Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSan Gabriel Valley Landmarks
IN THE NEWS

San Gabriel Valley Landmarks

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1994 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
Off a path that meanders through a vast sea of potted plants, some bursting with the smell of citrus, sits a tiny, forgotten cemetery--an island of consecrated tranquillity in the San Gabriel Valley. Hidden from view, surrounded by a commercial nursery, the 118-year-old Fairmount Cemetery, the area's first Protestant graveyard, still survives. It is a remnant of a sometimes violent pioneer past that will soon be surrounded by California's future: development.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1994 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
Off a path that meanders through a vast sea of potted plants, some bursting with the smell of citrus, sits a tiny, forgotten cemetery--an island of consecrated tranquillity in the San Gabriel Valley. Hidden from view, surrounded by a commercial nursery, the 118-year-old Fairmount Cemetery, the area's first Protestant graveyard, still survives. It is a remnant of a sometimes violent pioneer past that will soon be surrounded by California's future: development.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 19, 1993 | AILEEN CHO
"The wonderful thing about being an artist," says Merwin Altfeld, "is that you can move scenery and move mountains." Altfeld, 80, does just that in his current exhibition, "Viewpoint," at the Mountain View Memorial Gallery in Altadena. His 26 mixed-media paintings of Los Angeles and San Gabriel Valley landmarks take "artistic liberties that architects can't," he says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Jae Carmichael, an eclectic artist, writer and independent filmmaker who updated a 19th century cemetery and served as founding director of Pasadena's Pacific Asia Museum, has died. She was 80. Carmichael died Nov. 5 at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena after a long illness, said her cousin, Caitlin Mullin. A painter, sculptor and photographer, Carmichael staged more than 200 solo exhibitions in galleries in Los Angeles, Japan and Europe.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | CRAIG QUINTANA, Times Staff Writer
Some people enjoy them simply for what they are, while some criticize them for lacking aesthetic or artistic value. The diplomatic say they are offbeat. Others sneer that they are nothing if not kitsch. But they definitely elicit a response. While some of the man-made landmarks that dot the San Gabriel Valley are widely known, others go unnoticed by many. Still others are but memories, having disappeared over the years.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|