy and uses a wheelchair has filed suit, charging that school officials are excluding her from the senior class picnic and a trip to Disneyland. "I'm very angry and frustrated," said 17-year-old Sascha Bittner. "It's kind of sad because I was really looking forward to my senior year." The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court in San Francisco by the Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund of Berkeley on Bittner's behalf.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2003 | John Johnson and Carol Pogash, Special To The Times
This city's reputation as a world-class tourist destination has long stood in opposition to the grimy realities of its City Hall politics and fractured school system. Now, the deaths of two inner-city students on a wilderness outing in the Los Padres National Forest have not only given the school district another black eye, but also thrown into doubt the future of a program meant to give troubled city kids the survival skills to compete with their suburban counterparts.
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NEWS
November 21, 2000
Ending a two-year legal battle, the San Francisco Unified School District has agreed to give the Stanford 9 achievement test next spring to thousands of students who are not yet fluent in English. The change of heart, part of a settlement announced last week, followed a promise by the state Board of Education to clarify a regulation about testing exemptions.
NEWS
November 21, 2000
Ending a two-year legal battle, the San Francisco Unified School District has agreed to give the Stanford 9 achievement test next spring to thousands of students who are not yet fluent in English. The change of heart, part of a settlement announced last week, followed a promise by the state Board of Education to clarify a regulation about testing exemptions.
NEWS
January 8, 2000 | By MARY CURTIUS,
The Board of Education told a federal judge Friday that it will abandon the effort to use race as a factor in assigning students to city schools, even though district officials say a race-neutral plan will resegregate some schools. "The plan omits racial and ethnic guidelines and racial and ethnic priorities for African American and Latino students," said San Francisco Unified School District spokeswoman Elaine Koury.
NEWS
May 13, 1998 | from Associated Press
The priciest vacant lot in San Francisco, a weedy acre with a Pacific Heights address and a view of the Golden Gate, had a new owner Tuesday. The winner of a high-stakes real estate auction was developer Mitch Menaged, who paid $13.65 million for the 1.1-acre former school site sitting within a block of the homes of the most famous names in San Francisco, including Getty. "It's probably the single remaining best site in one of the best cities in the world," Menaged said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1998
A group of parents at Sherman Oaks Elementary School has raised important questions about the use of pesticides on Los Angeles Unified School District campuses. The parents were understandably shaken when some of their children fell ill following a poorly timed outdoor spraying on campus earlier this year intended to kill weeds.
NEWS
April 3, 1998 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state sued San Francisco's public school district Thursday for its refusal to administer California's new standardized achievement test to students with limited English skills. The lawsuit, filed in San Francisco Superior Court, represents the toughest move yet by State Supt. of Public Instruction Delaine Eastin in demanding that California schools comply with a state requirement that all students in grades 2 through 11 take the test.
NEWS
February 29, 1996 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Addressing an unusual controversy over racial preferences, the San Francisco Board of Education revamped the admissions policy at its premier academic high school to eliminate a requirement that held Chinese American students to a higher standard than whites and other racial and ethnic groups.
NEWS
May 23, 1998 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A San Francisco judge ruled Friday that the state cannot force 6,000 immigrant students there to participate in a statewide test of reading, math and other skills. The decision by Superior Court Judge David Garcia is a major victory for the San Francisco Unified School District, which had refused to abide by the rules of the state's new STAR test, given for the first time this spring. Garcia's one-sentence order did not explain his reasoning. A spokesman for Gov.
NEWS
January 8, 2000 | By MARY CURTIUS,
The Board of Education told a federal judge Friday that it will abandon the effort to use race as a factor in assigning students to city schools, even though district officials say a race-neutral plan will resegregate some schools. "The plan omits racial and ethnic guidelines and racial and ethnic priorities for African American and Latino students," said San Francisco Unified School District spokeswoman Elaine Koury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1999 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
With soft drink vending machines and fast-food logos sprouting in school hallways, cafeterias and sports arenas, one district has taken an unusual stand against galloping commercialism. Declaring that San Francisco's schoolchildren are not "for sale," the city's school board last month approved a policy to limit commercial advertising and paid endorsements in the city's public schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1998
A group of parents at Sherman Oaks Elementary School has raised important questions about the use of pesticides on Los Angeles Unified School District campuses. The parents were understandably shaken when some of their children fell ill following a poorly timed outdoor spraying on campus earlier this year intended to kill weeds.
NEWS
May 23, 1998 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A San Francisco judge ruled Friday that the state cannot force 6,000 immigrant students there to participate in a statewide test of reading, math and other skills. The decision by Superior Court Judge David Garcia is a major victory for the San Francisco Unified School District, which had refused to abide by the rules of the state's new STAR test, given for the first time this spring. Garcia's one-sentence order did not explain his reasoning. A spokesman for Gov.
NEWS
May 13, 1998 | from Associated Press
The priciest vacant lot in San Francisco, a weedy acre with a Pacific Heights address and a view of the Golden Gate, had a new owner Tuesday. The winner of a high-stakes real estate auction was developer Mitch Menaged, who paid $13.65 million for the 1.1-acre former school site sitting within a block of the homes of the most famous names in San Francisco, including Getty. "It's probably the single remaining best site in one of the best cities in the world," Menaged said.
NEWS
April 3, 1998 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state sued San Francisco's public school district Thursday for its refusal to administer California's new standardized achievement test to students with limited English skills. The lawsuit, filed in San Francisco Superior Court, represents the toughest move yet by State Supt. of Public Instruction Delaine Eastin in demanding that California schools comply with a state requirement that all students in grades 2 through 11 take the test.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1999 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
With soft drink vending machines and fast-food logos sprouting in school hallways, cafeterias and sports arenas, one district has taken an unusual stand against galloping commercialism. Declaring that San Francisco's schoolchildren are not "for sale," the city's school board last month approved a policy to limit commercial advertising and paid endorsements in the city's public schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2003 | John Johnson and Carol Pogash, Special To The Times
This city's reputation as a world-class tourist destination has long stood in opposition to the grimy realities of its City Hall politics and fractured school system. Now, the deaths of two inner-city students on a wilderness outing in the Los Padres National Forest have not only given the school district another black eye, but also thrown into doubt the future of a program meant to give troubled city kids the survival skills to compete with their suburban counterparts.
NEWS
August 26, 1997 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
When urban school superintendents gather to discuss test scores, usually no one has cause to break out the champagne. The reasons--or excuses, as critics would cast it--for big-city schools' below-par performance are serious: They have students mired in poverty and hobbled by language gaps. And they don't have enough qualified teachers or enough money to buy books or upgrade deteriorating campuses.
NEWS
February 29, 1996 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Addressing an unusual controversy over racial preferences, the San Francisco Board of Education revamped the admissions policy at its premier academic high school to eliminate a requirement that held Chinese American students to a higher standard than whites and other racial and ethnic groups.
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