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San Joaquin Hills Tollway

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1994
Eight Earth First! activists arrested last year for chaining themselves to bulldozers about to begin construction of the San Joaquin Hills tollway will not have pay restitution for lost income and expenses associated with their actions, a group spokesman said. Patrick T. Mitchell said Commissioner Kenneth Schwartz announced his decision Monday in South Orange County Municipal Court. Mitchell, 27, was arrested with seven other environmental activists Sept.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1997
Re "Tollway Intimidation Not a Solution," Orange County Voices, Dec. 29: Is Paul J. Pitt referring to the same San Joaquin Hills tollway that I use? The one that has just opened? I believe we can't be talking about the same tollway! Here is how the system really works, not [as] loosely described by Pitt. Immediately after the tollway opened, my father received a notice he had violated tollway payment policy and owed $152. The notice provided an 800-phone service number to call with questions or problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2004 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
An Orange County transportation leader who advanced the use of bond issues and public-private partnerships to finance new highways announced Monday that he will retire as chief executive of the largest toll road system in California. After 15 years with the Irvine-based Transportation Corridor Agencies, Walter D. Kreutzen said he will step down Nov. 1 to pursue other professional endeavors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1991 | TOM McQUEENEY
The Chamber of Commerce has endorsed the proposed San Joaquin Hills tollway as a necessary link in the county's highway system. Growing gridlock is keeping qualified workers out of Orange County and hurting local businesses, Irvine Chamber of Commerce President Stan Wolcott said in a statement. Since the corridor has been on the books for years and many businesses moved into the area assuming it would be built, construction of the roadway should commence as soon as possible, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1992
Construction of the proposed San Joaquin Hills tollway will result in the creation of a literal "concrete jungle" whose syndrome has spread in epidemic quantities throughout Orange County in recent decades. The current tollway proposal will continue the pattern of the demolition of the environment as well as natural habitats for animals and replacing them with monstrous freeway developments. Immediate examples of destruction include the imminent obliteration of the gnatcatcher population in the canyon and increased congestion to the residents of the Laguna Beach area, not to mention the depletion of one of Orange County's last remaining natural havens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Construction for another onramp and offramp for the San Joaquin Hills tollway will begin today, officials said. The interchange, at Glenwood and Pacific Park drives, is expected to be completed in November 2002 and will give commuters more direct access to the city's business district, Councilman Greg Ficke said. Commuters now have to use El Toro Road or Aliso Creek Road to enter or exit the tollway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2004 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
A second Wall Street financial agency on Monday withdrew its investment ratings for a proposed $3.9-billion bond deal that is designed to keep Orange County's failing San Joaquin Hills toll road out of default.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1991 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joining the chorus of government agencies voicing serious concerns about the planned San Joaquin Hills tollway, U.S. Interior Department officials said the project's key environmental document fails to protect wildlife resources and doesn't note that a critically endangered bird has been seen in its path.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1993
If the San Joaquin Hills tollway were before various planning approval agencies today, would it be considered necessary? Would it take the planned route it has, and at the same size? Would it be approved at all? The strong official political support for the road suggests that the current Board of Supervisors likely would approve the road, even as its predecessors did in the 1970s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2004 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
A search for alternative ways to save the failing San Joaquin Hills tollway crumbed Wednesday evening when the bond insurance company for Orange County's toll road authority announced it would back only a proposed merger of highway operations and a $4-billion bond deal. During a six-hour committee meeting at the Transportation Corridor Agencies in Irvine, officials for MBIA Inc.
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