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San Joaquin Marsh

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1989
I have been following a story regarding duck hunting in the San Joaquin Marsh (adjacent to UC Irvine). Across the street from the marsh, at UCI, the use of live animals in teaching or research must be presented in the form of a formal protocol for review by a committee composed in accordance with federal law. Part of that committee's review consists of addressing potential pain and discomfort to animals as well as assuring that the humane methods...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2003 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, Times Staff Writer
The wonderful thing about an arboretum is that it looks different every time you visit. It's like a car that has a new paint job whenever you drive it. These days at the UC Irvine Arboretum, the Aloe reitzii has sprouted 6-inch-long orange and yellow flowers that look like parrots perched in the plant. The red flowers of the coral tree hang like bells, with seed pods that look like strands of pearls. The naked ladies -- yes, that's a plant -- display their pink and white trumpet flowers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1992 | MARLA CONE and TOM MC QUEENEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One of Southern California's largest freshwater wetlands--the San Joaquin Marsh--has become entangled in a debate over how to balance the needs of wildlife and people during an ambitious restoration of the marsh. All sides agree that the 580-acre wetland needs a major ecological face lift; the marsh has suffered years of neglect and has been nearly destroyed by weeds and urban runoff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2000 | Deniene Husted, (714) 520-2508
The Assn. of California Water Agencies has honored the Irvine Ranch Water District for restoration work done on the San Joaquin Marsh area. The group of statewide water agencies gave the district its Theodore Roosevelt Environmental Award for the work, which is credited with improving the quality of water flowing into Newport Bay and the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve. The marsh-restoration effort took more than 10 years of planning in consultation with local, state and federal agencies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1989 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
Last fall, as migrating ducks landed in a lush and soggy marshland in Irvine on their annual trip south, they were often greeted by more than joggers and bicyclists enjoying the view. They were also met by a few duck hunters. Duck hunting in Irvine may seem an anachronism, but ducks and hunters had been together in San Joaquin Marsh for decades, long before the wildlife preserve became surrounded by bicycle paths, carefully planned homes, office buildings and a university.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1994 | RUSS LOAR
Mayor Michael Ward and city officials are asking University of California President Jack W. Peltason to reconsider the withdrawal of the university from a 3-year-old plan to preserve the 580-acre San Joaquin Freshwater Marsh. The University of California Natural Reserve System was working in concert with the city for several years to develop a plan to preserve the San Joaquin Marsh, one of Southern California's largest freshwater marshes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1991 | TOM MCQUEENEY
City officials will consider a plan in March aimed at making the San Joaquin Marsh a better home for wildlife. The Irvine Co. submitted the plan to the Planning Commission on Thursday, but commission members said they need until March 7 to study the matter because of a competing proposal from a water district. Officials from the Irvine Ranch Water District asked for the delay, arguing that the plan would destroy their own vision of the marsh as a public park. The Irvine Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1992 | TOM McQUEENEY
Joan Irvine Smith and her mother, Athalie R. Clarke, have given $100,000 to the California Coastal Conservancy to help rehabilitate the San Joaquin Marsh, the largest fresh-water wetlands in Orange County and a seasonal home to endangered and threatened birds. Smith and Clarke have been donating large sums to environmental, educational and other causes since receiving a total of $255.8 million last year from the Irvine Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1996 | RUSS LOAR
Agreement has been reached on a plan 10 years in the making to preserve the San Joaquin Marsh, one of Southern California's largest freshwater marshes. But the 336-acre preservation plan no longer includes 244 acres of marsh land owned by the University of California. The UC system pulled out of the negotiations in August 1994 after objecting to the use of treated waste water to replenish marsh areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1997 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
Irvine Ranch Water District has finished work on the first stage of its San Joaquin marsh restoration project. Since June, the district has planted 50 acres of willows, cottonwoods, sycamores and other native plants around its treatment facility at the marsh. Ken Thompson, director of water quality, said district board members wanted a buffer around the agency's water treatment facility to prevent residential development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by the bustling planned community of Irvine, there lies a 300-acre oasis of coastal freshwater wetlands, duck ponds, tall grasses and thousands of recently planted trees. Formerly farmland and later a duck-hunting site, the once degraded marshland has been transformed into the San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary, a viable habitat for the imperiled California least tern, least Bell's vireo, light-footed clapper rail and more than 200 other bird species.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by the bustling planned community of Irvine, there lies a 300-acre oasis of coastal freshwater wetlands, duck ponds, tall grasses and thousands of recently planted trees. Formerly farmland and later a duck-hunting site, the once degraded marshland has been transformed into the San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary, a viable habitat for the imperiled California least tern, least Bell's vireo, light-footed clapper rail and more than 200 other bird species.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1998 | VALERIE BURGHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the back marshes of Irvine Saturday afternoon, several dozen teenagers tasted wild mustard seeds, smelled sprigs of anise, dodged dragonflies--and learned what they could do to preserve Orange County's environment. The outing, which took high school students through the UC Irvine Arboretum and nearby San Joaquin Freshwater Marsh, was part of the university's 10-day Knowledge and Social Responsibility Program 1998.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The water is so still that it serves as a flawless mirror for the hawk soaring overhead. In the background, young willows are taking root. And only the chatter of birds, the pounding of joggers' soles and the occasional zoom of a departing jet disturbs the calm. A wetlands oasis is taking shape in the heart of Irvine. The sanctuary, nearly two-thirds the size of New York's Central Park, has been a decade in the planning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1997 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
Irvine Ranch Water District has finished work on the first stage of its San Joaquin marsh restoration project. Since June, the district has planted 50 acres of willows, cottonwoods, sycamores and other native plants around its treatment facility at the marsh. Ken Thompson, director of water quality, said district board members wanted a buffer around the agency's water treatment facility to prevent residential development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1997 | KIMBERLY SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 11 flat, murky ponds of the San Joaquin Marsh look like deteriorated Olympic-size swimming pools. About 150 ducks bathe in the water, birds fly overhead and chirping fills the air. But the barren marsh that is choking on weeds isn't suited for its inhabitants. A $6-million renovation for the area, which once served as an exclusive club for duck hunters, was announced Wednesday. The Irvine Ranch Water District and the Irvine Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1987
The City Council has approved a 540-acre expansion of the Irvine Spectrum commercial and industrial complex, with stringent conditions designed to avert traffic problems. The new area of the Irvine Co. development, approved Wednesday, will be southwest of where the Santa Ana and San Diego freeways merge. "We've always been very tough to deal with," council member Sally Anne Miller said. "Every nitpicky thing has been dictated to the developers--what they can and cannot do."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2000 | Deniene Husted, (714) 520-2508
The Assn. of California Water Agencies has honored the Irvine Ranch Water District for restoration work done on the San Joaquin Marsh area. The group of statewide water agencies gave the district its Theodore Roosevelt Environmental Award for the work, which is credited with improving the quality of water flowing into Newport Bay and the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve. The marsh-restoration effort took more than 10 years of planning in consultation with local, state and federal agencies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1996 | RUSS LOAR
Agreement has been reached on a plan 10 years in the making to preserve the San Joaquin Marsh, one of Southern California's largest freshwater marshes. But the 336-acre preservation plan no longer includes 244 acres of marsh land owned by the University of California. The UC system pulled out of the negotiations in August 1994 after objecting to the use of treated waste water to replenish marsh areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1996 | ENRIQUE LAVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Irvine Ranch Water District has agreed to pay $45,000 to settle a complaint that it illegally dumped treated waste water into San Joaquin Freshwater Marsh, a tributary to San Diego Creek and Newport Bay, officials said this week. The fine was assessed by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board after state and water district officials met Tuesday, said Joanne E. Schneider, the state board's environmental program manager.
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