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San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1994 | ELAINE TASSY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Qudsia Roston opened her Montessori school here 22 years ago, she planned to never leave. But now, Roston, her students, and the resident horse, rabbit and bird may be forced to move. The school on Rancho Viejo Road that for so long has been trafficked by children must make way for cars--actually, a toll road called the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2005 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
After almost 18 months of secret negotiations, board members of Orange County's toll road system on Thursday unveiled a $1.16-billion package of loans and payments to bail out the financially struggling San Joaquin Hills tollway. The proposed rescue plan by the Transportation Corridor Agencies is an alternative to the failed attempt in May 2004 to merge the operations of the Foothill-Eastern and San Joaquin Hills toll roads and refinance them with a $4-billion bond issue.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1993
The three tollways that would run through eastern and southern Orange County will cost more than $2 billion, and all should be open by the year 2000. Tolls will vary by vehicle. Here's where each project stands now: * Eastern Transportation Corridor: Neither grading nor construction work has begun. * Foothill Transportation Corridor: A 3-mile stretch of the road near Lake Forest is set to open later this year. A second stretch is scheduled to open in 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2004 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
Tolls on the financially ailing San Joaquin Hills turnpike in coastal Orange County will increase anywhere from 25 to 50 cents on July 1 -- a rate hike that goes beyond what highway operators had planned for at most of the road's toll plazas. The San Joaquin Hills board of directors voted 13 to 1 on Thursday to approve the rate hikes, which are expected to generate $1.5 million a year in additional revenue for the struggling highway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1991 | WENDY PAULSON
A public hearing on proposed alignments for the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor is scheduled for the City Council meeting Wednesday. At the request of several citizens, the City Council recently voted 5 to 0 to schedule the hearing to precede a March 14 public hearing by directors of the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency. The city's hearing is aimed to get community input on the San Joaquin Hills corridor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1999 | Chris Ceballos, (949) 248-2150
Residents soon will be able to find the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor on city maps. The addition of the toll road was part of the changes the City Council recently approved to the city's traffic and circulation maps. The council had postponed making changes to city maps in January to allow a traffic count on rural streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1993 | BOB ELSTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Saying he would ask the state attorney general to investigate, Assemblyman Gil Ferguson (R-Newport Beach) said Wednesday that he is not convinced it is legal to incorporate a stretch of Newport Coast Drive into the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor. Ferguson acknowledged that he has no assurance that the attorney general will honor his request for an investigation into what amounts to "taking a public road and putting a toll on it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1996 | JOHN POPE
Providing an early glimpse of what will soon be a familiar sight for thousands of Orange County commuters, the first of 26 tollbooths for the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor was installed near Aliso Creek Road on Wednesday. The 15-mile tollway linking San Juan Capistrano and Newport Beach is set for completion in December. The first section, a four-mile stretch between Moulton Parkway and Laguna Canyon Road, is to open in July.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1995 | HOLLY J. WAGNER
The City Council has decided not to join a lawsuit that seeks to block the conversion of a section of Newport Coast Drive to a toll road. Though council members said they oppose the conversion, they voted unanimously to stay out of the legal fray. The county's Transportation Corridor Agencies plans to renovate a strip of Newport Coast Drive and incorporate it into the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1993 | RICHARD CORE
Representatives of agencies involved in building the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor will meet with residents Wednesday to discuss the project. The meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. in the City Council chambers at 25201 Paseo de Alicia, Suite 150. "It will be more of an informational meeting so people who live near the corridor aren't surprised one morning when they get up and they hear a tractor out there," said Don White, the city's director of administrative services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2002 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The financial picture for the struggling San Joaquin Hills toll road in west Orange County worsened Tuesday, when a major Wall Street ratings agency downgraded more than $1 billion in bonds to junk status because traffic and revenue continue to fall short of projections. Citing higher potential risks for investors, New York-based Fitch IBCA lowered the rating for more than half of the tollway's $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1999 | Chris Ceballos, (949) 248-2150
Residents soon will be able to find the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor on city maps. The addition of the toll road was part of the changes the City Council recently approved to the city's traffic and circulation maps. The council had postponed making changes to city maps in January to allow a traffic count on rural streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1998 | DAVID HALDANE
A proposed toll increase on the San Joaquin Hills toll road will be delayed until road improvements are done. The toll road's operations committee approved the 25-cent increase in concept on Tuesday but postponed its implementation. "To introduce a toll increase at the same time that we're taking care of asphalt is not customer friendly," spokesman Paul Glaab said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1998 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kevin Jellison got some unexpected change when he pulled into the toll plaza Saturday morning along the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor. The 24-year-old Lake Forest resident was ready to pay the normal $2 toll, but he got $1 back thanks to a new promotion that cuts in half the cost of using the road for three consecutive weekends. The promotion is part of an effort by the Transportation Corridor Agencies to boost sagging ridership on the toll road, which is running below projections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1998 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state will spend $2 million to put a grainier surface on the San Joaquin Hills toll road to improve safety, though county transportation officials are blaming a rash of rain-related accidents on lead-foot drivers, not road conditions. The state will pour a one-inch-thick asphalt overlay over 10 miles of the hilly road's 15-mile length before next winter's rainy season, Rose Orem, a Caltrans spokeswoman, said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1998 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The El Nino storms that destroyed property and devastated lives don't seem to have derailed the plans of some local contractors. Despite the bad weather, they expect to complete the toll road from Anaheim Hills to Irvine 14 months early. "This is great news for everybody," said Lisa Telles, a spokeswoman for the Transportation Corridor Agencies, which is building two toll roads in South County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1993 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
After years of turmoil, construction on Orange County's most controversial highway--the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor--is likely to begin this Saturday, officials said. The announcement by tollway officials drew an immediate protest from Joel Reynolds, attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council, a national environmental group that has sued to block construction of the 17.5-mile toll road between Newport Beach and San Juan Capistrano, parallel to Interstate 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1996 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the first stretch of the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor opens next month from here to San Juan Capistrano, the route will be quicker and more convenient--but it won't be free. Although it's a tradition that motorists on a new tollway are permitted to sample the road for free, Orange County officials say it just won't work in this case because the seven-mile stretch will draw too much traffic and clog several major intersections.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1997 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Orange County is undergoing an unprecedented housing and business boom, fueled in large part by the controversial network of toll roads now being built. New housing tracts are rising up in picturesque hills and valleys, bulldozers and earthmovers are breaking ground for office buildings and hotels, and signs advertise new retail space for lease.
NEWS
September 28, 1997 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Orange County is undergoing an unprecedented housing and business boom fueled in large part by the controversial network of toll roads now being built. New housing tracts are rising up in picturesque hills and valleys, as bulldozers and earthmovers break ground for office buildings and hotels and signs advertise new retail space for lease.
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