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San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency Finances

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO
The agency operating the San Joaquin Hills toll road approved a $1.4-billion refinancing plan Thursday based on more modest ridership projections. The 11-member Transportation Corridor Agencies voted unanimously--with Vice Chairman Patricia C. Bates absent--to replace the road's funding package with one that promises a lower interest rate and lessens annual debt payments through 2012. The new bonds would be paid off by 2038.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO
The agency operating the San Joaquin Hills toll road approved a $1.4-billion refinancing plan Thursday based on more modest ridership projections. The 11-member Transportation Corridor Agencies voted unanimously--with Vice Chairman Patricia C. Bates absent--to replace the road's funding package with one that promises a lower interest rate and lessens annual debt payments through 2012. The new bonds would be paid off by 2038.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The $2 charge on the San Joaquin Hills toll road could drop during weekends and evenings to entice more riders to the road, where traffic is running about 43% behind its anticipated use. A ridership study released this week shows the road will not carry as many cars as was predicted in 1992, when those projections were used to sell $1.4 billion in construction bonds. The bonds were sold anticipating 94,500 a day by April 1997; the road is handling about 54,000 cars daily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The $2 charge on the San Joaquin Hills toll road could drop during weekends and evenings to entice more riders to the road, where traffic is running about 43% behind its anticipated use. A ridership study released this week shows the road will not carry as many cars as was predicted in 1992, when those projections were used to sell $1.4 billion in construction bonds. The bonds were sold anticipating 94,500 a day by April 1997; the road is handling about 54,000 cars daily.
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