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San Jacinto Fault

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NEWS
July 27, 1997
Magnitude 3.7 and 3.3 earthquakes, 80 miles apart, struck early Saturday on the San Jacinto fault, the same fault where a moderate 4.9 temblor occurred Friday night. But a Caltech seismologist said it is 95% likely that no larger quake will occur along the San Jacinto--one of Southern California's most active faults--in the immediate future. The 3.7 earthquake hit at the northern end of the San Jacinto fault near San Bernardino at 3:24 a.m., while the 3.3, a 4:53 a.m.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2010 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
As UC Davis physicist and geologist John Rundle ponders the map of recent California earthquakes, he sees visions of a doughnut even Homer J. Simpson wouldn't like. The doughnut is formed by pinpointing the recent quakes near Eureka , Mexicali and Palm Springs. Seismologists call the possible pattern a Mogi doughnut. It's the outgrowth of a concept, developed in Japan, which holds that earthquakes sometimes occur in a circular pattern over decades —building up to one very large quake in the doughnut hole.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2001 | Times Staff Reports
A magnitude 3.9 quake shook much of the Inland Empire Monday and was felt in Orange County, but caused neither damage nor injuries. The U.S. Geological Survey said the 10:13 a.m. temblor was centered on the San Jacinto fault, two miles west of Devore and 12 miles northwest of San Bernardino. The San Jacinto fault is considered one of Southern California's most active. It runs from its junction with the San Andreas fault near the Cajon Pass southeast to the Imperial Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2010 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
There is growing concern among seismologists that the 7.2 Mexicali earthquake on April 4 placed more pressure on faults in Southern California, resulting in increased quake activity over the last three months. The latest evidence of this was Wednesday's magnitude-5.4 Collins Valley earthquake that rolled from the mountains south of Palm Springs, causing no major damage but rattling nerves across the region. Wednesday's quake was centered in the San Jacinto fault zone — Southern California's most active — which runs 100 miles from the border northwesterly toward Riverside and San Bernardino.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A magnitude 4.9 earthquake centered on the San Jacinto fault 10 miles north of the desert town of Borrego Springs rattled a wide swath of Southern California Friday night, but caused no damage or injuries. The 8:14 p.m. quake was felt in San Diego, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Los Angeles counties.
NEWS
June 29, 1997 | From Times Staff Writer
A magnitude 4.2 earthquake near the intersection of the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults hit an area four miles northwest of San Bernardino on Saturday afternoon, and quake scientists declared a low-level precautionary alert. No damage was reported in the 2:45 p.m. temblor, which was followed by several light aftershocks. It was felt in San Bernardino, Colton, Rialto and the San Bernardino Mountain resorts, the San Bernardino County sheriff's office said.
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A cluster of magnitude-3 and -4 earthquakes along the San Jacinto Fault, which runs from the San Bernardino area southeast to the Mexico border, has local seismologists wondering if a much larger quake may be approaching. But although the pattern is unusual, they add, they are not making outright predictions of a major jolt any time soon and see little cause for alarm.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A mild earthquake on Southern California's most active fault rattled desert dwellers but apparently caused no damage or injuries. The jolt measured magnitude 3.3 and was centered 15 miles south of Palm Desert on the San Jacinto Fault Zone, said Robert Finn, spokesman for Caltech's seismological laboratory in Pasadena. A recent report by Caltech and the U.S. Geological Survey said the fault "produces the greatest number of small earthquakes of all the faults in Southern California."
NEWS
May 14, 1993 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Arizona seismologist reports a 130- to 150-year link among strong earthquakes in Southern California, saying that the great 1857 Ft. Tejon temblor on the San Andreas Fault may have sent a pulse of underground strain moving about a mile a year and triggering eight successive quakes along the San Jacinto Fault. Writing in today's issue of Science, Christopher O. Sanders of Arizona State University says the latest quake in the series was a magnitude 6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2001 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Earthquakes of the last two months in Southern California, including a 5.1-magnitude quake centered in Riverside County late Tuesday night, may mark the end of a period of seismic quiescence that followed the 1992 Landers and 1994 Northridge earthquakes, scientists said Wednesday. Tuesday's quake was centered near the town of Anza, 21 miles south of Palm Springs, at 11:56 p.m. and was followed by scores of small aftershocks. Caltech and U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2003 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Geological Survey and Caltrans begin a joint project to delineate earthquake faults along Interstate 215 in San Bernardino today with the first of more than 200 subterranean explosions over the next three weeks. Scientist Rufus Catchings of the Geological Survey said the blasts at depths of 15 feet would be used to generate "a CAT-scan image of the Earth's subsurface in the region" as a means of helping Caltrans design the retrofitting of several freeway bridges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2001 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Earthquakes of the last two months in Southern California, including a 5.1-magnitude quake centered in Riverside County late Tuesday night, may mark the end of a period of seismic quiescence that followed the 1992 Landers and 1994 Northridge earthquakes, scientists said Wednesday. Tuesday's quake was centered near the town of Anza, 21 miles south of Palm Springs, at 11:56 p.m. and was followed by scores of small aftershocks. Caltech and U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2001 | Times Staff Reports
A magnitude 3.9 quake shook much of the Inland Empire Monday and was felt in Orange County, but caused neither damage nor injuries. The U.S. Geological Survey said the 10:13 a.m. temblor was centered on the San Jacinto fault, two miles west of Devore and 12 miles northwest of San Bernardino. The San Jacinto fault is considered one of Southern California's most active. It runs from its junction with the San Andreas fault near the Cajon Pass southeast to the Imperial Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2000 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It will not come as a surprise to many Californians that some parts of the state have a far greater risk of powerful earthquakes than others. But the 1999 seismic shaking hazard maps developed by the California Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, are still striking because they demonstrate how comparatively narrow the bands of maximum danger are.
NEWS
July 27, 1997
Magnitude 3.7 and 3.3 earthquakes, 80 miles apart, struck early Saturday on the San Jacinto fault, the same fault where a moderate 4.9 temblor occurred Friday night. But a Caltech seismologist said it is 95% likely that no larger quake will occur along the San Jacinto--one of Southern California's most active faults--in the immediate future. The 3.7 earthquake hit at the northern end of the San Jacinto fault near San Bernardino at 3:24 a.m., while the 3.3, a 4:53 a.m.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A magnitude 4.9 earthquake centered on the San Jacinto fault 10 miles north of the desert town of Borrego Springs rattled a wide swath of Southern California Friday night, but caused no damage or injuries. The 8:14 p.m. quake was felt in San Diego, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Los Angeles counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2010 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
There is growing concern among seismologists that the 7.2 Mexicali earthquake on April 4 placed more pressure on faults in Southern California, resulting in increased quake activity over the last three months. The latest evidence of this was Wednesday's magnitude-5.4 Collins Valley earthquake that rolled from the mountains south of Palm Springs, causing no major damage but rattling nerves across the region. Wednesday's quake was centered in the San Jacinto fault zone — Southern California's most active — which runs 100 miles from the border northwesterly toward Riverside and San Bernardino.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2003 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Geological Survey and Caltrans begin a joint project to delineate earthquake faults along Interstate 215 in San Bernardino today with the first of more than 200 subterranean explosions over the next three weeks. Scientist Rufus Catchings of the Geological Survey said the blasts at depths of 15 feet would be used to generate "a CAT-scan image of the Earth's subsurface in the region" as a means of helping Caltrans design the retrofitting of several freeway bridges.
NEWS
June 29, 1997 | From Times Staff Writer
A magnitude 4.2 earthquake near the intersection of the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults hit an area four miles northwest of San Bernardino on Saturday afternoon, and quake scientists declared a low-level precautionary alert. No damage was reported in the 2:45 p.m. temblor, which was followed by several light aftershocks. It was felt in San Bernardino, Colton, Rialto and the San Bernardino Mountain resorts, the San Bernardino County sheriff's office said.
NEWS
January 21, 1995 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Scientists taking a more thorough look at the earthquake risks posed by the San Andreas and other large faults in Southern California sharply revised their earlier predictions and said Friday that there is an 86% chance of a very large earthquake in the region during the next 30 years.
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