Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSan Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency
IN THE NEWS

San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1996
An Orange County Superior Court judge ruled Friday that the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency complied with state law when it included a section of Newport Coast Drive into the 15-mile toll road. The judge ruled that state law gave the agency enough authority to include Newport Coast Road as part of the toll corridor. The San Joaquin Hills Corridor's first 7-mile segment was opened to traffic July 24.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1998 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerned that its attorney had settled every lawsuit challenging developer fees for storage facilities by returning hundreds of thousands of dollars, the toll road board on Thursday set up a committee to oversee future settlements. "We've had a history of settling these cases," said Todd Spitzer, a member of the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency board of directors and a county supervisor. "This has sent the wrong message to the community.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1995
The city has filed a lawsuit against the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency demanding $675,000 for damage that occurred during the January floods. The damage, the suit maintains, resulted from soil erosion caused by the agency's grading near Laguna Canyon Road in preparation for a toll road. The erosion "was significant," said Philip D. Kohn, a Costa Mesa attorney who filed the lawsuit in Orange County Superior Court on Wednesday. "We had to go in there and clean it all out."
NEWS
September 4, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Traffic on the San Joaquin Hills toll road is running about 43% behind projections, prompting operators to consider a reduction in the $2 charge during weekends and evenings to entice more drivers to the road. A ridership study released this week says the road will not draw as many cars as was predicted in 1992, when those projections were used to sell $1.4 billion in construction bonds. The bonds were sold in anticipation of 94,500 vehicle trips per day by April 1997.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1994 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The clamor of pile drivers working on the San Joaquin Hills toll road is undermining the mental health of patients at a nearby psychiatric hospital, according to a lawsuit filed Friday. "The patients . . . are undergoing treatment for substance abuse, chemical dependency, depression, schizophrenia and other illnesses," according to the lawsuit filed by Community Psychiatric Centers against the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1995 | FRANK MESSINA
After almost a dozen meetings with city officials and residents in recent weeks, officials of the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency at tonight's City Council meeting will outline their solutions to problems caused by construction of the San Joaquin Hills tollway. Transportation officials have given the city a list of alternative construction solutions in two areas affected by toll-road work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1992 | TOM McQUEENEY
The Planning Commission voted last week to encourage the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency to preserve the former Buffalo Ranch site at the corner of MacArthur Boulevard and Ford Road. The 1950s tourist attraction became historically important when master planner William L. Pereira set up offices in the ranch-like structures while designing the UC Irvine campus, the future city of Irvine and Newport Center in the early 1960s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1992 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN
In a preemptive strike, an Orange County agency sued environmentalists in federal court Monday to pave the way for quick construction of the San Joaquin Hills tollway. The strategy, aimed at speeding a court decision that otherwise might take a year or more, was immediately blasted as an attempt to "break" environmentalists financially. "Obviously, it's an attempt to crush your opposition," said Norm Grossman, a board member of Laguna Greenbelt Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1990 | BILL BILLITER
The boards governing three proposed toll roads in Orange County voted Thursday to pursue what they see as a streamlined approach in constructing two of the tollways. The so-called "design/build" approach, according to the staff of the tollways boards, could result in lower costs and quicker completion of the highways. The concept calls for having one overall contractor handle most of the design work and then immediately proceed to construction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1991 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN
Despite growing opposition from homeowners, the Orange County Transportation Commission on Monday stood behind a controversial environmental impact report for the San Joaquin Hills tollway. At the urging of Orange County Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder, the commission also will use Washington lobbyist James McConnell to counter the Environmental Protection Agency's criticism of the EIR.
NEWS
June 13, 1997 | JANET WILSON and DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Seeking to boost sluggish ridership, operators of the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor will spend $4 million on a marketing plan that may offer riders free ice cream, hamburgers and coffee if they'll only take the tollway. The efforts are part of a perky advertising campaign designed to counteract the reality that the roadway is attracting far fewer drivers than expected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1997 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Accusing her agency of "not acting legally or appropriately" in its planned discussions about a $1.2-billion bond refunding, a director of the county's newest toll-road authority has asked her colleagues to rethink how they do business. Irvine Mayor Christina L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1997 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The directors of Orange County's newest toll road held a closed meeting to discuss plans to refinance $1.2 billion worth of bonds. In addition, following a practice rare among Orange County public entities, the 12 members of the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency's board of directors were asked to sign statements promising not to talk about the May 8 discussions. Half of them signed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1996
An Orange County Superior Court judge ruled Friday that the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency complied with state law when it included a section of Newport Coast Drive into the 15-mile toll road. The judge ruled that state law gave the agency enough authority to include Newport Coast Road as part of the toll corridor. The San Joaquin Hills Corridor's first 7-mile segment was opened to traffic July 24.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1995 | DAVID REYES and LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Cost of Communting (BEGIN TEXT OF INFOBOX / INFOGRAPHIC) Cost of Communting Tolls for the new 91 Express Lanes range from 25 cents to $2.50 Eastbound Toll Schedule Wed., 7:00 a.m.: 25 Wed., 11: 00 a.m.: 50Fri., 1: 00 p.m.: $1.00 Wed., 2:00 p.m.: $1.00 Fri., 2:00 p.m.: $1.50 Wed., 3.00 p.m.: $1.50 Wed., 5.00 p.m.: $2.50 Wed., 7:00 p.m.: $1.50 Wed., 8:00 p.m.: $1.00 Fri., 8:00 p.m.: $1.50 Wed., 9:00 p.m.: 50 Fri., 9:00 p.m.: $1.00 Wed., 10:00 p.m.: 25 * Westbound Toll Schedule Wed., 4:00 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1995 | FRANK MESSINA
After almost a dozen meetings with city officials and residents in recent weeks, officials of the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency at tonight's City Council meeting will outline their solutions to problems caused by construction of the San Joaquin Hills tollway. Transportation officials have given the city a list of alternative construction solutions in two areas affected by toll-road work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1989 | JAMES M. GOMEZ
In one of their first official acts as a public body, Laguna Niguel officials agreed Tuesday to join a panel that is planning a tollway connecting Newport Beach to southern Mission Viejo. Members of the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency met with city officials before their first regular council meeting to describe the design of the transportation corridor and to discuss the status of the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1992 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defying a hostile faculty resolution, the UC Board of Regents on Thursday approved the sale of 25.2 acres of land on the UC Irvine campus to the agency building a controversial $1-billion toll road. Some of the land is within an ecological reserve, but UC Irvine officials said that both campus and county growth plans recognized the tollway's path in official planning documents years ago. The San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency's offer of $10.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1995
The city has filed a lawsuit against the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency demanding $675,000 for damage that occurred during the January floods. The damage, the suit maintains, resulted from soil erosion caused by the agency's grading near Laguna Canyon Road in preparation for a toll road. The erosion "was significant," said Philip D. Kohn, a Costa Mesa attorney who filed the lawsuit in Orange County Superior Court on Wednesday. "We had to go in there and clean it all out."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|