Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSan Joaquin Hills Corridor
IN THE NEWS

San Joaquin Hills Corridor

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1994 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Buoyed by hope that the county's financial woes could waylay plans for a toll road through Laguna Canyon, San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor opponents will continue protesting the project with a candlelight vigil here Friday. Although tollway builders say the road is not threatened by the fiscal crisis, some foes believe that Orange County's bankruptcy will make it harder--if not impossible--to finance the project.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2004 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
About $1.9 billion in bonds sold to finance the San Joaquin Hills tollway might be downgraded to junk status if nothing is done to prevent the failing west Orange County turnpike from sliding into default, a Wall Street ratings agency warned Tuesday. Moody's Investors Service notified the Transportation Corridor Agencies in Irvine that it would reconsider the San Joaquin's Baa3 rating, which is Moody's lowest investment grade. A decision could be made within 90 days.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1992 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Environmentalists opposed to the controversial San Joaquin Hills tollway were biding their time, waiting for the right moment to take their case against the 15-mile, $793-million project before a federal judge. But tollway officials, seeking to derail their longtime nemeses and speed construction, have hit upon an unusual but not unprecedented tactic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2004 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
With continued concerns about financial risks, directors of Orange County's toll road authority Thursday delayed for the second time in two weeks voting on a complicated plan to save the failing San Joaquin Hills tollway. The issue before the Transportation Corridor Agencies is whether to merge the operations of the San Joaquin Hills and the successful Foothill-Eastern tollways and refinance their combined debt with a massive $4-billion bond issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1992
It's time the people see the reality that any tollway in this area is ridiculous. To say that more expressways will ease the smog problem is naive. More cars, more houses, and more people just doesn't solve the problem; it doesn't work. We have to stop the construction companies now. Eventually our public parks and greenbelts are going to become quasi-zoos, where there will be specified areas to hike, picnic and socialize within the smog and noise. Cutting through our beautiful hills where people can enjoy nature and solitude is a crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1988
In today's mail came an announcement. The Orange County Environmental Management Agency (EMA) announced public meetings in Irvine and Laguna Hills to "seek comments on the San Joaquin Hills Corridor." The EMA is owed thanks for involving the public in this road project. It is the democratic way. But it's not the democratic way if the EMA again appears to employ tricks designed to fool the public. This road project seems to have been fraught with fraud and deceit since its beginning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1993
I was alarmed when I read the article, "Tollway Agency-Caltrans Proposal Draws Protest" (Dec. 20) and learned that a no-competition agreement between Caltrans and the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency (TCA) was being negotiated without a public hearing. The proposed agreement is locking in the current transportation plans for roads surrounding the proposed toll road for the next 30 years! Locking in the current plans assumes that we can accurately predict our needs for 30 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1991 | STAN OFTELIE, Stan Oftelie is executive director of the Orange County Transportation Commission
Three baseball seasons ago, people were whispering the words that only Kevin Costner could hear in the hit movie "Field of Dreams": "If you build it, they will come." The catch phrase caught on, became a cliche, then drifted into oblivion. But now it's back. As public hearings begin this week on the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor, residents are applying "Field of Dreams" logic to transportation facilities and new housing: "If you build it, they will come."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1991
The head of the Orange County Transportation Commission, Stan Oftelie, suggests that people equate the San Joaquin Hills Corridor with "Field of Dreams": "Build the road or not, the people will come" (Commentary, "Tollways Juggernaut: Is It the Right Road for Public Travel," Feb. 10). Some movie buffs see a much closer link to the corridors with "The Godfather"--Parts I, II and III. It seems our powerful Don (Bren) made the county an offer it couldn't refuse. Reflect on the people who have resisted the will of our godfathers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1993
Profs. (Joie Pierce) Jones and (Richard E.) MacMillen left out several key facts in their opinion article Feb. 15 ("Academics, Industry a Costly Blend") attacking the decision of the UC regents to sell 25 acres of UC Irvine land for San Joaquin Hills Corridor right of way. First, UCI's own master plan acknowledges that the corridor must be built if the campus is to grow to serve future students and accommodate a campus research park that will produce revenues for the university system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2002 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The financial picture for the struggling San Joaquin Hills toll road in west Orange County worsened Tuesday, when a major Wall Street ratings agency downgraded more than $1 billion in bonds to junk status because traffic and revenue continue to fall short of projections. Citing higher potential risks for investors, New York-based Fitch IBCA lowered the rating for more than half of the tollway's $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1998 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kevin Jellison got some unexpected change when he pulled into the toll plaza Saturday morning along the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor. The 24-year-old Lake Forest resident was ready to pay the normal $2 toll, but he got $1 back thanks to a new promotion that cuts in half the cost of using the road for three consecutive weekends. The promotion is part of an effort by the Transportation Corridor Agencies to boost sagging ridership on the toll road, which is running below projections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Capping years of controversy, transportation officials on Wednesday opened the gates to Orange County's newest toll road--the first segment of the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor. "This is a monumental effort and a critical link in Orange County's transportation future," county Supervisor Marian Bergeson told about 600 dignitaries and officials gathered at the tollway's La Paz Road entrance for the opening ceremony. "It will help solve the crisis of gridlock in Orange County."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1995
Your [Nov. 26] expose on the outrageous salaries, benefits and perks that the Transportation Corridor Agencies pays itself was a great piece of reporting. In fact, as we read the piece, it sounded quite similar to the reporting done by The Times on the Santa Margarita Water District. How about a follow-up article on how the taxpayers of California are subsidizing the toll roads with Mello-Roos funds, the fact that if the toll roads aren't self-supporting the taxpayer will pick up the slack, and that as soon as they are in operation Caltrans (the taxpayer again)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1995
I'm so mad, I am almost ready to go down to Laguna Canyon and get arrested again. It is absurd that the people protesting in the canyon are being accused of wasting county money! I went there to point out, and hopefully encourage others to speak out, about what should be the priorities at this time of financial crisis in Orange County. The toll road is the waste of money! It is unconscionable that one dime is being used to continue with a project that will benefit so few. That road is merely an on-off ramp through one of the wealthiest areas in the county to save a few people a few minutes of driving time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1994 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Buoyed by hope that the county's financial woes could waylay plans for a toll road through Laguna Canyon, San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor opponents will continue protesting the project with a candlelight vigil here Friday. Although tollway builders say the road is not threatened by the fiscal crisis, some foes believe that Orange County's bankruptcy will make it harder--if not impossible--to finance the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1989
I am a 78-year-old retired schoolteacher who has lived in Laguna Canyon in the unincorporated County of Orange for 30 years. We have sought annexation to the city of Laguna Beach because the Health Department no longer allows septic tanks in the flood plain and the percolation tests are so stringent that the hillside residents cannot build. We have no sewers. The city of Laguna Beach has agreed that if we annex, they will help us financially to get the sewer. This makes it possible for people on a fixed income (like myself)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1989
Carl Schiermeyer in his Commentary (Jan. 15) produced some interesting data regarding existing rail transportation through Orange County. Building more sections of double track is a must and upgrading maintenance on the rolling stock mandatory, but these measures are mere Band-Aids on an already crisis transit situation. This is not to say that these measures should not be pursued immediately but that additional rail corridors should be on the drawing boards now. The San Joaquin Freeway, which is estimated to cost $409 million, a portion of which is to come from user fees in the form of tolls, can only exacerbate our transportation woes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1994 | ELAINE TASSY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Qudsia Roston opened her Montessori school here 22 years ago, she planned to never leave. But now, Roston, her students, and the resident horse, rabbit and bird may be forced to move. The school on Rancho Viejo Road that for so long has been trafficked by children must make way for cars--actually, a toll road called the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1993 | RICHARD CORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bulldozers will start carving the path of the San Joaquin Hills tollway this morning, officials said, about 20 years after the project was proposed to move traffic through South County. Mike Stockstill, spokesman for the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency, said Wednesday that two bulldozers and other heavy equipment would start work near Greenfield Drive, in the southern portion of the proposed 17.5-mile corridor.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|