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San Jacinto Wildlife Area

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SPORTS
January 13, 1993 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Listen. There is nothing but the sound of birds--all kinds of birds. "As soon as there's water, the birds move right in," said Tom Paulek, manager of the San Jacinto Wildlife Area for the California Department of Fish and Game. "Look at this. It's terrific." Runoff from the raging San Jacinto River has filled adjacent Mystic Lake, which is normally dry farmland. Tony Metcalf, a biologist at UC Riverside, described it as "something to behold . . . awe-inspiring."
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NEWS
February 24, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, Rick VanderKnyff is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition
A chance to trek through the San Jacinto Wildlife Area--with its mosaic of habitats that makes it attractive to a variety of birds and other animals--is being offered Saturday. South Coast Audubon, one of two Orange County chapters of the National Audubon Society, will lead a trip to the Riverside County preserve, which encompasses almost 5,000 acres, including wetlands areas in the process of restoration and rolling hills with grasslands and pristine coastal sage scrub areas.
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NEWS
February 24, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, Rick VanderKnyff is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition
A chance to trek through the San Jacinto Wildlife Area--with its mosaic of habitats that makes it attractive to a variety of birds and other animals--is being offered Saturday. South Coast Audubon, one of two Orange County chapters of the National Audubon Society, will lead a trip to the Riverside County preserve, which encompasses almost 5,000 acres, including wetlands areas in the process of restoration and rolling hills with grasslands and pristine coastal sage scrub areas.
SPORTS
January 13, 1993 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Listen. There is nothing but the sound of birds--all kinds of birds. "As soon as there's water, the birds move right in," said Tom Paulek, manager of the San Jacinto Wildlife Area for the California Department of Fish and Game. "Look at this. It's terrific." Runoff from the raging San Jacinto River has filled adjacent Mystic Lake, which is normally dry farmland. Tony Metcalf, a biologist at UC Riverside, described it as "something to behold . . . awe-inspiring."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1986
The decision of the Department of Fish and Game to turn management of much of the San Jacinto Wildlife Area over to a private hunting club, and to allow put-and-take hunting, is a perversion of the purpose of California's wildlife areas. Instead of saving tax dollars as advertised, the program threatens the wildlife that the area is designed to protect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1989 | STEVEN R. CHURM, Times Staff Writer
Standing on a low mound not far from the water's edge, Frank Robinson looked Wednesday across the marshy expanse of Upper Newport Bay and smiled. "It's a fabulous program," Robinson, a longtime crusader for preservation of the bay, finally said. "It's going to make it that much harder for this delicate setting ever to be destroyed." Protecting the 752 acres of wildlife habitat in Upper Newport Bay has long been a mission for Robinson and other county environmentalists. That's why they view the area's inclusion in the newly created California Wildlands Program as a big step forward.
NEWS
December 27, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They're the only park rangers who ride a tram to work. It's either take the Palms Springs Aerial Tramway or hike eight miles to their ranger station. There are no roads and no vehicles are allowed in the wilderness. Jerry Frates and Eric Hanson are stationed at Long Valley Ranger Station, elevation 8,400 feet, on the eastern slopes of Mt. San Jacinto above Palm Springs. It's the highest ranger station in the state. "I have been a ranger 12 years in several different state parks.
NEWS
October 8, 1988 | ROB WATERS, Times Staff Writer
You might call it a desert island. San Jacinto Peak, 10,804 feet high, is a cool oasis of alpine forests, meadows and bubbling streams surrounded by the desert. It is, arguably, the best mountain in Southern California. Barren and rugged in some spots, lush and gentle in others, San Jacinto's extremes are matched by few peaks anywhere. It is a wild place--more than 40 square miles at the top are designated wilderness--but remarkably accessible.
NEWS
November 8, 2005 | Scott Doggett
WATERFOWL hunters have had less success in Southern California since the season opened last month, except at the San Jacinto Wildlife Area in Riverside County, where the daily take per hunter has steadily increased. Geese and duck season in the Southland runs from Oct. 22 to Jan. 29. Youth hunting days, for hunters younger than 16, extends beyond the regular season to include the weekend of Feb. 4 and 5.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | Associated Press
State fish and game officials, in an effort to increase revenue and draw more visitors to state wildlife reserves, unveiled a plan Wednesday to charge a $2 admission fee at nine state-owned reserves and use the money to finance guided tours, trails and facilities for visitors.
NEWS
December 27, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They're the only park rangers who ride a tram to work. It's either take the Palms Springs Aerial Tramway or hike eight miles to their ranger station. There are no roads and no vehicles are allowed in the wilderness. Jerry Frates and Eric Hanson are stationed at Long Valley Ranger Station, elevation 8,400 feet, on the eastern slopes of Mt. San Jacinto above Palm Springs. It's the highest ranger station in the state. "I have been a ranger 12 years in several different state parks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1989 | STEVEN R. CHURM, Times Staff Writer
Standing on a low mound not far from the water's edge, Frank Robinson looked Wednesday across the marshy expanse of Upper Newport Bay and smiled. "It's a fabulous program," Robinson, a longtime crusader for preservation of the bay, finally said. "It's going to make it that much harder for this delicate setting ever to be destroyed." Protecting the 752 acres of wildlife habitat in Upper Newport Bay has long been a mission for Robinson and other county environmentalists. That's why they view the area's inclusion in the newly created California Wildlands Program as a big step forward.
NEWS
October 8, 1988 | ROB WATERS, Times Staff Writer
You might call it a desert island. San Jacinto Peak, 10,804 feet high, is a cool oasis of alpine forests, meadows and bubbling streams surrounded by the desert. It is, arguably, the best mountain in Southern California. Barren and rugged in some spots, lush and gentle in others, San Jacinto's extremes are matched by few peaks anywhere. It is a wild place--more than 40 square miles at the top are designated wilderness--but remarkably accessible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1986
The decision of the Department of Fish and Game to turn management of much of the San Jacinto Wildlife Area over to a private hunting club, and to allow put-and-take hunting, is a perversion of the purpose of California's wildlife areas. Instead of saving tax dollars as advertised, the program threatens the wildlife that the area is designed to protect.
NEWS
March 22, 1992 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To its advocates, the $2-billion proposed mega-development known as Moreno Highlands is just what this swiftly growing community needs: an orderly mix of residential, commercial and park projects that also manages to preserve the desert environment--and create thousands of jobs. "It has all of the amenities that a person living there could ask for," Councilwoman Judy Nieburger said.
NEWS
June 30, 1986 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
A state Department of Fish and Game proposal to turn management of much of the sprawling San Jacinto Wildlife Area over to a private hunt club is drawing fire from environmentalists who say the idea poses a threat to native birds and mammals. In exchange for managing a major part of the wildlife area, the club would be permitted to run a public bird-hunting program on the land.
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