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San Jacinto River

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NEWS
February 25, 2001 | DEBORAH SULLIVAN BRENNAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a winter morning the San Jacinto River bed is abuzz with the warble of meadow larks and the flash of red-winged blackbirds. This river valley is a relic of California's past, flush with birds, covered by grain fields and dotted with endangered plants exquisitely adapted to its flood-prone soils. "It is the last of the coastal valleys that's not filled with the hustle and bustle of us," said Tony Metcalf, president of the San Bernardino Valley Audubon Society.
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NEWS
February 25, 2001 | DEBORAH SULLIVAN BRENNAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a winter morning the San Jacinto River bed is abuzz with the warble of meadow larks and the flash of red-winged blackbirds. This river valley is a relic of California's past, flush with birds, covered by grain fields and dotted with endangered plants exquisitely adapted to its flood-prone soils. "It is the last of the coastal valleys that's not filled with the hustle and bustle of us," said Tony Metcalf, president of the San Bernardino Valley Audubon Society.
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NEWS
May 20, 1989 | From United Press International
Parts of Houston were swamped by floodwaters up to 10 feet deep Friday after nearly a week of thunderstorms and tornadoes that left at least nine dead in Texas and Oklahoma. Hundreds of southeast Texas residents remained out of their homes, cut off by floodwaters. The rains had stopped, but a flood warning remained in effect for the San Jacinto River around Houston, the Trinity River and area creeks. "It has continued flooding overnight because of runoff. Several areas in and around Houston already have nine to 10 feet of water but most of the floodwaters are receding, except for the San Jacinto and Greens Bayou," said Sgt. John Emerson of the Harris County sheriff's office.
SPORTS
January 13, 1993 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Listen. There is nothing but the sound of birds--all kinds of birds. "As soon as there's water, the birds move right in," said Tom Paulek, manager of the San Jacinto Wildlife Area for the California Department of Fish and Game. "Look at this. It's terrific." Runoff from the raging San Jacinto River has filled adjacent Mystic Lake, which is normally dry farmland. Tony Metcalf, a biologist at UC Riverside, described it as "something to behold . . . awe-inspiring."
SPORTS
January 13, 1993 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Listen. There is nothing but the sound of birds--all kinds of birds. "As soon as there's water, the birds move right in," said Tom Paulek, manager of the San Jacinto Wildlife Area for the California Department of Fish and Game. "Look at this. It's terrific." Runoff from the raging San Jacinto River has filled adjacent Mystic Lake, which is normally dry farmland. Tony Metcalf, a biologist at UC Riverside, described it as "something to behold . . . awe-inspiring."
NEWS
October 22, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Houston Ship Channel, one of America's busiest waterways, was shut down after two more pipelines, adjacent to those that had already burst, ruptured, spilling crude oil into the San Jacinto River. Meanwhile, the toll from the week's South Texas floods rose to at least 17 when a 63-year-old woman was found drowned in the home she had refused to leave in Montgomery County, north of Houston.
NEWS
October 25, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
After days of flood and fire, traffic moved through the Houston Ship Channel and crews said they were ahead of schedule in their efforts to clean up 200,000 gallons of spilled fuel and oil. The channel was closed last week because of flooding caused by torrential rains. It has been reopened since waters began receding and a sunken tugboat was removed from near the mouth of the San Jacinto River.
NEWS
January 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
Heavy rains pounded Alabama on Wednesday, turning streets into rivers and causing flooding that swept a 5-year-old girl to her death, authorities said. Up to 6 inches fell in the southwest part of the state Wednesday, and rain-slicked roads were blamed for three traffic deaths. In Texas, residents coped with the aftermath of rains Tuesday that dumped up to 7 inches on parts of the state. Just northeast of Houston, the San Jacinto River was at 19.
NEWS
July 16, 1988 | JOHN McKINNEY
The San Jacinto range is one of those magical places that lures hikers back year after year. The seasons are more distinct there than most anywhere else in Southern California. Hikers also enjoy the contrasts this range offers--the feeling of hiking in Switzerland while gazing down on the Sahara. Seven Pines Trail ascends the cascading North Fork of San Jacinto River to its headwaters at Deer Springs.
NEWS
October 21, 1994 | From Associated Press
Roiling floodwaters apparently ruptured a 40-inch pipeline Thursday, sending pools of burning gasoline down the rain-swollen San Jacinto River and setting fire to homes and boats on the banks. At least 59 people were treated for minor burns and smoke inhalation. Much of the area had already been evacuated because of days of flooding that have claimed at least 15 lives.
NEWS
May 20, 1989 | From United Press International
Parts of Houston were swamped by floodwaters up to 10 feet deep Friday after nearly a week of thunderstorms and tornadoes that left at least nine dead in Texas and Oklahoma. Hundreds of southeast Texas residents remained out of their homes, cut off by floodwaters. The rains had stopped, but a flood warning remained in effect for the San Jacinto River around Houston, the Trinity River and area creeks. "It has continued flooding overnight because of runoff. Several areas in and around Houston already have nine to 10 feet of water but most of the floodwaters are receding, except for the San Jacinto and Greens Bayou," said Sgt. John Emerson of the Harris County sheriff's office.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | from Associated Press
Gooey crude oil and gasoline, some of it burning, stretched 20 miles down the flood-swollen San Jacinto River, keeping cleanup crews busy Saturday but hopeful of avoiding serious environmental damage. "It's a lot of nasty stuff," said Coast Guard Capt. Richard Ford, coordinator of the cleanup. "I am really hopeful that we will collect a lot of oil there today and we will see a substantial improvement in the next 24 hours.
NEWS
October 21, 1994 | From Associated Press
Two pipelines beneath a roiling river burst Thursday, sending 100-foot flames of burning gasoline snaking more than a mile down the San Jacinto River. At least 69 people were injured. "It looked like hell opened up on the water and the whole river was gasoline," said Mike Norman, who was on the bank trying to retrieve his sailboat when the explosion occurred.
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