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San Joaquin Hill Tollway

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1998 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kevin Jellison got some unexpected change when he pulled into the toll plaza Saturday morning along the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor. The 24-year-old Lake Forest resident was ready to pay the normal $2 toll, but he got $1 back thanks to a new promotion that cuts in half the cost of using the road for three consecutive weekends. The promotion is part of an effort by the Transportation Corridor Agencies to boost sagging ridership on the toll road, which is running below projections.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2011 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
Drivers on the San Joaquin Hills toll road through western Orange County could be paying tolls for an extra six years under a proposed agreement that would restructure about $430 million of its $2.1 billion in debt. The agreement is asking bondholders to lower payments for 13 years and restructure the way the agency pays interest on certain bonds. An agreement, which would push back the bond maturity dates by six years, to 2042, is expected in two weeks. "Basically … what we're trying to do is be proactive about the way we manage finances here at the agency," said Tom Margro, chief executive of the Transportation Corridor Agencies, which also operates the Foothill and Eastern toll roads, which includes a portion of the 133 Freeway.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1991
Congratulations to staff writers Eric Bailey and Jeffrey Perlman on their stories about the proposed San Joaquin Hills tollway (Feb. 10). The tollway is a billion-dollar boondoggle designed not to relieve present unbearable traffic congestion but to facilitate further overdevelopment of south Orange County by two marauding giants, the Irvine and Mission Viejo companies. The key piece of information provided by The Times is this: "Along the San Joaquin Hills route alone, 105,000 new homes are expected, as well as 54.7 million square feet of industrial and commercial development."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1998 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kevin Jellison got some unexpected change when he pulled into the toll plaza Saturday morning along the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor. The 24-year-old Lake Forest resident was ready to pay the normal $2 toll, but he got $1 back thanks to a new promotion that cuts in half the cost of using the road for three consecutive weekends. The promotion is part of an effort by the Transportation Corridor Agencies to boost sagging ridership on the toll road, which is running below projections.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1997 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bursts of industrial and retail construction, coupled with continuing growth in the office market, should give Orange County's commercial development industry its best year in nearly a decade, a major commercial real estate firm said Thursday. In a forecast for the coming year, market specialists for Grubb & Ellis Co.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1993 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Fashioning a compromise on the sale of UC Irvine land for the San Joaquin Hills tollway, a judge Wednesday ordered additional environmental study but restricted its scope to only 1.7 acres now part of a campus ecological reserve. Orange County Superior Court Judge James L. Smith rejected a bid by tollway opponents to have the study look at the road's impact on the future of UC Irvine, including acreage to be sold for tollway use that is now vacant but outside the ecological reserve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1991 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to a judge's order, promoters of the San Joaquin Hills tollway on Thursday took a second look at the highway's expected environmental effects and decided they liked what they saw, voting to reaffirm their support for the 15-mile road. The unanimous decision by the Transportation Corridor Agencies board came despite the pleas of opponents challenging the $778-million project in court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1991 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge on Wednesday ordered authorities to review new air quality and wetlands studies of the San Joaquin Hills tollway before starting construction along the $778-million highway. Tollway boosters were optimistic that the decision would not disrupt plans to begin construction early next year, while opponents said they hope that the ruling will prove a formidable setback. Orange County Superior Court Judge James P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1993 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Years ago, when Pelican Hill Road was merely a line of broken dashes on a road map, the idea of paving it incensed some environmentalists because it represented the first blemish on the last undeveloped coastal land in Orange County. Now completed and renamed Newport Coast Drive, this 6 1/3-mile-long, county-owned highway that gently winds through rolling hills and newly developed landscape is once again catapulted into a heated debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1995 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest legal zigzag over the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday that construction may continue, lifting its own earlier ban on the work. "This is wonderful news," said Lisa Telles, spokeswoman for the Transportation Corridor Agencies. "I can tell you that the plan right now is to look at the decision (today) and, with the rain, see what we can do. Obviously, with the rain you can't do a lot of work. Once it dries up, we will start working."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1997 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Running late for an afternoon business appointment in Mission Viejo, Joseph Roth glanced anxiously at his watch and braced himself for the inevitable sea of brake lights at the dreaded El Toro Y. "I thought I was dead in the water as far as making my appointment," the Anaheim resident recalled recently as he stopped for gas. "Then I drove through the Y without even touching my brakes once. It was weird, it was kind of like the 'Twilight Zone.'
BUSINESS
January 10, 1997 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bursts of industrial and retail construction, coupled with continuing growth in the office market, should give Orange County's commercial development industry its best year in nearly a decade, a major commercial real estate firm said Thursday. In a forecast for the coming year, market specialists for Grubb & Ellis Co.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning Wednesday, rush-hour commuters traveling between Laguna Niguel and Laguna Canyon Road should be able to make that stretch in less than seven minutes compared with the usual 35. With the first seven-mile stretch of the new San Joaquin Hills tollway opening, transportation officials say, this alternative route to the San Diego Freeway should be a snap.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1995 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest legal zigzag over the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday that construction may continue, lifting its own earlier ban on the work. "This is wonderful news," said Lisa Telles, spokeswoman for the Transportation Corridor Agencies. "I can tell you that the plan right now is to look at the decision (today) and, with the rain, see what we can do. Obviously, with the rain you can't do a lot of work. Once it dries up, we will start working."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1994 | HOLLY J. WAGNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A group of Newport Beach and Laguna Beach residents has sued the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency to block the conversion of a 1.4-mile section of Newport Coast Drive to a tollway. In a lawsuit filed Thursday in Orange County Superior Court, the Newport Coast Drive Defense Fund alleges that the agency has no authority to impose a 50-cent toll on a road being paid for with property taxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Environmental activists who had considered taking legal action instead conceded Tuesday that the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Agency is not violating a judge's order by resuming work here on a segment of a controversial toll road project. "We've got people with cameras out there photographing the site and running to the nearest Fotomat," said Robert King, a spokesman for the environmental group Save Our San Juan, also known as SOS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Environmental activists who had considered taking legal action instead conceded Tuesday that the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Agency is not violating a judge's order by resuming work here on a segment of a controversial toll road project. "We've got people with cameras out there photographing the site and running to the nearest Fotomat," said Robert King, a spokesman for the environmental group Save Our San Juan, also known as SOS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1993 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
The agency overseeing Orange County's embattled San Joaquin Hills tollway project hopes to sell $1.1 billion in tax-exempt revenue bonds next week in the county's biggest-ever financing of a public works project. Officials at the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency said the bond sale will allow it to tell the contractor, California Corridor Constructors, to begin work by the end of March.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1994 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight Earth First! activists arrested last year for chaining themselves to bulldozers about to begin construction of the San Joaquin Hills tollway have promised not to do it again in exchange for a penalty limited to 10 days of community service and informal probation. According to the plea agreement reached Monday, one day before the case was to go to trial, the activists pleaded no contest to charges of trespassing and failing to disperse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1993 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Fashioning a compromise on the sale of UC Irvine land for the San Joaquin Hills tollway, a judge Wednesday ordered additional environmental study but restricted its scope to only 1.7 acres now part of a campus ecological reserve. Orange County Superior Court Judge James L. Smith rejected a bid by tollway opponents to have the study look at the road's impact on the future of UC Irvine, including acreage to be sold for tollway use that is now vacant but outside the ecological reserve.
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