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San Joaquin Reservoir

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1985 | Susan M. Loux \f7
Despite some reports of unofficial sightings, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California said the San Joaquin Reservoir, located in the hills above Newport Beach, is now free of the African clawed frogs that have plagued the water source on and off for several years, a spokesman said. Last year, the frogs flocked to the reservoir in epidemic proportions, clogging it with their tiny bodies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2001 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Newport Beach environmental group has filed a lawsuit challenging a local water district's plan to use an empty reservoir near the city to store nearly a billion gallons of reclaimed sewage water, one of the group's directors said Wednesday. "We want them to do what's necessary to assure compliance" with environmental laws, said Bob Caustin, founding director of Defend the Bay, which sued the Irvine Ranch Water District last week in Orange County Superior Court.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1993 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Without any fanfare, a four-year debate over whether to cover the San Joaquin Reservoir to keep the water free of contamination ended Tuesday when the Metropolitan Water District voted to spend $2.9 million to begin the designing of the cover. The board of directors of MWD, which co-owns the reservoir with seven Orange County agencies, voted unanimously to have the 55-acre reservoir capped with a floating nylon-reinforced rubber cover, which will cost $18.2 million upon completion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2000 | Noaki Schwartz, (949) 574-4232
Newport Beach, the last holdout in a deal to turn the San Joaquin Reservoir into a storage site for reclaimed water, might finally agree to the plan if a meeting with the Irvine Ranch Water District in two weeks goes well. In addition to Newport's 1.2% share of the reservoir, the Irvine Ranch Water District wants to buy out the other owners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1991 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The imminent months-long closure of the San Joaquin Reservoir because of rising levels of an agent suspected of causing cancer is contributing to water-pressure problems for about 2,000 residents of Newport Beach. Newport Beach Utilities Director Robert J. Dixon said Saturday that customers experiencing reduced water pressure are clustered near John Wayne Airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1992 | BILL BILLITER
The city could experience water shortages while it undertakes repairs on major a water main, officials said. About two months ago, the city had to seal off a 24-inch main that brings water into Huntington Beach from the San Joaquin Reservoir near Newport Beach. The pipeline carries about 5% of Huntington Beach's overall water supply, said Jeff Renna, water operations manager for the city. The main had to be sealed off because of work on the Santa Ana River bed by the Army Corps of Engineers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2000 | Noaki Schwartz, (949) 574-4232
Newport Beach, the last holdout in a deal to turn the San Joaquin Reservoir into a storage site for reclaimed water, might finally agree to the plan if a meeting with the Irvine Ranch Water District in two weeks goes well. In addition to Newport's 1.2% share of the reservoir, the Irvine Ranch Water District wants to buy out the other owners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1992 | MIMI KO
The City Council this week put off a decision on whether to recommend covering the San Joaquin Reservoir to help improve water quality. For the last three years, debate has focused over what to do about the reservoir. Some homeowners in the Harbor Ridge community above the reservoir want it left untouched so as to not ruin their blue-water views and hurt property values.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1995 | STEVE SCHEIBAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heavy weekend rains provided the last straw for the empty San Joaquin Reservoir here, causing a 150-foot section of the east wall to break into several pieces and drop about 50 feet. No one was injured in the slide Sunday, and none of the houses surrounding the reservoir are in danger, according to officials with the Metropolitan Water District, which owns the problem-plagued reservoir that has been drained and out of service since December, 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1992 | IRIS YOKOI
A three-year debate over whether to cover the algae- and bacteria-plagued San Joaquin Reservoir continued at a heated public hearing Thursday night conducted by the Metropolitan Water District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1995 | STEVE SCHEIBAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heavy weekend rains provided the last straw for the empty San Joaquin Reservoir here, causing a 150-foot section of the east wall to break into several pieces and drop about 50 feet. No one was injured in the slide Sunday, and none of the houses surrounding the reservoir are in danger, according to officials with the Metropolitan Water District, which owns the problem-plagued reservoir that has been drained and out of service since December, 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1993 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Without any fanfare, a four-year debate over whether to cover the San Joaquin Reservoir to keep the water free of contamination ended Tuesday when the Metropolitan Water District voted to spend $2.9 million to begin the designing of the cover. The board of directors of MWD, which co-owns the reservoir with seven Orange County agencies, voted unanimously to have the 55-acre reservoir capped with a floating nylon-reinforced rubber cover, which will cost $18.2 million upon completion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1992 | MIMI KO
The City Council this week put off a decision on whether to recommend covering the San Joaquin Reservoir to help improve water quality. For the last three years, debate has focused over what to do about the reservoir. Some homeowners in the Harbor Ridge community above the reservoir want it left untouched so as to not ruin their blue-water views and hurt property values.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1992 | BILL BILLITER
The city could experience water shortages while it undertakes repairs on major a water main, officials said. About two months ago, the city had to seal off a 24-inch main that brings water into Huntington Beach from the San Joaquin Reservoir near Newport Beach. The pipeline carries about 5% of Huntington Beach's overall water supply, said Jeff Renna, water operations manager for the city. The main had to be sealed off because of work on the Santa Ana River bed by the Army Corps of Engineers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1992 | IRIS YOKOI
A three-year debate over whether to cover the algae- and bacteria-plagued San Joaquin Reservoir continued at a heated public hearing Thursday night conducted by the Metropolitan Water District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1991 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The imminent months-long closure of the San Joaquin Reservoir because of rising levels of an agent suspected of causing cancer is contributing to water-pressure problems for about 2,000 residents of Newport Beach. Newport Beach Utilities Director Robert J. Dixon said Saturday that customers experiencing reduced water pressure are clustered near John Wayne Airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2001 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Newport Beach environmental group has filed a lawsuit challenging a local water district's plan to use an empty reservoir near the city to store nearly a billion gallons of reclaimed sewage water, one of the group's directors said Wednesday. "We want them to do what's necessary to assure compliance" with environmental laws, said Bob Caustin, founding director of Defend the Bay, which sued the Irvine Ranch Water District last week in Orange County Superior Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2000 | Scott Schudy, (949) 248-2153
The South Coast Water District Engineering Committee met Tuesday and recommended the district go ahead with improvements to a sewer tunnel that serves Dana Point. The sewer tunnel near South Coast Highway in south Laguna Beach would get a $600,000 upgrade, said Regina Barnes of the district. A 12-inch water pipeline on Pacific Coast Highway is also recommended for replacement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1985 | Susan M. Loux \f7
Despite some reports of unofficial sightings, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California said the San Joaquin Reservoir, located in the hills above Newport Beach, is now free of the African clawed frogs that have plagued the water source on and off for several years, a spokesman said. Last year, the frogs flocked to the reservoir in epidemic proportions, clogging it with their tiny bodies.
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